Time remaining:
Define the natural disaster of the St Louis Toornado

label Environmental Science
account_circle Unassigned
schedule 1 Day
account_balance_wallet $5

Define the natural disaster. Include a general description of how this forms, patterns, characteristics etc.

Mar 20th, 2015

The 2011 St. Louis tornado was a storm that struck the St. Louis metropolitan area on April 22, 2011. It was part of the April 19–24, 2011 tornado outbreak sequence.

The tornado, rated EF4 at its strongest point with winds exceeding 165 mph, was the strongest to hit St. Louis County or City since January 1967. The tornado moved through many suburbs and neighborhoods, damaging and destroying many homes and businesses. The worst damage was in the Bridgeton area, where a few homes were completely leveled. In its 22-mile track across the St. Louis metropolitan area, the tornado damaged thousands of homes; it left thousands without power; and it damaged the main terminal of Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, closing it for nearly 24 hours.The tornado crossed into Illinois and tore the roofs off of homes in Granite City before dissipating.

Meteorological synopsis

The tornado initially touched down near Creve Coeur Lake and moved into Maryland Heights where it produced EF3 damage. The tornado continued eastward and reached EF4 intensity in Bridgeton where a number of houses were completely destroyed. Afterwards the tornado traveled parallel to I-70 and struck Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, blowing out numerous windows and peeling away a large section of roof. The tornado then moved into the Berkeley neighborhood where it continued to produce EF2 damage, tearing the roofs from several homes. The tornado continued on through several more neighborhoods, causing roof damage to a church and two businesses, one of which completely lost its roof. The storm also produced extensive tree damage and some roof damage to homes as well as partially removing the roof of an elementary school. Damage along this entire section of the pat was rated EF1 to low end EF2. The tornado continued towards the Mississippi River producing mostly EF1 damage to trees, however EF2 damage occurred in Dellwood where extensive tree and utility pole damage occurred and three homes lost their roofs. EF2 damage continued as the tornado crossed into Illinois where about a hundred homes were damaged, three of which lost their roofs, and numerous trees were uprooted and snapped.

[img width="220" height="165" src="file:///C:\Users\ANBALA~1\AppData\Local\Temp\ksohtml\wps37E4.tmp.png">

The tornado hit Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, Missouri's largest, about 8:10 p.m. Three aircraft were on the tarmac with passengers aboard. Numerous passengers and other people were in the airport's terminals.

Concourse C had a large section of its roof torn off when the tornado struck. Many windows at the airport were blown out, and signs were damaged as well. Vehicles outside were tossed by the tornado, including a van which was partially pushed over the edge of a parking garage. Lambert Airport released surveillance video showing debris swirling inside the airport as people ran for cover. It was reported that an aircraft was moved away from its jetway by the storm, with passengers still on board.One plane from Southwest Airlines was damaged when the wind pushed a conveyor belt used for loading baggage into it. American Airlines said that four of its planes were damaged, two of them significantly. One was buffeted by 80 MPH crosswinds while taxiing in from a landing when the tornado hit and the other has possible damage to its landing gear. The tornado was rated an EF2 storm when it struck the airport.

The airport was closed by the FAA at 08:54 p.m., and reopened at temporarily reduced capacity on April 23. It 

was expected to be at 70% capacity on April 24.

Note: From wikipedia

Mar 20th, 2015

The 2011 St. Louis tornado was a storm that struck the St. Louis metropolitan area on April 22, 2011. It was part of the April 19–24, 2011 tornado outbreak sequence.

The tornado, rated EF4 at its strongest point with winds exceeding 165 mph, was the strongest to hit St. Louis County or City since January 1967. The tornado moved through many suburbs and neighborhoods, damaging and destroying many homes and businesses. The worst damage was in the Bridgeton area, where a few homes were completely leveled. In its 22-mile track across the St. Louis metropolitan area, the tornado damaged thousands of homes; it left thousands without power; and it damaged the main terminal of Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, closing it for nearly 24 hours.The tornado crossed into Illinois and tore the roofs off of homes in Granite City before dissipating.

Meteorological synopsis[edit]

The tornado initially touched down near Creve Coeur Lake and moved into Maryland Heights where it produced EF3 damage. The tornado continued eastward and reached EF4 intensity in Bridgeton where a number of houses were completely destroyed. Afterwards the tornado traveled parallel to I-70 and struck Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, blowing out numerous windows and peeling away a large section of roof. The tornado then moved into the Berkeley neighborhood where it continued to produce EF2 damage, tearing the roofs from several homes. The tornado continued on through several more neighborhoods, causing roof damage to a church and two businesses, one of which completely lost its roof. The storm also produced extensive tree damage and some roof damage to homes as well as partially removing the roof of an elementary school. Damage along this entire section of the pat was rated EF1 to low end EF2. The tornado continued towards the Mississippi River producing mostly EF1 damage to trees, however EF2 damage occurred in Dellwood where extensive tree and utility pole damage occurred and three homes lost their roofs. EF2 damage continued as the tornado crossed into Illinois where about a hundred homes were damaged, three of which lost their roofs, and numerous trees were uprooted and snapped.[3]

[img width="220" height="165" src="file:///C:\Users\ANBALA~1\AppData\Local\Temp\ksohtml\wps37E4.tmp.png">

The tornado hit Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, Missouri's largest, about 8:10 p.m. Three aircraft were on the tarmac with passengers aboard. Numerous passengers and other people were in the airport's terminals.

Concourse C had a large section of its roof torn off when the tornado struck. Many windows at the airport were blown out, and signs were damaged as well. Vehicles outside were tossed by the tornado, including a van which was partially pushed over the edge of a parking garage. Lambert Airport released surveillance video showing debris swirling inside the airport as people ran for cover. It was reported that an aircraft was moved away from its jetway by the storm, with passengers still on board.One plane from Southwest Airlines was damaged when the wind pushed a conveyor belt used for loading baggage into it. American Airlines said that four of its planes were damaged, two of them significantly. One was buffeted by 80 MPH crosswinds while taxiing in from a landing when the tornado hit and the other has possible damage to its landing gear. The tornado was rated an EF2 storm when it struck the airport.

The airport was closed by the FAA at 08:54 p.m., and reopened at temporarily reduced capacity on April 23. It was expected to be at 70% capacity on April 24.


Mar 20th, 2015

Studypool's Notebank makes it easy to buy and sell old notes, study guides, reviews, etc.
Click to visit
The Notebank
...
Mar 20th, 2015
...
Mar 20th, 2015
Aug 19th, 2017
check_circle
Mark as Final Answer
check_circle
Unmark as Final Answer
check_circle
Final Answer

Secure Information

Content will be erased after question is completed.

check_circle
Final Answer