Humanities
You will peer review

Question Description

  1. Please read through my classmate drafts for the (TD project), then Answer the author’s three questions first, and with short answers. Then offer other areas that the author could improve. You should offer helpful, constructive, specific feedback.

    1. Ineffective feedback: This is good.

    2. Effective feedback: Good introduction. You clearly state your purpose and your users, and I can follow your ideas.

    3. Ineffective feedback: This paragraph doesn’t make sense.

Effective feedback: Users might have a hard time following your ideas here. Could you separate your sentences here? Or maybe add an illustration?
and this is the project 

and pleaseyou offer the feedback using Word’s track change/review feature at the draft. If you are not familiar with Word’s track change/review feature, watch this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVG2au1kuCs

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Amu Hassan How to Roller Skate: Skating equipment You need a helmet, knee pads, and wrist guards for your safety. Choosing Skates (Inline Vs Quad Skates) The type of skates you want depends on what kind of skating you would like to do. If you want to have fun and go outdoors or in a roller rink then quad skates are the best. These skates have four wheels horizontally. Inline skates are used for speed and going in a straight line. These skates have four wheels vertically. Skating posture Skating is like squatting which means that when you skate your body should be as low as possible to the ground for the most balance. You do this by keeping knees bent and shoulders slightly forward. Your hands should be low and in front of you. Starting to Skate The easiest way to start skating is to walk like a duck. Your toes should be pointed out, heels together so that your skates are in a v-shape position. You should then take some steps from right to left over again for some time. Each step should become a glide while you get more comfortable. If you want to move faster with each glide, your heels of the skates should be below your body which puts more pressure on the heels wheels. In order to go forward, push from your heels with no pressure on your toes. In order to go backward, push on your toes. Stopping There are brakes added to the back of the right skate. The right leg is the power leg and that power is what you need to use the brake in the best way. In order to break successfully depends on the skater’s ability to put full pressure on the right heel brake. It is just like a car when the driver presses on the break. The car will not fully stop if there is not enough pressure. When you practice braking, the skater should be gliding, shoulders slightly forward, and knees bent. Glide with both skates parallel and close together as possible. Roll the right skate forward but not in front of the left skate so the right heel brake is a little ahead of the left skate’s toe wheel. Quickly lift the front wheels of the right skate and push downward on the heel brake hard. You can use both hands to push down on the right knee to put more pressure on the right heel brake. Skating without falling Bend your knees so that when you look down at your toes your knees hide your view of them. This will lower your center of gravity so that you will be more balanced. If you do lose your balance, stretch your palms forward touching the pavement first with your wrist guards, then your knee pads, and finally your elbow pads. These guards have plastic caps so that you will slide over the skating surface which minimizes the impact of the fall. It is useful to find a place that is level and smooth like a roller rink and does not have much traffic. The “T-Stop” (Inline and Quad skating) The T-Stop is another way of braking. The skater must have to glide for at least 20 to 40 feet on one leg. Lightly drag the other skate’s wheels behind when you are gliding on the front leg. This is called the T-stop because the back skate is perpendicular 90 degrees to the front. This can only work if you do not lean back on the rear skate or use it to balance. The rear skate is like a parachute dragging to stop. At this point you are practicing gliding on one leg with your body leaning forward parallel to the ground. However, when you drag the other foot in perpendicular it will stop you instead. It can also turn you around instead if you put pressure on the wheels of the back skate. The “V-Stop” (Inline Skating) You use the V-stop for braking if you are a slow skater. You use both skates when in the V-stop. Form a V shape with both skates either facing forward or backward. Then, bring your skates converging or diverging onto each other which will slow you down and then stop you. Tricks  Crossover turn: Start by gliding. When you are ready to turn, cross your skates over the  direction you are going. You have to turn your body and shoulder. Then, push off with the skate that’s in the back of you. Lean into the turn and keep your knees a little bent to help keep balance. Jumping: Start by doing a couple glides, then bring your skates together, crouch, and jump. Increasing the distance of the jump will come with your amount of practice. Practice You can practice at a rink or eventually join a team to learn better skills. There is roller hockey and aggressive skating teams. There are outdoor, indoor, and speed roller skates which can help decide the type of skater you are. 1 ENGL 318-002, -003 S15 | Dr. Angeli Technical Description Project (30 points, individual) What is a Technical Description? In any professional career, you will find that the ability to accurately describe things, places, or processes is essential. In this project, you will select a technology or process to describe. You will use rhetorical strategies to compose a clear and persuasive technical document that utilizes strong document design. This project includes four deliverables: a memo describing your plans for the project, a draft, the technical description (TD), and a rhetorical assessment for the TD. What is the TD’s Rhetorical Situation? Context: 850-1,000 word single-spaced print, color document (word count includes figure captions); to be read in a workplace context that you choose Users: Users of a technology or process at a workplace that you choose Purpose: To inform users about your chosen technology or process Subject: Your chosen technology or process What are the Project’s Goals? The purpose of this project is to familiarize you with the process of developing a thoroughly written technical description. As such, completing this project will help you meet the following course goals: Writing in Context • Analyze the invention, manufacture, and distribution of technologies in context and use writing to communicate these attributes in a variety of media and genres. • Write to the different levels of technical expertise of a range of audiences and stakeholders to foster technical understanding. Project Management • Understand, develop, and deploy various strategies for planning, researching, drafting, revising, and editing documents both individually and collaboratively. • Select and use appropriate technologies that effectively and ethically address professional situations and audiences. • Build professional ethos through documentation and accountability. Document Design • Understand and adapt to genre conventions and expectations of a range of audiences including both technical and non-technical audiences; • Ensure the technical accuracy of visual content. Research • Locate, evaluate, and use print and online information selectively for particular audiences and purposes; • Triangulate sources of evidence; • Explain and apply an audience-focused process for planning and designing messages for specific purposes common in business and industry settings 2 • • • Employ an effective writing process, which includes analyzing the rhetorical situation; fostering ideas; efficiently gathering information; and developing organization, drafting, revision, and careful editing skills Select the best media and/or document types for delivering a given message to a particular audience Produce professional-looking, clearly written, well-organized, ethical, and persuasive business documents You will also address the following core curriculum outcomes: 1. Recognize and employ models and practices of written communication specific to a particular discipline or profession. 2. Recognize and employ techniques of formatting and documentation appropriate to a particular discipline or profession. 3. Integrate material effectively from outside sources into their own prose. 4. Analyze and evaluate complex discipline-based claims and current research questions. 5. Demonstrate a developed ability to compose clear, effective prose, including through the practice of revision. 6. Produce professional prose that follows accepted conventions of grammar, punctuation, and style. What Deliverables Will I Complete? You will complete four deliverables for this project: a project memo, a draft, the TD, and a rhetorical assessment. TD Project Memo (Tuesday 2/24) 5 points Compose a memo that describes the technology or process you will describe in this project. Your supervisor wants to know your plans for the TD that he/she has asked you to write. As such, your user for the memo is your immediate supervisor at your chosen workplace. You will describe your plans for creating the TD. Specifically, you will describe the context in which your users will use your TD and how you will partition your TD. Use these headings: • • • Your TD’s rhetorical situation Your research plan; include sources you will use and how you will use them Your partition plan for your TD Complete the reader analysis and context of use charts for your TD. Attach your completed charts to your memo. Use the templates on Blackboard (“Project Information”  “Tech Description”  “TD Charts”). TD Draft (Thursday, 3/5) Participation Credit You will submit a draft for participation credit. You will be working with your classmates in class to receive their feedback. 3 Technical Description (Tuesday, 3/10) 15 points Following Chapter 6 in Technical Communication Today and our analysis of models/examples of TDs, you will compose a TD for a technology or a process. Include the sections, items, and features as described on pp. 128-137 under “Step 3: Organize and Draft Your Technical Description.” Print your TD in color. Staple it before class. Rhetorical Assessment (Tuesday, 3/10) 10 points The rhetorical assessment (RA) is a one- to two-page memo addressed to me in which you reflect on the rhetorical choices you made during the project. In your memo, explain and discuss the following: 1. What are the most and least effective parts of your TD? Support your claims with explanations and examples from your document. 2. What three new things did you learn about technical writing research? 3. What new skills did you learn? 4. How will these skills make you useful in your other courses and workplace? Print and staple your memo. See the example on the next page. Please note that the items highlighted in blue will change each time you write your RA, which you will write for each project you complete this semester. 4 To: Dr. Angeli, ENGL 318-002 or -003 Professor From: Your Name, ENGL 318-002 or -003 Student Date: March 10, 2015 Subject: Your Last Name Project Title Rhetorical Assessment The purpose of this memo is to inform you about some of my rhetorical choices for “Project Title.” In this memo, I will discuss the most and least effective parts of “Project Title,” three new things I learned about research, and the skills I learned in this project. I will end by discussing how these skills transfer to my major and career. My Project’s Most Effective Parts The most effective parts of my technical description are my research methods and solutions. My research methods are effective because I . . . . Further, I conducted surveys . . . My research methods section is strong because . . . In the third paragraph in this section, I . . . I feel that this paragraph is strong because . . . My second section is effective because it is fully supported with research results. I have elaborated on . . . . Also, I addressed my audience’s needs by . . . My third solution is very strong. As you can see in the first paragraph of that section, I identify . . . My Project’s Least Effective Parts The least effective parts are my background information section and . . . . My background is not effective because I was not able to interview a co-worker . . . To address this weakness, I interviewed an intern. While the intern provided me with useful information, an interview with a co-worker would have been better because . . . My . . . is weak because . . . Three Things I Learned about Research I learned that interviews and databases are important when conducting technical writing research. These methods are important because . . . Interviews allow a researcher to . . . . Databases are helpful for research because . . . I found them useful because . . . Skills I Learned In this project, I learned that planning plays a key role when writing. I learned this because . . . I also learned that revision is important in technical writing. My first draft was . . . I revised by having peers read it and meeting Dr. Angeli in office hours. I learned that readability is important and that all sentences need subject-verb-object structures. I learned that revision is important because . . . I revised my work by . . . How These Skills Make Me Useful in Class and at Work My major is business administration. As a business major and future business employee, I will need to plan my schedule so that I complete work . . . 5 I also write a lot in my major; therefore, I revise a lot. I plan to revise my assignments from now on by . . . Thank you for reading my memo. If you have any questions, please contact me at eangeli@towson.edu or 410-704-2858. ENGL 318 -002, -003 S15 | Dr. Angeli | TD Memo Rubric: 5 points 5 Accept Exceptional work 4 Accept with revisions Above average 3 Revise and resubmit Average 2 Needs serious revisions Below average 1 Reject Well below average Memo demonstrates author fully, clearly understood and addressed requirements, producing exceptional work. Memo demonstrates author understood and addressed requirements, producing above average work. Memo demonstrates author understood and addressed requirements, producing average work. Memo demonstrates author may not have understood and/or addressed requirements. Memo does not meet requirements. Author outlines a full, clear project plan. Author thoroughly, accurately completes both charts. Demonstrates an exceptional understanding of RS. Author clearly, fully responds to the audience's needs, values, and expectations. Tone, style, and formatting are appropriate for its intended audience. Contains no distracting grammar and/or mechanics errors. Author outlines a clear project plan. Author completes both charts. Demonstrates a solid understanding of RS. Tone, style, and formatting are mostly appropriate for its intended audience. Contains some distracting grammar and/or mechanics errors. Author includes a project plan, though parts may be underdeveloped. Author completes most of the charts. Demonstrates a basic understanding of RS. Tone, style, and formatting may or may not be appropriate for its intended audience. Contains multiple, repeated grammar and/or mechanics errors. Author misses critical components of the assignment. Charts demonstrate that the author does not understand RS. Tone, style, and formatting are not appropriate for its intended audience. Contains grammar and/or mechanics errors that impede the audience's ability to understand the writing. Indicates author did not understand readings/assignment requirement/audience needs, values, and expectations. Tone, style, and formatting indicate author did not understand the audience's needs. Contains grammar and/or mechanics errors that result in unintelligible writing. ENGL 318-002, -003 S15 | Dr. Angeli | Tech Description Rubric: 15 points Content (10 points) Document is targeted to a specific audience. Document answers all readers’ questions and describes a process, object, or technology. Research and results are presented ethically and appropriately to support author’s claims. Document contains all required components: • Specific and precise title • Intro (definition, purpose, main point, importance, overall description, list/outline) • Description by features/function/stages • Thorough use of senses/similes/analogies/metaphor • Conclusion • Resources/for more information Score Range (10 points) 0 – missing a majority of key components; does not answer crucial audience questions; readers would not be able to make an informed choice 4 – missing key components; low level of quality and/or completeness; readers probably would not be able to take action 6 – contains half of the key components; average work quality; readers may not be able to take action 8 – contains most key components, may miss minor components; above average work quality; readers would most likely be able to take action 10 – contains all key and minor components; exceptional, professional work quality; readers can take action Score Earned (10 points) Organization and Layout (3 points) Document’s partition plan is purposeful, clear, effective, and appropriate. Layout improves document’s effectiveness. Document contains headings. Document contains appropriate graphics, images, and captions. Score Range (3 points) 0 – missing a majority of key components; layout inhibits document; readers could not take action 1 – contains half of the key components; layout may or may not effect the document; average work quality; readers may be able take action 3 – contains all key components; design effectively enhances document; exceptional, professional quality; readers can take action Score Earned (3 points) Editing (2 points) Document is readable and appropriate for the primary audience. Document is edited to adhere to word limit. Document was proofread to ensure a strong author ethos. Score Range (2 points) 0 – errors create an unintelligible document; no proofreading evident 1 – errors are consistent; may or may not inhibit meaning; proofreading may be evident 2 – virtually no errors; proofreading effective Score Earned (2 points) TOTAL GRADE EARNED/15 points /15 points ENGL 318-002, -003 S15 | Dr. Angeli | Tech Description | Rhetorical Assessment Rubric: 10 points Content (5 points) Document contains all required components. • The most and least effective parts of your TD. Support your claims with explanations and examples from your document. • Three new things you learned about technical writing research. • The skills you learned in this project and how they will make you useful in courses and the workplace. Each component is thoroughly supported and explained to answer the audience’s questions. Score Range (5 points) 0 – missing a majority of key components; does not answer crucial audience questions 3 – contains half of the key components, may miss minor components; may not answer all audience’s questions; average work quality 5 – contains all key and minor components; answer all audience’s questions; exceptional, professional work quality Score Earned (5 points) Organization and Design (3 points) Document contains all memo conventions. Document contains effective and appropriate headings. Score Range (3 points) 0 – missing a majority of key components; layout inhibits document 1.5 – contains half of the key components; average work quality 3 – contains all key components; layout effectively enhances document; exceptional, professional quality Score Earned (3 points) Editing (2 points) Document is readable and appropriate for the primary audience. Document was proofread to ensure a strong author ethos. Score Range (2 points) 0 – errors create an unintelligible document; no proofreading evident 2 – virtually no errors; proofreading effective Score Earned (2 points) TOTAL GRADE EARNED/10 points /10 points ...
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Final Answer

New York University

Anonymous
Return customer, been using sp for a good two years now.

Anonymous
Thanks as always for the good work!

Anonymous
Excellent job

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