physical geology

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look at attachment . work on unit 16 lab first. I completed the c & d already so you nee to complete a & B an then do the write up for a b c d. if you don't understand let me know.

unit 14 LAB • • • • • Download Google Earth, if you don't already have it on your computer. Download the .KMZ Google Earth file: Deserts and Winds.kmz Browse through Google Earth tour as you complete the questions. Complete the activity, entering your answers in to the Blackboard activity. You can complete this exercise up to three times. QUESTION 1 1) In textbook section 19.1, you learned that there are multiple reasons for land to be dry. Examine the first stop on the Google Earth tour, the Patagonian desert, and assess which of the following causes is likely to the the reason that southern Argentina is so dry. This is a subtropical desert near the Tropic of Cancer, where descending dry air precludes rainfall. This is a subtropical desert near the Tropic of Capricorn, where descending dry air precludes rainfall. This is a rainshadow desert, where moist air from the Atlantic moves westward, and has all the moisture extracted by coastal cities such as Buenos Aires. This is a rainshadow desert, where moist air from the Pacific moves eastward, and has all the moisture extracted by the coastal mountain ranges of the Andes. This is a west coast subtropical desert, caused by cold upwelling ocean currents (air chilled by contact with these cold waters is more dense and thus resists rising and triggering precipitation). 5 points QUESTION 2 2) Same sort of question as #1: It's time to assess another desert and determine its reason for existing. Examine the second stop on the Google Earth tour, the Sahara desert, and assess which of the following causes is likely to the the reason that northern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula are so dry. This is a subtropical desert near the Tropic of Cancer, where descending dry air precludes rainfall. This is a subtropical desert near the Tropic of Capricorn, where descending dry air precludes rainfall. This is a rainshadow desert, where moist air from the Atlantic moves westward, and has all the moisture extracted by coastal cities such as Buenos Aires. This is a rainshadow desert, where moist air from the Pacific moves eastward, and has all the moisture extracted by the coastal mountain ranges of the Andes. This is a west coast subtropical desert, caused by cold upwelling ocean currents (air chilled by contact with these cold waters is more dense and thus resists rising and triggering precipitation). 5 points QUESTION 3 3) Click the next stop on the tour - "Badwater, Death Valley." Hover your cursor over various points in the area, and find the lowest elevation. Elevation at the point of the cursor is shown in the data bar on the bottom of the Google Earth screen, toward the right side. What is the elevation of Badwater? Express your answer in feet. About 2270 feet above sea level About 270 feet above sea level 0 (sea level, exactly) About 270 feet below sea level About 2270 feet below sea level 5 points QUESTION 4 4) Examine Landform "A" (three examples are provided in Death Valley, each outlined in yellow). What landform is this? delta alluvial fan bajada yardang inselberg 5 points QUESTION 5 5) Examine Landform "B" (it is outlined in orange). What landform is this? delta alluvial fan bajada yardang inselberg 5 points QUESTION 6 6) Considering that the mountains flanking Death Valley to the east and west are about the same size as each other, how to you explain the difference in landforms (your answers to the previous two questions) on either side of Death Valley? There must be less sedimentation happening in eastern Death Valley than in the west. The east side of Death Valley must be dropping (subsiding) more rapidly than the west side. The west side of Death Valley must be dropping (subsiding) more rapidly than the east side. The mountains to the west of Death Valley get more precipitation than the mountains to the east of Death Valley, resulting in more weathering of the bedrock, and therefore more sediment production. 5 points QUESTION 7 7) Examine the next two stops on the Google Earth tour: The "barchan dunes" and the "parabolic dunes" in White Sands National Monument, in New Mexico. Which way is the wind blowing in this region? east to west west to east north to south south to north 5 points QUESTION 8 8) Measure the distance between the two placemarks for "barchan dunes" and "parabolic dunes" in the White Sands National Monument region. (The measurement tool in Google Earth is at the top - it looks like a small ruler icon.) How far apart are they? 20 feet 2 miles 20 miles 200 miles 5 points QUESTION 9 9) Considering this distance (i.e., your answer to #8 above), what variable is most likely responsible for the change in dune type over such a short distance? sediment supply increasing to the east sediment supply decreasing to the east change in wind direction more moisture, and therefore more vegetation to the east 5 points QUESTION 10 10) Enter the GigaPan that's the next item on the Google Earth tour. Explore it - it's full resolution. What's the name given to the flat white landform on the right side of the image? alluvial fan inselberg playa yardang star dune 5 points QUESTION 11 11) Compare the two alluvial fans outlined in purple in the northern Owens Valley (11A and 11B). They are different colors. Why? One is an alluvial fan; the other is a delta. One is made of dark-colored sediment derived from dark-colored source rocks; the other is dominated by light-colored sediment derived from lightcolored source rocks. One is colonized by people; the other one is pristine. One was deposited by wind; the other deposited by water. 5 points QUESTION 12 12 part I) Explore the GigaPan at site 12 (Zion Canyon, Utah) and identify the sedimentary structures in the cliffs at the right. The sedimentary structures seen there are ____________. graded beds cross beds ripple marks mudcracks 5 points QUESTION 13 12 part II) Examine each of the placemarks following the sedimentary structure GigaPan. Which of these four settings is most likely the sort of environment where the sedimentary structure you identified in the previous question would have formed? A) a river flowing into the sea B) a delta distributary C) a glacial moraine D) a field of sand dunes 5 points QUESTION 14 13) What kind of dune is seen at the next stop on the tour? barchan barchanoid transverse longitudinal parabolic star 5 points QUESTION 15 14) Examine Landform "C" (outlined in yellow). What landform is this? delta alluvial fan bajada yardang inselberg 5 points QUESTION 16 15) Compare and contrast the tectonics of the Zagros Mountains of Iran and the Basin and Range province of Utah. Representative samples of the landscape of both sites are outlined in blue as the next two stops on the tour. How did they form? Both the Zagros Mountains and the Basin & Range are compressional, as indicated by anticlines and synclines at each site. Both the Zagros Mountains and the Basin & Range are extensional, as indicated by fault-block mountains at each site. The Zagros Mountains are compressional, as indicated by anticlines and synclines. The Basin & Range, on the other hand, is caused by extensional tectonics, as indicated by the fault-block mountains there. The Zagros Mountains are caused by extensional tectonics, as indicated by the fault-block mountains there. The Basin & Range, on the other hand, is compressional, as indicated by anticlines and synclines. 5 points QUESTION 17 16) Examine the Aral Sea using the "history" slider at the top. Click the icon/button that looks like a clock with an arrow draped over it. Slide the bar all the way to the left, and then to various positions in time, going to the right. What happens to the size of the Aral Sea over the past 40 years? It stays about the same size. It gets much smaller. It gets much larger. It grows and shrinks, grows and shrinks, on a regular basis, expanding and contracting every ten years or so. 5 points QUESTION 18 17) Visit the Dead Sea next. This is the last stop on our Desert Tour. What is the elevation of the Dead Sea? 1363 feet above sea level. 13.63 feet above sea level. 13.63 feet below sea level. 1363 feet below sea level. 5 points QUESTION 19 18) Explore the world's deserts on your own in Google Earth now. Identify a feature, landscape, structure, or scene that you learned to recognize from this lab. Do not pick one of the sites we have already visited, but DO pick a similar phenomenon at a new site. Take a screen shot of the site and save it to your computer as an image. Feel free to add any explanatory annotations to highlight the feature you're focusing on. Rename that image with the name of the feature (e.g. "inselberg" or "fault block mountains") and upload it here as your "answer" to this question. 5 points for uploading the image; 5 points for identifying it correctly. TODO: The filepicker assumes it is inside a list.. faking it out but maybe we should actually be inside another tag (datacollection?) even though we can't use that here depending on how we're invoked Attach File
Northern Virginia Community College Discussion: Global Warming – Scientific Facts and Scientific Consensus Global Climate Change Lab The following statements are about global climate change and A,B, and D are considered true by the scientific community and C is a consensus statement agreed upon as true but more controvertial. .A) Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are rising as a direct result of man-made CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuel. B) Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are rising. C) Rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are causing the earth to get warmer. CONSENSUS D) The earth’s average temperature is presently getting warmer. TRUE Three (3) of these statements are proven scientific facts (proven true). However, one (1) of these statements is more a scientific consensus (agreed upon as true), and thus more controvertible. First you will need to figure out which three statements are scientific facts (proven true) and which one is the scientific consensus (agreed upon as true). Try to find specific data and references that support each of the statements above. You can use textbooks, internet searches or other references, but the references must be legitimate scientific sources. Do not use general encyclopedia-type websites as evidence (Wikipedia, Encyclopedia Britannica, etc,) or organizational web sites (USGS, EPA, etc.). (You may however find links or references to appropriate scientific articles at some of these organizational sites!) Try to find original scientific papers that have been peer reviewed. Do not reference non-peer reviewed books. You will need to submit 1) a document listing each of the four statements, 2) your determination on whether each statement is proven true (FACT), or agreed upon as true (CONSENSUS), 3) the evidence that you have found supporting your determination for each statement, and 4) the reference or link that you used to support your determination. This project will be a collaborative effort between you and three or four of your classmates. The instructor will assign you to a group and notify you of the group’s name and the other members of your group. Each group will be identified by a number (eg. Group 1, Group 2, etc.). You can access your group forum in the Menu Bar. Each Group will be able to e-mail, blog, share files, etc. in this forum. The members of the group will act collectively to find the best reference and evidence identifying each statement as FACT or CONSENSUS. But only one member of the group will complete the write up for each statement. The statements will be divided up based on alphabetic order based on the last name of the group member. For example, if your last name is the first alphabetically of all your group members, then you will be in charge of the write up for statement. The second member alphabetically will be in charge of the write up for statement B), and so forth. If there are five members of the group, the last member will start at the top and help with statement A). Your group will produce one single document with the determinations (FACT vs. CONSENSUS), the evidence, and the references for all four statements. C)Rising Carbon-dioxide levels in the atmosphere are causing Earth to get warmer. Consensus. The most debated and scientifically studied phenomenon of this century is the effect of the greenhouse gas emissions and its effect on the future climate of the Earth. According to the National Academy of Sciences, the Earth's temperature has risen by about one degree Fahrenheit in the past century, with accelerated warming during the past two decades. The warming of Earth due to human activities and natural influences cannot be explained without taking into account the effect of greenhouse gases.The heat-trapping property of these gases is undisputed, although uncertainties exist about exactly how Earth's climate responds to them (Environmental, 2005). Scientists have relied on computerized models, paleoclimatic evidence of Earth’s climate, chemical composition of fossilized marine animal shells to predict the atmospheric changes and the physical and chemical processes that are at work affecting the climatic changes on the planet.Scientists have been predicting how the future will be disrupted by the excessive heat and extreme temperature changes. They are nearly certain that these climatic changes have the potential to harm future generations.The weather based changes would bring various disastrous ecological and social systemic changes like acidification of oceanic water, reduction of food supplies, vector borne diseases in areas which experience changes in rain and high temperatures. Unless greenhouse gas(ghg) emissions are controlled drastically, the effect on the ecological systems will be pervasive.(Oppenheimer & Anttila-Hughes, 2016). The effects are irreversible, as 25% of emissions released into atmosphere today will remain in atmosphere for a millennium from now, unless there is a technically evolved process to capture and bury the CO2. Oceans absorb a huge portion of the climatic thermal energy released by the ghg, the effect of which on the Earth will evolve in successive decades or two into the future. Leaders have resisted grappling the climate change because of the potential costs involved in reducing the greenhouse gas emissions. The uneven global impacts of climate change and the unequal emission histories of developed vs. developing nations produce political divides that have made it hard to find common ground on issues ranging from who should begin reducing and by how much. Uncertainty and scientific complexity make the problem difficult for policy makers to deal with and for the public to understand. The growth in industrial production, as well as living standards in developing countries has been the primary reason for annual increase of 3% of the CO2 emissions. The increase in overall emissions of 66% is more than the growth of the population. Of these, electricity and heating account for 40% of all CO2 emissions.(IEA, 2010). Of the world’s population, 20% about 1.44 billion people depend on biomass for cooling and lighting. The use of biofuels have direct environmental consequences impacting seriously the water resources and food security. (UNEP, 2009a). Global energy consumption continues to grow and the international community has difficulty addressing climate changes impacting the near future. The temperatures could rise from 3.5℃ to 6℃ by the end of the century (IEA, 2011). The Kyoto Protocol encourages the developing countries to use cleaner technologies through Trade from the developed countries. This will not have immediate impact as it can happen only with the reduction of the existing trade barriers. (World Bank, 2008). In order to achieve universal access to primary energy by 2030, an annual investment of US $ 48 billion is needed (IEA, 2011). References Baird, S. L. (2005). Global Warming: If You Can't Stand the Heat. Technology Teacher, 13. 65(3), Oppenheimer, M., & Anttila-Hughes, J. K. (2016). The Science of Climate Change. The Future of Children, 26(1), 11-30. doi:10.1353/foc.2016.0001 UN Environment. (n.d.). Retrieved July 28, 2017, from http://www.unep.org/geo/sites/ unep.org.geo/files/documents/geo5_report_full_en_0.pdf D) The earth’s average temperature is presently getting warmer. TRUE NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies at Columbia University conducts an ongoing analysis of the temperature of the earth using “surface air temperature data from available meteorological stations.” According to the institute and their research, the earth’s average temperature has risen 0.8 degrees celsius since 1880. However - two thirds of this temperature increase has occurred within the last forty years, confirming that idea that not only is the earth getting warmer but it is also warming at a far more rapid pace than previously. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has also found similar evidence of an annual temperature increase based on their testing of sea surface temperature. Oceans account for two thirds of the earth's warming, which allows scientists to get a good read on earth’s overall temperature trends from this kind of data collection. The data collected from their studies of the ocean have also confirmed that the earth's average temperature within the last fifteen years has increased and has also increased “faster than that seen during the latter half of the 20th Century (NOAA).” Works Cited "Science Publishes New NOAA Analysis: Data Show No Recent Slowdown in Global Warming." NOAA. NOAA, 4 June 2015. Web. 27 July 2017. "World of Change: Global Temperatures : Feature Articles." NASA. NASA, 2010. Web. 27 July 2017.

Tutor Answer

Assistance_Please
School: UCLA

Attached.

Unit 14 Lab
1. This is a west coast subtropical desert, caused by cold upwelling ocean currents (air
chilled by contact with these cold waters is more dense and thus resists rising and
triggering precipitation).
2. This is a subtropical desert near the Tropic of Capricorn, where descending dry air
precludes rainfall.
3. About 270 feet below sea level
4. Delta
5. alluvial fan
6. The mountains to the west of Death Valley get more precipitation than the mountains to
the east of Death Valley, resulting in more weathering of the bedrock, and therefore more
sediment production.
7. west to east
8. 2 miles
9. more moisture, and therefore more vegetation to the east
10. alluvial fan
11. One is made of dark-colored sediment derived from dark-colored source rocks; the other
is dominated by light-colored sediment derived from light colored source rocks.
12. cross beds
13. D) a field of sand dunes
14. Longitudinal
15. Bajada
16. The Zagros Mountains are caused by extensional tectonics, as indicated by the faultblock Mountains there. The Basin & Range, on the other hand, is compressional, as
indicated by anticlines and synclines.
17. It gets much smaller.
18. 1363 feet below sea level.

19.
This is a screen shot from Google Earth Clement Valla where it creates an impression that there
is a unified image where the surface appears to look broken.


Global Climate Change Lab
Name
Date
Course
College

A) CONSENUS - Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are rising as a direct result of
man-made CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuel. This is a consensus because
only one group of scientists have been studying the atmosphere for many years and have
also been studying the effects that man-made CO2 from burning of fossil fuels have on
the atmosphere. A “recent relentless rise in CO2 shows a remarkably constant
relationship with fossil-fuel burning, and can be well accounted for based on the simple
premise that about 60 perce...

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