Data Governance and IT Architecture Support Long-Term Performance, computer science homework help

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Question Description

Please read the following chapters attached, which describe how information can be used strategically, which is the topic for this week's paper:

  • Chapter 2 - Data Governance and IT Architecture Support Long-Term Performance
  • Chapter 3 - Data Management, Big Data Analytics, and Records Management

Please watch the following videos on Michael Porter's Five Forces model:

Please watch this video: How Does Google Make Money? This video explains how Google uses information to make money. Google collects information from websites and adds it to its search engine. You type information into Google search and Gmail, and Google stores that information about you. Android devices send information to Google that is used to determine traffic patterns for Google Maps and to send you ads for businesses based on your location. Although Google is a technology company, it makes money from information, as this video explains. In your paper for this week, you will explore how other companies use information strategically.

The videos above describe Porter’s Five Competitive Forces model. Use the search term “information sharing in a supply chain” to find 2 peer-reviewed articles from academic journals about the use of information in supply chains or value chains. Write a summary of each article and explain how the use of information in each article relates to Porter’s Five Competitive Forces model. Discuss how information can be used strategically, based on the example(s) in the articles. Your paper should be in APA format and 3-4 pages, not counting the title page and reference pages. Make sure you have in-text citations and a reference page.

Please make sure the paper is in APA format, and have 3-4pages not counting tittle page and Reference page. Need to have Introduction and Conclusion. Thank you.

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Chapter 2 Data Governance and IT Architecture Support LongTerm Performance Prepared by Dr. Derek Sedlack, South University Learning Objectives Enterprise Architecture and Data Governance Information Management Cloud Services Add Agility Information Systems: The Basics Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Management INFORMATION MANAGEMENT HARNESSES SCATTERED DATA Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Management • Information Management – The use of IT tools and methods to collect, process, consolidate, store, and secure data from sources that are often fragmented and inconsistent. – Why a continuous plan is needed to guide, control, and govern IT growth. – Information management is critical to data security and compliance with continually evolving regulatory requirements, such as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, Basel III, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), the USA PATRIOT Act, and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Management • Data Silos – Stand alone data stores not accessible by other information systems that need data, cannon consistently be updated. – Exist from a lack of IT architecture, only support single functions, and do not support crossfunctional needs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Management • Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) – These measures demonstrate the effectiveness of a business process at achieving organizational goals. – Present data in easy-to-comprehend and comparison-ready formats. KPI examples: current ratio; accounts payable turnover; net profit margin; new followers per week; cost per lead; order status. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Management Figure 2.4 Data (or information) silos are ISs that do not have the capability to exchange data with other ISs, making timely coordination and communication across functions or departments difficult. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Management • Reasons information deficiencies are still a problem – Data Silos – Lost of bypassed data – Poorly designed interfaces – Nonstandardized data formats – Cannot hit moving targets Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Management Global, mobile workforce 62% of the workforce works outside an office at some point. This number is increasing. Mobility-driven consumerization Growing number of cloud collaboration services. Principle of “any” Growing need to connect anybody, anytime, anywhere on any device Figure 2.5 Factors that are increasing demand for collaboration technology. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Management • Obvious benefits of information management – Improves decision quality – Improves the accuracy and reliability of management predictions – Reduces the risk of noncompliance – Reduces time and cost Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Management 1. Explain information management. 2. Why do organizations still have information deficiency problems? 3. What is a data silo? 4. Explain KPIs and give an example. 5. What three factors are driving collaboration and information sharing? 6. What are the business benefits of information management? Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Learning Objectives Enterprise Architecture and Data Governance Information Management Cloud Services Add Agility Information Systems: The Basics Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Enterprise Architecture and Data Governance • Enterprise architecture (EA) – The way IT systems and processes are structured. – Helps or impedes day-to-day operations and efforts to execute business strategy. – Solves two critical challenges: where are we going; how do we get there? Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Enterprise Architecture and Data Governance • Strategic Focus – IT systems’ complexity – Poor business alignment • Business and IT Benefits of EA – Cuts IT costs; increases productivity with information, insight, and ideas – Determines competitiveness, flexibility, and IT economics – Aligns IT capabilities with business strategy to grow, innovate, and respond to market demands – Reduces risk of buying or building systems and enterprise apps Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Enterprise Architecture and Data Governance Business Architecture Application Architecture Data Architecture Technical Architecture Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Enterprise Architecture and Data Governance • Enterprise-wide Data Governance – Crosses boundaries and used by people through the enterprise. – Increased importance through new regulations and pressure to reduce costs. – Reduces legal risks associated with unmanaged or inconsistently managed information Dependent on Governance Food Industry Financial Services Industry Healthcare Industry Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Enterprise Architecture and Data Governance • Master Data & Management (MDM) – Creates high-quality trustworthy data: • Running the business with transactional or operational use • Improving the business with analytic use – Requires strong data governance to manage availability, usability, integrity, and security. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Enterprise Architecture and Data Governance • Politics: The People Conflict – Cultures of distrust between technology and employees may exist. – Genuine commitment to change can bridge the divide with support from the senior management. – Methodologies can only provide a framework, not solve people problems Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Enterprise Architecture and Data Governance 1. Explain the relationship between complexity and planning. Give an example. 2. Explain enterprise architecture. 3. What are the four components of EA? 4. What are the business benefits of EA? 5. How can EA maintain alignment between IT and business strategy? 6. What are the two ways that data are used in an organization? 7. What is the function of data governance? 8. Why has interest in data governance and MDM increased? 9. What role does personal conflict or politics play in the success of data governance? Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Learning Objectives Enterprise Architecture and Data Governance Information Management Cloud Services Add Agility Information Systems: The Basics Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Systems: The Basics • DATA, INFORMATION, & KNOWLEDGE – Raw data describes products, customers, events, activities, and transactions that are recorded, classified, and stored. – Information is processed, organized, or put into context data with meaning and value to the recipient. – Knowledge is conveyed information as applied to a current problem or activity. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Systems: The Basics • DATA, INFORMATION, & KNOWLEDGE – Raw data describes products, customers, events, activities, and transactions that are recorded, classified, and stored. Data Information Knowledge Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Systems: The Basics Figure 2.8 Input-processing-output model. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Systems: The Basics • Transaction Processing Systems (TPS) – Internal transactions: originate or occur within the organization (payroll, purchases, etc.). – External transactions: originate outside the organization (customers, suppliers, etc.). – Improve sales, customer satisfaction, and reduce many other types of data errors with financial impacts. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Systems: The Basics • Batch v. Online Real-Time Processing – Batch Processing: collects all transactions for a time period, then processes the data and updates the data store. – OLTP: processes each transaction as it occurs (realtime). – Batch processing costs less than OLTP, but may be inaccurate from update delays. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Systems: The Basics • Management Information Systems (MIS) – General-purpose reporting systems that provide reports to managers for tracking operations, monitoring, and control. Periodic: reports created or run according to a pre-set schedule. Exception: generated only when something is outside designated parameters. Ad Hoc, or On Demand: unplanned, generated as needed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Systems: The Basics • Decision Support Systems (DSS) – Interactive applications that support decision making. – Support unstructured and semi-structured decisions with the following characteristics: 1. Easy-to-use interactive interface 2. Models or formulas that enable sensitivity analysis 3. Data from multiple sources Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Information Systems: The Basics • Transaction Issues – Huge database transactions causes volatility – constant use or updates. – Makes databases impossible for complex decision making and problem-solving tasks. Data is loaded to a data warehouse where ETL (extract, transform, and load) is better for analysis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Business Process Management and Improvement 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Contrast data, information, and knowledge. Define TPS and give an example. When is batch processing used? When are real-time processing capabilities needed? Explain why TPSs need to process incoming data before they are stored. 6. Define MIS and DSS and give an example of each. 7. Why are databases inappropriate for doing data analysis? Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Learning Objectives Enterprise Architecture and Data Governance Information Management Cloud Services Add Agility Information Systems: The Basics Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization • IT Infrastructures – On-premises data centers – Virtualization – Cloud Computing Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization • Data Centers – Large numbers of network servers used for the storage, processing, management, distribution, and archiving of data, systems, Web traffic, services, and enterprise applications. National Climatic Data Center U.S. National Security Agency Apple Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization • Business is Reliant Upon data – Uber (car-hailing service) • Users flooded social media with complaints. – WhatsApp (smartphone text-messaging service) • Competition added 2 million new registered users within 24 hours of WhatsApp outage (a record). Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization • Unified Data Center – Cisco’s single solution integrating computing, storage, networking, virtualization, and management into a single (unified) platform. – Virtualization gives greater IT flexibility and cutting costs: • Instant access to data any time in any format • Respond faster to changing data analytic needs • Cut complexity and cost Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization Unified Data Center compared to traditional data integration and replication methods: Greater Agility Streamlined Approach Better Insight Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization • What is “The Cloud”? – A general term for infrastructure that uses the Internet and private networks to access, share, and deliver computing resources. – Scalable delivery as a service to end-users over a network. – Should be approached with greater diligence than other IT decisions as a new technology including Vendor Management and ServiceLevel Agreements. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization • Service-Level Agreements – A negotiated agreement between a company and service provider that can be a legally binding contract or an informal contract. – The goal is not building the best SLA terms, but getting the terms that are most meaningful to the business. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization • Types of Clouds – Private Cloud: Single-tenant environments with stronger security and control (retained) for regulated industries and critical data. – Public Cloud: Multiple-tenant virtualized services utilizing the same pool of servers across a public network (distributed). Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization • Cloud Infrastructure – Provided on demand for storage virtualization, network virtualization, and hardware virtualization. Software or virtualization layer creates virtual machines (VMs) where the CPU, RAM, HD, NIC, and other components behave as hardware, but are created with software. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization • Virtualization – Created by a software layer (virtualization layer) containing its own operating system and applications as a physical computer. Software As a Service Platform As a Service Infrastructure As a Service Figure 2.17 Virtual machines running on a simple computer hardware layer. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization • Characteristics & Benefits – Memory-intensive • Huge amounts of RAM due to massive processing requirements – Energy-efficient • Up to 95% reduction in energy use per server through less physical hardware – Scalability and load balancing • Handles dynamic demand requests like during the Super Bowl or World Series Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. What is a data center? Describe cloud computing. What is the difference between data centers and cloud computing? What are the benefits of cloud computing? How can cloud computing solve the problems of managing software licenses? What is an SLA? Why are SLAs important? What factors should be considered when selecting a cloud vendor or provider? When are private clouds used instead of public clouds? Explain three issues that need to be addressed when moving to cloud computing or services. How does a virtual machine (VM) function? Explain virtualization. What are the characteristics and benefits of virtualization? When is load balancing important? Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Learning Objectives Enterprise Architecture and Data Governance Information Management Cloud Services Add Agility Information Systems: The Basics Data Centers, Cloud Computing, and Virtualization Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Cloud Services Add Agility • Software as a Service (SaaS) – End-user apps, like SalesForce • Platform as a Service (PaaS) – Tools and services making coding and deployment faster and more efficient, like Google App Engine • Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) – Hardware and software that power computing resources, like EC2 & S3 (Amazon Web Services) • Data as a Service (DaaS) – Data shared among clouds, systems, apps, regardless the data source or storage location. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Cloud Services Add Agility • Data as a Service (DaaS) – Easier for data architects to select data from different pools, filter out sensitive data, and make the remaining data available on-demand. – Eliminates risks and burdens of data management to a third-party cloud provider. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Cloud Services Add Agility • Cloudy Weather Ahead? – Various at-a-service models (such as CRM and HR management) are still responsible for regulatory compliance. – Legal departments become involved due to high stakes around legal and compliance issues. – Cut costs, flexibility, and improved responsiveness require IT, legal, and senior management oversight. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Cloud Services Add Agility 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. What is SaaS? Describe the cloud computing stack. What is PaaS? What is IaaS? Why is DaaS growing in popularity? How might companies risk violating regulation or compliance requirements with cloud services? Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 3 Data Management, Big Data Analytics, and Records Management Prepared by Dr. Derek Sedlack, South University Learning Objectives Data Warehouse and Big Data Analytics Database Management Systems Electronic Records Management Data and Text Mining Business Intelligence Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 3 Database Management Systems • Databases – Collections of data sets or records stored in a systematic way. – Stores data generated by business apps, sensors, operations, and transaction-processing systems (TPS). – The data in databases are extremely volatile. – Medium and large enterprises typically have many databases of various types. Volatile data changes frequently Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 3 Database Management Systems • Data Warehouses – Integrate data from multiple databases and data silos, and organize them for complex analysis, knowledge discovery, and to support decision making. – May require formatting processing and/or standardization. – Loaded at specific times making them non-volatile and ready for analysis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 3 Database Management Systems • Data Marts – Small-scale data warehouses that support a single function or one department. – Enterprises that cannot afford to invest in data warehousing may start with one or more data marts. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 3 Database Management Systems • Business intelligence (BI) – Tools and techniques that process data and conduct statistical analysis for insight and discovery. – Used to discover meaningful relation ...
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Thomas574
School: UC Berkeley

Hello, I'm done with your task, all parts are well and clearly illustrated.

Running head: GOOGLE’S STRATEGY

1

Google Strategy
Name of Student
Name of Professor
Course Title
Date

GOOGLE’S STRATEGY

2

Introduction
The videos present an idea of implementing an upper hand utilizing Information System
(IS) - based applications. It starts with a talk of an arrangement of times that depict the utilization
of information resources. It then exhibits information resources as key apparatuses, talking about
Information Technology (IT) resources and IT abilities. Michael Porter's Five Competitive
Forces display then gives a system to examining vital preferred standpoint, and his Value Chain
show addresses strategic ways associations interface their business procedures to make vital
organizations. For instance, organizations like Google, have made and kept up an upper hand by
building specialized stages and authoritative abilities that permit them to get accomplices as
important to make new items and administrations for their clients. Their business biological
communities give them spryness and also access to ability and information, augmenting the
capacities of their inward staff.
Different firms attempt to explain all client demands themselves. Key Use of Information
Resources distributed computing started new esteem sources, for example, group and social
business and the Internet of Things. This non-exclusive term, information assets, is characterized
as the accessible information, innovation, individuals, and procedures inside an association to be
utilized by the administrator to perform business procedures and undertakings. Information
assets can either be resources or...

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