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I’m working on a Marketing exercise and need support.

Case 13.2 The Global Motors Survey Differences Analysis

Case Questions

Your task is to apply appropriate differences analysis using the survey’s desirability measures from the GlobalMotors data file. Since you were not required to purchase the SPSS software I have completed the analyses and converted them to Word documents so you can access them.

You assignment is to develop a demographic profile for two of the five proposed models: the 1 SEAT ALL-ELECTRIC and the 4 SEAT GASOLINE HYBRID. You will find computer output files for each in the attached files. The variables that you must include are: Hometown size category, Gender, Marital status, Age category, Education category, and Income category.  Only gender and marital status have 2 groups, so an independent samples t-test for was conducted for those variables and ANOVA’s were conducted for all others.  For all ANOVAs a Duncan’s Post Hoc test was conducted to identify differences among groups. A 95% level of significance was used for the analysis. You have examples of output for these types of analyses in your text. 

Case 14.2 The Global Motors Survey Association Analysis

 1.) Use the TWO unique hybrid model demographic profiles that you developed in Case13.2 to determine whether or not statistically significant associations   exist, and if they do, recommend the specific media vehicles for radio, newspaper, television, and magazines. Use the ZEN Motors advertising   division’s preferred demographic for each medium.

This exercise requires you to revisit the demographic groups you found significantly different for each hybrid model style in Case 13.2With Case 13.2, you identified groups within the various demographic variables that characterize each hybrid model’s target market.  Here, you must determine the media preferences of those groups.  I have run crosstabs for the demographic variables and the media preferences for each vehicle that are STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT associations.  You must look at the percentages tables to determine the media vehicles that are preferred by each of the TWO model target groups you used for Case 13.2 (1 seat all-electric and 4 seat gasoline hybrid).  If an association is NOT statistically significant it means that there is NO DIFFERENCE among the groups for that particular media. For example, for Radio preferences the variable GENDER is NOT statistically significant. That means that there was no difference between males and females regarding preferences for radio genres. 

2.What is the life style profile of each of the possible target markets, and what are the implications of this finding for the placement of advertisingmessages that would “speak” to this market segment when the automobile model is introduced?

To obtain the data to answer this question a SPSS correlation analysis was completed. What you must do is to IDENTIFY the target Life Style group for EACH of the TWO proposed models that you have used in previous parts of this assignment (the 1 seat all-electric model and the 4 seat gasoline hybrid). The correlation analysis is located in one of the attached files.

test book:

Marketing+Research+(7th+Edition).pdf 

support files:

GM Case 13.2 1 seat all electric.docx

 Global Motors Correlations 1 seat and 4 gas hybrid with lifestyles(2).xlsx 

Case 13.2 detailed hints.docx 

Ch 14 Tests of Association Demographic and Media Preferences computer output.docx 

Global Motors Case 13.2 4 Seat Hybrid Demographic Output.docx 


i post the book and some files to support ur work. 

Unformatted Attachment Preview

CHAPTER 13 – TESTS OF DIFFERENCE GLOBAL MOTORS CASE 13.2 1 SEAT ALL-ELECTRIC MODEL DATA – CORRECTED MARITAL STATUS Home town size ANOVA Desirability: 1 Seat All Electric Sum of Squares Between Groups df Mean Square 103.037 4 25.759 Within Groups 1410.799 995 1.418 Total 1513.836 999 F Sig. 18.167 .000 Post Hoc Tests Homogeneous Subsets Desirability: 1 Seat All Electric Duncana,b Subset for alpha = 0.05 Size of home town or city N 1 2 100K to 500K 246 2.49 500K to 1 million 396 2.51 10K to 100K 190 2.55 40 2.63 Under 10K 1 million and more 128 3.48 Sig. .454 1.000 Means for groups in homogeneous subsets are displayed. a. Uses Harmonic Mean Sample Size = 111.942. b. The group sizes are unequal. The harmonic mean of the group sizes is used. Type I error levels are not guaranteed. Gender Group Statistics Gender N Mean Std. Deviation Std. Error Mean Desirability: 1 Seat All Male 560 3.08 1.184 .050 Electric Female 440 2.09 1.056 .050 Independent Samples Test Levene's Test for Equality of Variances F Desirability: 1 Seat All Electric t-test for Equality of Means Sig. Equal 2.293 t .130 df Sig. (2-tailed) 13.733 998 .000 13.922 982.086 .000 variances assumed Equal variances not assumed Marital Status Group Statistics Marital status N Mean Std. Deviation Std. Error Mean Desirability: 1 Seat All Unmarried 110 3.32 1.686 .161 Electric Married 890 2.56 1.136 .038 Independent Samples Test Levene's Test for Equality of Variances F Desirability: 1 Seat All Equal Electric variances 32.819 t-test for Equality of Means Sig. t .000 df Sig. (2-tailed) 6.221 998 .000 4.599 121.530 .000 assumed Equal variances not assumed Age ANOVA Desirability: 1 Seat All Electric Sum of Squares Between Groups df Mean Square 355.843 4 88.961 Within Groups 1157.993 995 1.164 Total 1513.836 999 F 76.439 Sig. .000 Post Hoc Tests Homogeneous Subsets Desirability: 1 Seat All Electric Duncana,b Subset for alpha = 0.05 Age category 25 to 34 65 and older N 1 2 320 2.12 75 2.40 35 to 49 440 50 to 64 145 18 to 24 20 3 4 2.40 2.77 2.77 3.06 6.05 Sig. .139 .050 .118 1.000 Means for groups in homogeneous subsets are displayed. Education Level ANOVA Desirability: 1 Seat All Electric Sum of Squares Between Groups df Mean Square 231.243 4 57.811 Within Groups 1282.593 995 1.289 Total 1513.836 999 Post Hoc Tests Homogeneous Subsets F 44.848 Sig. .000 Desirability: 1 Seat All Electric Duncana,b Subset for alpha = 0.05 Level of education N College degree 1 548 2.48 85 2.61 275 2.62 Post graduate degree Some college 2 High School diploma 74 Less than high school 18 3 3.16 5.94 Sig. .525 1.000 1.000 Means for groups in homogeneous subsets are displayed. a. Uses Harmonic Mean Sample Size = 57.941. b. The group sizes are unequal. The harmonic mean of the group sizes is used. Type I error levels are not guaranteed. Income ANOVA Desirability: 1 Seat All Electric Sum of Squares Between Groups df Mean Square 186.817 4 46.704 Within Groups 1327.019 995 1.334 Total 1513.836 999 Post Hoc Tests Homogeneous Subsets Desirability: 1 Seat All Electric Duncana,b Subset for alpha = 0.05 Income category $50K to $74K $125K and more $75K to $125K N 1 2 393 2.52 91 2.53 332 2.54 F 35.019 Sig. .000 $25K to $49K Under $25K Sig. 163 2.85 21 5.48 .114 1.000 Means for groups in homogeneous subsets are displayed. a. Uses Harmonic Mean Sample Size = 71.124. b. The group sizes are unequal. The harmonic mean of the group sizes is used. Type I error levels are not guaranteed. Correlations Desirabilit Desirabilit y: 1 Seat y: 4 Seat Life Style: Life Style: Life Style: All Gasoline Life Style: Life Style: Trendsett Forerunn Mainstrea Life Style: Electric Hybrid Novelist Innovator er er mer Classic Desirability: Pearson 1 Seat All Correlation Electric Sig. (2tailed) N Desirability: Pearson 4 Seat Correlation Gasoline Hybrid Sig. (2tailed) N Life Style: Novelist Life Style: Innovator .077 .764 -.089 .106 .130 .038 .070 .015 .000 .005 .001 .000 .225 .026 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 .077 1 .069 -.215 .739 -.022 -.014 .132 .030 .000 .000 .483 .649 .000 .015 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 Pearson Correlation .764 .069 1 -.061 .105 .111 .020 .070 Sig. (2tailed) N .000 .030 .056 .001 .000 .536 .026 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 -.089 -.215 -.061 1 -.165 .003 -.023 -.070 .005 .000 .056 .000 .917 .467 .027 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 .106 .739 .105 -.165 1 -.010 -.009 .068 .001 .000 .001 .000 .743 .772 .032 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 .130 -.022 .111 .003 -.010 1 .092 .097 .000 .483 .000 .917 .743 .004 .002 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 .038 -.014 .020 -.023 -.009 .092 1 -.043 .225 .649 .536 .467 .772 .004 Pearson Correlation Sig. (2tailed) N Life Style: Pearson Trendsetter Correlation Sig. (2tailed) N Life Style: Pearson Forerunner Correlation Sig. (2tailed) N Life Style: Pearson Mainstream Correlation er Sig. (2tailed) N Life Style: Classic 1 .177 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 Pearson Correlation .070 .132 .070 -.070 .068 .097 -.043 1 Sig. (2tailed) N .026 .000 .026 .027 .032 .002 .177 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 Blue box indicates correlation is significant at the 0.05 level (2-tailed) Yellow box indicates correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2 tailed) The Sig. Cells give you the same information regarding significance - just an exact probability Case 13.2 Example – Measures of difference Here are some tips for you for Case 13.2 This chapter looks at measures of difference. That means that what you are trying to find out is whether there are differences between your various grouping variables (demographics) and the variable of interest (in this case the two proposed automobile models). You would also use this type of technique to see if there were differences among groups (say gender) and attitudes (say for example attitudes about global warming). Determining these differences is important in developing your strategies for a particular model for this case or for the global warming example you may find that women are really concerned about global warming and men are not (this is just hypothetical). So you would use this information for determining your target market and for development of communication strategies. The statistical test that we are using is comparing differences among groups. If you have 2 groups (say males and females) you use an independent samples t-test. The “independent” part means that the responses of 1 group (males) do not affect the responses of the other group (females). When you have more than 2 groups you want to compare you use an Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test. The statistical test for ANOVAs is the F test. So the output you have are the results of the ANOVAs for variables with more than 2 groups (like home town size) and t-tests for variables with two groups (like gender). For the ANO VAs you look at the first table called “ANOVA.” Underneath that it lists they type of vehicle model. There are two ways to determine whether you have statistical significance. One is to calculate the value for the F test (which is 18.167 for the 1 seat all electric) and compare that to the critical value, which you look up in an F table (which you should have used in your statistics class). The other way, which is what you should use for case 13.2, is to look at the column labeled Sig. This means significance. So if you want to have a confidence level of 95%, your Sig. level should be <.05 because being 95% confident means that there is a 5% (or .05) chance that you your conclusion is wrong and 95% chance that it is right (i.e., consistent with the data). If your significance level is <.05 it means that there is a statistically significant DIFFERENCE among at least one of the groups and the other groups. In order to determine WHICH group or groups are different you do a Post Hoc Test, which in this case we are using Duncan’s Post Hoc test because it is easy to interpret. This is found in the next table with the differences identified by different columns. Since we are trying to identify target market characteristics you want those group(s) with the statistically significant HIGHER mean value. Those group(s) represent your target demographic for that demographic variable. So it might be one group or it could be more than one group. For the t-tests you would look the first table (labeled Group Statistics) that shows the mean values for each group to determine which group has the higher mean value (first table). Then you have to look at the next table (labeled Independent Samples Test) and the two columns labeled Levene’s Test for Equality of Variances). If the column with Sig. is <.05 you assume that variances of each group are unequal and you look at the t-value (and can compare that to the critical value found in a t-table) for the “Equal Variances NOT assumed” row) OR look at the “Equal Variances assumed” row if the Sig. value in the Lenvene’s Sig. column is .05 or >. So, choose the appropriate row for equal or unequal variances and look at the Sig. column in the section entitled “t-test for Equality of Means. If is <.05 it means that the differences ARE significant. You would then look back at the first table (Group Statistics) to see which group had the higher mean and that group is your target demographic for that variable. If the Sig. value is .05 or > it means that there is NO significant difference between the groups, therefore both would be your target demographics. I hope that helps. The files on the 1 seat all electric and 4 seat gas hybrid models are posted in the Assignments tab. THIS TABLE BELOW IS AN EXAMPLE OF A TARGET DEMOGRAPHIC FOR ANOTHER OF THE MODELS TO SHOW YOU WHAT YOU SHOULD COME UP WITH FOR YOUR TWO ASSIGNED MODELS. 1. 5-seat standard size gasoline Demographic Factor Size of home town or city Gender Marital status Age category Level of education Job category Income category Dwelling type Target market Under 10,000, 10,00 to 99,999,100,000 to 499,999, and 500,000 to 1 million Females Married Between 35 and 49 Post-undergraduate degree College degree All groups Between $75,000 and $124,999 $125,000 and higher Single-family Mobile Home Condominium/Townhouse CHAPTER 14 TESTS OF ASSOCIATION – COMPUTER OUTPUT Use this data to complete your Chapter 14 Global Motors Assignment. Only demographic variables that were statistically significant are included. Only those demographics should be used to determine media profiles for each proposed new vehicle. Favorite radio genre * Age category Crosstabulation Age category 65 and 18 to 24 Favorite Classic pop & rock radio genre Count % within Age category Country Count % within Age category Easy listening Count % within Age category Jazz & blues Count % within Age category Pop & Chart Count % within Age category Talk Count % within Age category Total Count % within Age category 25 to 34 35 to 49 50 to 64 older Total 0 15 37 54 10 116 .0% 4.7% 8.4% 37.2% 13.3% 11.6% 15 31 62 20 3 131 75.0% 9.7% 14.1% 13.8% 4.0% 13.1% 0 27 35 5 15 82 .0% 8.4% 8.0% 3.4% 20.0% 8.2% 0 38 62 52 7 159 .0% 11.9% 14.1% 35.9% 9.3% 15.9% 5 185 204 4 2 400 25.0% 57.8% 46.4% 2.8% 2.7% 40.0% 0 24 40 10 38 112 .0% 7.5% 9.1% 6.9% 50.7% 11.2% 20 320 440 145 75 1000 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 1 Favorite radio genre * Level of education Crosstabulation Level of education Favorite Classic pop & rock radio genre Count % within Level of education Country Count % within Level of education Easy listening Count % within Level of education Jazz & blues Count % within Level of education Pop & Chart Count % within Level of education Talk Count % within Level of education Total Count % within Level of education Less than high High School school diploma Post graduate Some college College degree degree Total 0 8 17 66 25 116 .0% 10.8% 6.2% 12.0% 29.4% 11.6% 14 12 32 59 14 131 77.8% 16.2% 11.6% 10.8% 16.5% 13.1% 0 6 33 35 8 82 .0% 8.1% 12.0% 6.4% 9.4% 8.2% 0 4 21 106 28 159 .0% 5.4% 7.6% 19.3% 32.9% 15.9% 4 22 119 250 5 400 22.2% 29.7% 43.3% 45.6% 5.9% 40.0% 0 22 53 32 5 112 .0% 29.7% 19.3% 5.8% 5.9% 11.2% 18 74 275 548 85 1000 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 2 Favorite radio genre * Income category Crosstabulation Income category $125K and Under $25K Favorite Classic pop & rock radio genre Count % within Income category Country Count % within Income category Easy listening Count % within Income category Jazz & blues Count % within Income category Pop & Chart Count % within Income category Talk Count % within Income category Total Count % within Income category $25K to $49K $50K to $74K $75K to $125K more Total 0 12 20 58 26 116 .0% 7.4% 5.1% 17.5% 28.6% 11.6% 14 20 38 40 19 131 66.7% 12.3% 9.7% 12.0% 20.9% 13.1% 1 15 41 16 9 82 4.8% 9.2% 10.4% 4.8% 9.9% 8.2% 0 8 45 82 24 159 .0% 4.9% 11.5% 24.7% 26.4% 15.9% 4 75 212 104 5 400 19.0% 46.0% 53.9% 31.3% 5.5% 40.0% 2 33 37 32 8 112 9.5% 20.2% 9.4% 9.6% 8.8% 11.2% 21 163 393 332 91 1000 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 3 Favorite local newspaper section * Age category Crosstabulation Age category 18 to 24 Favorite local Editorial newspaper section Count % within Age category Business Count % within Age category Local news Count % within Age category National news Count % within Age category Sports Count % within Age category Entertainment Count % within Age category Do not read Count % within Age category Total Count % within Age category 25 to 34 35 to 49 50 to 64 65 and older Total 0 24 47 23 0 94 .0% 7.5% 10.7% 15.9% .0% 9.4% 0 29 91 70 14 204 .0% 9.1% 20.7% 48.3% 18.7% 20.4% 0 114 131 29 43 317 .0% 35.6% 29.8% 20.0% 57.3% 31.7% 0 14 17 7 3 41 .0% 4.4% 3.9% 4.8% 4.0% 4.1% 1 106 113 5 11 236 5.0% 33.1% 25.7% 3.4% 14.7% 23.6% 3 17 24 11 4 59 15.0% 5.3% 5.5% 7.6% 5.3% 5.9% 16 16 17 0 0 49 80.0% 5.0% 3.9% .0% .0% 4.9% 20 320 440 145 75 1000 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 4 Favorite local newspaper section * Level of education Crosstabulation Level of education Favorite local Editorial newspaper section Count % within Level of education Business Count % within Level of education Local news Count % within Level of education National news Count % within Level of education Sports Count % within Level of education Entertainment Count % within Level of education Do not read Count % within Level of education Total Count % within Level of education Less than high High School school diploma Post graduate Some college College degree degree Total 0 0 4 76 14 94 .0% .0% 1.5% 13.9% 16.5% 9.4% 0 8 14 144 38 204 .0% 10.8% 5.1% 26.3% 44.7% 20.4% 0 25 35 244 13 317 .0% 33.8% 12.7% 44.5% 15.3% 31.7% 0 2 7 21 11 41 .0% 2.7% 2.5% 3.8% 12.9% 4.1% 1 27 170 32 6 236 5.6% 36.5% 61.8% 5.8% 7.1% 23.6% 3 6 16 31 3 59 16.7% 8.1% 5.8% 5.7% 3.5% 5.9% 14 6 29 0 0 49 77.8% 8.1% 10.5% .0% .0% 4.9% 18 74 275 548 85 1000 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 5 Favorite local newspaper section * Income category Crosstabulation Income category $125K and Under $25K Favorite local Editorial newspaper section Count % within Income category Business Count % within Income category Local news Count % within Income category National news Count % within Income category Sports Count % within Income category Entertainment Count % within Income category Do not read Count % within Income category Total Count % within Income category $25K to $49K $50K to $74K $75K to $125K more Total 0 0 31 50 13 94 .0% .0% 7.9% 15.1% 14.3% 9.4% 0 6 35 125 38 204 .0% 3.7% 8.9% 37.7% 41.8% 20.4% 2 21 163 115 16 317 9.5% 12.9% 41.5% 34.6% 17.6% 31.7% 0 3 18 9 11 41 .0% 1.8% 4.6% 2.7% 12.1% 4.1% 2 102 109 14 9 236 9.5% 62.6% 27.7% 4.2% 9.9% 23.6% 3 13 20 19 4 59 14.3% 8.0% 5.1% 5.7% 4.4% 5.9% 14 18 17 0 0 49 66.7% 11.0% 4.3% .0% .0% 4.9% 21 163 393 332 91 1000 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 6 Favorite television show type * Level of education Crosstabulation Level of education Favorite Comedy television show type Count % within Level of education Drama Count % within Level of education Movies/Miniseries Count % within Level of education Documentary Count % within Level of education Reality Count % within Level of education Science Fiction Count % within Level of education Sports Count % within Level of education Total Count % within Level of education Less than high High School school diploma Post graduate Some college College degree degree Total 1 28 14 25 2 70 5.6% 37.8% 5.1% 4.6% 2.4% 7.0% 1 3 106 40 26 176 5.6% 4.1% 38.5% 7.3% 30.6% 17.6% 1 30 111 41 12 195 5.6% 40.5% 40.4% 7.5% 14.1% 19.5% 0 7 20 195 32 254 .0% 9.5% 7.3% 35.6% 37.6% 25.4% 9 2 20 43 2 76 50.0% 2.7% 7.3% 7.8% 2.4% 7.6% 5 2 0 61 3 71 27.8% 2.7% .0% 11.1% 3.5% 7.1% 1 2 4 143 8 158 5.6% 2.7% 1.5% 26.1% 9.4% 15.8% 18 74 275 548 85 1000 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 7 Favorite television show type * Income category Crosstabulation Income category $125K and Under $25K Favorite Comedy television show type Count % within Income category Drama Count % within Income category Movies/Miniseries Count % within Income category Documentary Count % within Income category Reality Count % within Income category Science Fiction Count % within Income category Sports Count % within Income category Total Count % within Income category $25K to $49K $50K to $74K $75K to $125K more Total 2 19 20 24 5 70 9.5% 11.7% 5.1% 7.2% 5.5% 7.0% 1 52 54 44 25 176 4.8% 31.9% 13.7% 13.3% 27.5% 17.6% 2 72 77 30 14 195 9.5% 44.2% 19.6% 9.0% 15.4% 19.5% 2 7 90 125 30 254 9.5% 4.3% 22.9% 37.7% 33.0% 25.4% 9 10 34 20 3 76 42.9% 6.1% 8.7% 6.0% 3.3% 7.6% 4 3 32 26 6 71 19.0% 1.8% 8.1% 7.8% 6.6% 7.1% 1 0 86 63 8 158 4.8% .0% 21.9% 19.0% 8.8% 15.8% 21 163 393 332 91 1000 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 8 Favorite magazine type * Gender Crosstabulation Gender Male Favorite Business & money magazine type Count % within Gender Music & entertainment Count % within Gender Family & parenting Count % within Gender Sports & outdoors Count % within Gender Home & garden Count % within Gender Cooking, food & wine Count % within Gender Trucks, Cars & Motorcycles Count % within Gender Total News, politics & current Count events % within Gender Count % within Gender Female Total 39 35 74 7.0% 8.0% 7.4% 81 59 140 14.5% 13.4% 14.0% 127 127 254 22.7% 28.9% 25.4% 77 42 119 13.8% 9.5% 11.9% 38 24 62 6.8% 5.5% 6.2% 38 19 57 6.8% 4.3% 5.7% 29 12 41 5.2% 2.7% 4.1% 131 122 253 23.4% 27.7% 25.3% 560 440 1000 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 9 Favorite magazine type * Marital status Crosstabulation Marital status Unmarried Favorite Business & money magazine type Count % within Marital status Music & en ...
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