SWK 5017 Capella University Analyzing Supervisory Skills Paper

User Generated

LnlnOrn

Health Medical

SWK 5017

Capella University

SWK

Description

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Analyzing Supervisory Skills Using an Interview With a Professional Social Work Supervisor Assignment Overview Mentorship and engaging with colleagues are important components of professional development. In this assignment, you engage with an experienced social work supervisor as a means of better understanding the field and best practices within the profession. Through this glimpse into the real world of social work, you will better understand the concepts and theories you are learning in your course. By successfully completing this assignment, you demonstrate your proficiency in the following EPAS and the advanced generalist specialized behaviors: Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior. • C1.SP.A: Apply professional use of self and leadership skills with colleagues, clients, groups, organizations, and communities. ▪ Related Assignment Criterion: ▪ 8. Explain the importance of self-care in social work practice when acting as a supervisor. Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior. o C1.SP.B: Articulate and provide leadership in the application of the core values and ethical standards of the social work profession through an ethical problem solving model to aid in critical thinking, affective reactions and ethical decision making related to individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities to guide and inform ethical practice in the specialization of advanced generalist social work. o Related Assignment Criteria: ▪ 3. Connect the NASW Code of Ethics to social work and best practices in supervision. ▪ 4. Explain how education, training, and practice support can help protect the code of ethics and best practices of social work supervisors. ▪ 5. Explain how technology supports best practices and ethical standards used in social work practice. Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice. o C2.SP.A: Analyze dimensions and differentiation in diversity and apply the influence of relationships and affective reactions to intervention techniques and technologies with diverse clients, families, groups, organizations, and communities. o Related Assignment Criterion: • 6. Explain dimensions of diversity and how they influence leadership and supervision in social work. Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice. o C3.SP.C: Analyze and respond to evolving leadership, technological, political, economic, social cultural, geographical, and environmental contexts to shape the specialization of advanced generalist practice. o Related Assignment Criteria: ▪ 2. Identify best practices and standards related to supervision and leadership integrated into the social work profession. ▪ 5. Explain how technology supports best practices and ethical standards used in social work practice. ▪ 7. Describe how leadership skills advance social and economic well-being when working collaboratively. Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice. o C5.SP.A: Apply leadership skills and decision making as social change agents to collaborate with clients, colleagues, and identified stakeholders to advance social and economic well-being in the delivery of effective and technology-assisted social work services to individuals, families, and groups. o Related Assignment Criterion: ▪ 7. Describe how leadership skills advance social and economic well-being when working collaboratively. Competency 6: Engage With Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities. o C6.SP.A: Apply critical thinking and decision making in verbal and written communication through the use of leadership and technology when engaging with colleagues, individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. o Related Assignment Criterion: ▪ 10. Apply critical thinking through written communication in analyzing social work best practices and supervision. Competency 6: Engage With Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities. o C6.SP.B: Apply and integrate theories of human behavior and the social environment in the specialization of advanced generalist practice when engaging with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. o Related Assignment Criterion: ▪ 9. Describe conflict theories that support best practices as an advanced generalist supervisor. ▪ Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities. o C7.SP.A: Apply critical thinking and decision making in verbal and written communication through the use of leadership and technology when assessing colleagues, individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. o Related Assignment Criterion: ▪ 10. Apply critical thinking through written communication in analyzing social work best practices and supervision. Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities. o C7.SP.B: Apply and integrate theories of human behavior and the social environment in the specialization of advanced generalist practice when assessing individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. o Related Assignment Criterion: ▪ 9. Describe conflict theories that support best practices as an advanced generalist supervisor. Competency 8: Intervene With Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities. o C8.SP.A: Apply critical thinking and decision making in verbal and written communication through the use of leadership and technology when intervening with colleagues, individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. o Related Assignment Criterion: ▪ 10. Apply critical thinking through written communication in analyzing social work best practices and supervision. Competency 8: Intervene With Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities. o C8.SP.B: Apply and integrate theories of human behavior and the social environment in the specialization of advanced generalist practice interventions with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. o Related Assignment Criterion: ▪ 9. Describe conflict theories that support best practices as an advanced generalist supervisor. Competency 9: Evaluate Practice With Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities o C9.SP.A: Apply critical thinking and decision making in verbal and written communication through the use of leadership and technology evaluations with colleagues, individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Related Assignment Criterion: ▪ 10. Apply critical thinking through written communication in analyzing social work best practices and supervision. Competency 9: Evaluate Practice With Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities. o C9.SP.B: Apply and integrate theories of human behavior and the social environment in the specialization of advanced generalist practice evaluation with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. o Related Assignment Criterion: ▪ 9. Describe conflict theories that support best practices as an advanced generalist supervisor. Competency 9: Evaluate Practice With Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities. o C9.SP.D: Analyze and respond to evolving leadership, technological, political, economic, social cultural, geographical, and environmental contexts to shape the specialization of advanced generalist practice evaluation. o Related Assignment Criteria: ▪ 2. Identify best practices and standards related to supervision and leadership integrated into the social work profession. ▪ 5. Explain how technology supports best practices and ethical standards used in social work practice. ▪ 7. Describe how leadership skills advance social and economic well-being when working collaboratively. o Assignment Description For this assignment, interview a supervisor in social work and reflect on the information you learn. You also conduct research on the information you gather from the interview and connect it to critical or conflict theory and advanced generalist best practices as a supervisor. The information you gather through your interview and research should include content that prepares you to competently discuss the following areas in your paper: • • • Best practices and standards that are a part of supervision and leadership within the social work profession and how they relate to the NASW Code of Ethics. The NASW Code of Ethics and how it supports best practices in supervision. Education, training, and practice support available to social workers' supervisors. • • • • • The use of technology and how it relates to best practices. Diversity and how it affects leadership and supervision. How do you use leadership skills when working with a supervisee to advance social, economic, and environmental well-being? How does this affect supervisee performance in addressing social, economic, and environmental well-being? Self-care and how it is applied in social work practice as a supervisor. Critical or conflict theory and how to apply best practices as an advanced generalist supervisor. Assignment Instructions As you prepared for your interview, you designed questions to ask the social worker supervisor about each of the following content areas. You also need to conduct a literature review to gather additional evidence-based information to enhance the information you gathered from the interview. It might be helpful to conduct the literature review synchronously to designing the interview questions. This written assignment is your opportunity to synthesize the information gathered from the interview and your literature review into a comprehensive and concise discussion about best practices in supervision. You must make clear connections between the interview and the theories and standards involved in the profession. Complete the following: Section 1 Copy and paste the e-mail that confirms, by reply of your interviewee, your meeting with the social work supervisor you met with for this assignment. The confirmation must include the name, credentials, agency, and contact phone and e-mail address of the person interviewed. It must also include the meeting date, time, and location of your meeting. This information is subject to confirmation by your instructor. If this information is not included in the assignment, it will be returned to you with a grade of zero. Section 2 Organize your paper, using headings, to address each of the content areas. Be sure that you synthesize information from the interview with content learned from the text, articles, NASW resources, and additional resources into these categories. • Identify best practices and standards that are a part of supervision and leadership within the social work profession and how they are integrated into the social work profession. Why are they important to the profession? • • • • • • • • Connect the NASW Code of Ethics to Best Practice Standards in Social Work Supervision. Explain how education, training, and practice support can help protect the NASW Code of Ethics and Best Practice Standards in Social Work Supervision. Explain how technology supports best practices and ethical standards used in social work practice. Explain dimensions of diversity and how they influence leadership and supervision in social work. Describe how to use leadership skills when working with a supervisee to advance social, economic, and environmental well-being? How does this affect supervisee performance in addressing social, economic, and environmental well-being? Explain the importance of self-care in social work practice when serving as a supervisor. Why is this important and include examples of best practices in self-care. Describe critical or conflict theory that support best practices as an advanced generalist supervisor. Apply critical thinking through written communication in analyzing social work best practices for supervision. Additional Requirements The assignment you submit is expected to meet the following requirements: • • • • • Written communication: Written communication is free of errors that detract from the overall message. APA formatting: Resources and citations are formatted according to current APA style and formatting standards. Include a title page, reference page, headers, and appendices as applicable. For example, the list of questions used for the consolation should be in an appendix. Reference the appendices as needed within your paper. Cited resources: Minimum of four scholarly sources. All literature cited should be current, with publication dates within the past five years. Length of paper: Minimum of four double-spaced pages. Font and font size: Times New Roman, 12 point. Overview of Supervision There are numerous definitions of supervision. For the purposes of these supervision standards, professional supervision is defined as the relationship between supervisor and supervisee in which the responsibility and accountability for the development of competence, demeanor, and ethical practice take place. The supervisor is responsible for providing direction to the supervisee, who applies social work theory, standardized knowledge, skills, competency, and applicable ethical content in the practice setting. The supervisor and the supervisee both share responsibility for carrying out their role in this collaborative process. Supervision encompasses several interrelated functions and responsibilities. Each of these interrelated functions contributes to a larger responsibility or outcome that ensures clients are protected and that clients receive competent and ethical services from professional social workers. During supervision, services received by the client are evaluated and adjusted, as needed, to increase the benefit to the client. It is the supervisor’s responsibility to ensure that the supervisee provides competent, appropriate, and ethical services to the client. There are many models of supervision described in the literature, ranging from traditional, authoritarian models to more collaborative models. Different models of supervision place emphasis, in varying degrees, on the client, the supervisor, the supervisee, or the context in which the supervision takes place. Ideally, the supervisor and the supervisee use a collaborative process when a supervision model is selected; 6 however, it is ultimately the responsibility of the supervisor to select the model that works best for the professional development of the supervisee. The supervisory relationship is built on trust, confidentiality, support, and empathic experiences. Other qualities inherent in the supervisory relationship include constructive feedback, safety, respect, and self-care. The standards for social work supervision should be used in conjunction with professional judgment and should not be the exclusive basis on which a decision is made. Supervisors should always familiarize themselves with the supervisory requirements of regulatory and accreditation bodies that control their particular geographic area, work setting, or both. Supervision ensures that supervisees obtain advanced knowledge so that their skills and abilities can be applied to client populations in an ethical and competent manner. Some areas of knowledge, and the application of that knowledge to clients, can only be translated during the supervisory process. Supervision provides guidance and enhances the quality of work for both the supervisor and the supervisee and, ultimately, the client. The activities of supervision are captured by three primary domains that may overlap: administrative, educational, and supportive. Administrative Administrative supervision is synonymous with management. It is the implementation of administrative methods that enable social workers to provide effective services to clients. 7 Administrative supervision is oriented toward agency policy or organizational demands and focuses on a supervisee’s level of functioning on the job and work assignment. Educational Educational supervision focuses on professional concerns and relates to specific cases. It helps supervisees better understand social work philosophy, become more self-aware, and refine their knowledge and skills. Educational supervision focuses on staff development and the training needs of a social worker to a particular caseload. It includes activities in which the supervisee is guided to learn about assessment, treatment and intervention, identification and resolution of ethical issues, and evaluation and termination of services. Supportive Supportive supervision decreases job stress that interferes with work performance and provides the supervisee with nurturing conditions that compliment their success and encourage self-efficacy. Supervisees are faced with increasing challenges that contribute to job stress, including the growing complexity of client problems, unfavorable physical work environments, heavy workloads, and emotionally draining environments such as vicarious trauma. Supportive supervision is underscored by a climate of safety and trust, where supervisees can develop their sense of professional identity. The combination of educational, administrative, and supportive supervision is necessary for the development of competent, ethical, and professional social workers. 8 Standard 2. Conduct of Supervision The underlying agreement between supervisors and supervisees includes the premise that supervisees depend on the skills and expertise of supervisors to guide them. Respect for the different roles that supervisors and supervisees play in the supervisory relationship is a key factor in successful supervision. To maintain objectivity in supervision, it is important to ■ negotiate a supervision contract with mutually agreeable goals, responsibilities, and time frames ■ provide regular feedback to supervisees on their progress toward these goals 12 ■ establishamethodforresolvingcommunication and other problems in the supervision sessions so that they can be addressed ■ identify feelings supervisees have about their clients that can interfere with or limit the process of professional services. Confidentiality Supervisors must ensure that all client information be kept private and confidential except when disclosure is mandated by law. Supervisees should inform clients during the initial interview that their personal information is being shared in a supervisory relationship. Supervisors also have an obligation to protect and keep the supervisory process confidential and only release information as required by the regulatory board to obtain licensure or if necessary, for disciplinary purposes. Leadership and Role Model Supervisors play a key role in the professional development of their supervisees. The actions and advice of the supervisor are keenly observed by supervisees, and consequently, influence much of the supervisee’s thinking and behavior. Teaching is an important function of the supervisor, who models the behavior the supervisee will emulate. Supervisors should create a learning environment in which supervisees learn about the internal and external environments in which they work as well as the environments in which their clients find themselves each day. 14 Self-Care It is crucial for supervisors to pay attention to signs of job stress and address them with their supervisees and themselves. Supervisors should provide resources to help supervisees demonstrating symptoms of job stress and make outside referrals as necessary. Peer consultation can be helpful to supervisors and supervisees in such cases. 15 Standard 4. Ethical Issues Social work supervisors and supervisees may face ethical dilemmas when providing services to clients. To address those dilemmas, the supervisor and the supervisee should have a thorough knowledge of the code of ethics under which they practice. The NASW Code of Ethics serves as a guide to assist supervisors in working with ethical issues that arise in supervisory relationships. The following precepts from the NASW Code of Ethics are incorporated throughout these standards. ■ 3.01(a) “Social workers who provide supervision or consultation should have the necessary knowledge and skill to supervise or consult appropriately and should do so only within their areas of knowledge and competence” (p. 19). ■ 3.0l (b) “Social workers who provide supervision or consultation are responsible for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries” (p. 19). ■ 3.01(c) “Social workers should not engage in any dual or multiple relationships with 19 supervisees in which there is a risk of exploitation of or potential harm to the supervisee” (p. 19). ■ 3.01(d) “Social workers who provide supervision should evaluate supervisee’ performance in a manner that is fair and respectful” (p. 19). Supervisors have the responsibility to address any confusion that supervisees may encounter as a result of ethical demands. A supervisor should be aware of the differences between professional ethics, core values, and personal moral beliefs and help the supervisee to distinguish these elements when making practice decisions. Supervisors can use the supervisory relationship as a training ground for ethical discretion, analysis, and decision-making. Ethical Decision-Making Supervisors help supervisees learn ethical decision-making, a process that is both cognitive and emotional. Supervisors should discuss and model the process of identifying and exploring problems, looking at issues, values, principles, and regulations. Supervisors and their supervisees should discuss possible consequences, as well as costs and benefits, of certain actions. They should explore what actions best achieve fairness, justice, and respect for others, make a decision about actions to be taken, and evaluate them after implementation. When a supervisee makes an ethical mistake, he or she, with the assistance of the supervisor, should try to ameliorate any damage and learn how to avoid that mistake in the future. If appropriate or required by the jurisdiction, the violation may have to be reported to the licensing board. 20 Boundaries The supervisory relationship is an excellent forum for supervisees to learn about boundaries with clients. Ethical issues related directly to supervision include the nature of the professional responsibility to the supervisee, appropriate boundaries, and responsibilities when dealing with incompetent or unethical behavior. Becoming involved in a romantic or familial relationship with a supervisee is an ethical violation and should be strictly avoided because it creates marked role conflict that can fatally undermine the supervisory relationship. If the supervisor recognizes a potential boundary issue with a supervisee, he or she should acknowledge it, assess how the boundary issue has affected supervision, and resolve the conflict. Although the supervisory relationship is between professionals, supervisors usually have more power in the relationship than supervisees. To avoid boundary problems and conflicts of interest with a supervisee, the ethical supervisor must accept his or her power and be comfortable in using that authority to ensure accountability and protect clients. Other ethical considerations include the following: ■ A supervisor should always focus on the goals of supervision and the nature of the supervisory relationship and avoid providing psychotherapy services to the supervisee. ■ Supervisors working with more than one supervisee should see each supervisee as an individual and adapt to that supervisee’s 21 needs. At the same time, supervisors must be fair and consistent when providing supervision to multiple supervisees. Self-disclosure Supervisors should be discreet in sharing personal information and not allow it to become the focus of supervision. When personal information is disclosed, it should be brief and support the goals of supervision. Supervisors should explain their comments and rationale to help supervisees gain understanding of appropriate techniques to use in the interview process with clients. Attending to Safety Supervisors make supervisees aware of safety issues and train them how to respond to workplace conflict, respond to threats and harassment, protect property, and deal with assaults and their emotional aftermath. Supervisors help supervisees plan for safety in the office and in the community by learning non-violent response strategies and appropriate ways to respond to crises. Alternative Practice The social work supervisor should decide whether an alternative practice, a non-traditional social work intervention, is the best modality of treatment for a supervisee to use with a client. When a supervisee uses an alternative practice, the supervisor should have expertise of that practice and ensure that the supervisee has the prerequisite training and knowledge to perform the alternative practice. In situations in which the supervisor does not have the skills to provide the alternative practice, it may be necessary to 22 involve a second supervisor. In such cases, the two supervisors should work closely together to avoid conflicts and ensure effective use of the alternative practice for the client. Standard 5. Technology The rapid growth and advances in technology present many opportunities and challenges in a supervisory relationship. When using or providing supervision by technological means, supervisors and supervisees should follow standards applied to a face-to-face supervisory relationship. Supervisors should demonstrate competency in the use of technology for supervision purposes and keep abreast of emerging technologies. Supervisors should be aware of the risks and benefits of using technology in social work practice and implement them in the learning process for supervisees. All applicable federal, provincial, and state laws should be adhered to, including privacy and security rules that may address patient rights, confidentiality, allowable disclosure, and documentation and include requirements regarding data protection, encryption, firewalls, and password protection. When supervision is being provided for licensure purposes, supervisors and supervisees have the responsibility to familiarize themselves with specific definitions and requirements by social work regulatory boards for the use of technology in practice. For successful communication, compatible equipment, software, and other infrastructure are required by both parties. 23 Distance Supervision The use of technology for supervision purposes is gradually increasing. Video-conferencing is a growing technological tool used to provide supervision, especially in remote areas. Some jurisdictions allow electronic means for supervision; others may limit the amount of supervision that can be provided from a distance. When using technology to provide distance supervision, one must be aware of standards of best practice for providing this tool and be knowledgeable of the statutes and regulations governing the provision of such services. Risk Management Using technology in social work practice presents many risks. Supervisors should ensure a learning process that emphasizes a standard of care consistent with the NASW Code of Ethics, NASW and ASWB Standards for Technology in Social Work Practice, Canadian Social Workers Code of Ethics, licensing laws, applicable organization policies and procedures, and regulations for businesses. Doing so ensures high-quality services; protects the supervisor, supervisee, and client; and safeguards against malpractice issues.
Purchase answer to see full attachment
Explanation & Answer:
4 pages
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Explanation & Answer

View attached explanation and answer. Let me know if you have any questions.

ANALYZSIS OF SUPERVISORY SKILLS THROUGH AN INTERVIEW

Analysis of Supervisory Skills Through an Interview

Name:
Course:
Institution:
Professor:
Date:

1

ANALYZSIS OF SUPERVISORY SKILLS THROUGH AN INTERVIEW

2

Best Practices and Standards in Supervision and Leadership
Supervision in the context of social work encompasses creating a formal relationship
between the supervisor and the supervisee to enable the development of knowledge, skills,
responsibility, attitudes, as well as NASW ethical standards in practicing social work. Also,
supervision in social work facilitates support, education, and accountability between the involved
parties. Due to the significant rates of burnout and turnover in the social work field, it is
mandatory for supervisors to ensure that they set and implement the best practices and standards.
The NASW posits that supervisors can embrace effective communication by integrating cultural
awareness and cross-cultural supervision. As a result, the supervisees can effectively develop the
necessary knowledge, techniques, and skills for working amongst diverse groups. Supervisors
also need to integrate active listening to further facilitate strong and effective communication.
This is applicable to ensure the success of both supervisees and their clients. Supervisors can
successfully excel in their supervision role by listening and understanding the discussions during
sessions with supervisees and clients. Supervisors also need to demonstrate competency in social
work through their skills, knowledge, and values (Lusk et al., 2017).
In the interview with my social work supervisor, she mentioned that key practices and
standards in social work include embracing ethics and active listening, “You need to understand
that active listening and integrating ethics in your work.” She further mentioned that
demonstrating a lack of ethics in social work creates a significant rift and misunderstanding
between the supervisor and their supervisees or clients. My supervisor, Ms. Gary added to her
point by mentioning a specific example where one of her helpers had failed to document the
proceedings of their conversation. “The clinician asked me whether it would be okay to fill the
documentation with pieces of information she could remember. This is an ethical violation

ANALYZSIS OF SUPERVISORY SKILLS THROUGH AN INTERVIEW

3

because it demonstrates the lack keenness during supervisor-client interaction.” Ms. Gary
explained that demonstrating leniency in such a case would show her colleagues that she is not
respectful of her ethical values as a social worker. Lastly, accountability is key in social work as
Thomas (2013) explains that accountability in social work ensures that the public develop trust
and confidence in the supervisor. Furthermore, accountability is important in social work
because it demonstrates core values, skills, and characteristics that clearly define social work
practice.
NASW Code of Ethics Support of Best Practices in Supervision
Comparing the NASW Code of Ethics to the best practices and standards in social work,
we see clear correlations between the two. The NASW Code of Ethics highlights cultural
competence as an affirmation of commitment by social workers. The NASW Code of Ethics also
cites professional competence in the realm of integrating informed consent, proper record
keeping, maintaining confidentiality, and maintaining professional boundaries (NASW, n.d.).
Social workers need to be able to navigate through their clients’ difficulties and ensure they
connect well while showing them utter commi...


Anonymous
Great! 10/10 would recommend using Studypool to help you study.

Studypool
4.7
Indeed
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4

Similar Content

Related Tags