A model of a planetary system

User Generated

wnznvpnua

Science

Description

  1. Understand Kepler’s Laws of orbital motion.
  2. Discover how the distance and planet’s tangential speed affects the shape of the orbit.
  3. Measure the change in orbital period as distance is increased.
  4. Apply concepts relating to Kepler’s Laws to speculate conditions that lead to a stable planet environment for evolution of life.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

1 Physics PhET Lab: A model of a planetary system NAME ________________________ Student Learning Objectives: 1. Understand Kepler’s Laws of orbital motion. 2. Discover how the distance and planet’s tangential speed affects the shape of the orbit. 3. Measure the change in orbital period as distance is increased. 4. Apply concepts relating to Kepler’s Laws to speculate conditions that lead to a stable planet environment for evolution of life. Lab simulation time: 40 minutes This is a "virtual lab". We will do an experiment using software which can be found at the PhET simulations page: https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/legacy/my-solarsystem Click on the simulation to run it (you do not need to download it). You should see this: 0) Play with this simulation and “mouse” around with it. Try to figure out what all the controls do. 1) Using Select Preset, select “Sun and Planet”. Then select, System centered, Show Traces, and Show Grid. Determine responses to the questions below by running the simulation. a)What are the preset values for: the mass of the star, the mass of the planet, the distance, and the velocity? b) Describe the shape of the orbit. c) How does the distance and planet tangential speed affect the shape of the orbit? (Distance and tangential speed for the planet can be changed by editing the pink position x box and the pink velocity y box.) 10/31/2017 Astronomy-Physics: Gravitation Edit of Original by Mark Kelly 2 2) Click the “Reset” button. Set the masses of Body 1 and Body 2 and the velocity of Body 2 to the initial values you noted in 1). Now, set the distance between the star and planet to 100. Run the simulation as above. Record the distance and orbital period in the table on the next page. Move the planet outward, in increments of 10, and observe (and record) the orbit period. Do not move the planet past 200. (As the distance increases, you may want to move the slider so that it is midway between the center and “fast”.) Make a graph of distance (from the star) vs. period of orbit using the data you record in the table. (Use the graph paper on the last page or create a graph using Excel. Label the axes and use a scale that makes sense. Draw a smooth curve through your data points.) [A few notes on making a graph: The y-axis on the graph is the vertical axis (up and down) The x-axis on the graph is the horizontal axis (side to side) Graphs are always titled as "Something vs. Something else". The "something" is plotted along the y-axis. The "something else" is plotted along the x-axis. First comes y, and then comes x. Think of it that way.] Distance Orbital Period 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 3) What happens to the period as the star-planet distance increases? Why do you think there is a relationship? 4) Using Select Preset, select “Ellipses”. Run the simulation. Record your observation of planet orbital speed as a function of distance from the star. • You can find values by using the “Tape Measure” tool. • Place the body of the tape measure at the center of the star and use your mouse to “pull” the other end to measure the distance to the planets. • Run the simulation and stop it at some point. • Then measure the distance to each planet and record the value in the table. 10/31/2017 Astronomy-Physics: Gravitation Edit of Original by Mark Kelly 3 • Mouse over each planet to find the x velocity and y velocity values. Record these also. Do this at least three times, measuring the planets at different points in their orbits. • Use the equation Orbital Speed = √(𝑥 𝑣𝑒𝑙𝑜𝑐𝑖𝑡𝑦)2 + (𝑦 𝑣𝑒𝑙𝑜𝑐𝑖𝑡𝑦)2 to find the Orbital Speed. (Don’t forget! First, square values, then add them, then take the square root!) • Evaluate the observations you recorded. Write a quantitative and qualitative explanation for behavior you see. Planet Distance x velocity y velocity Orbital Speed Pink Blue Green 5) Astronomers believe that terrestrial planets in binary star system could not support advanced life. (hint: Dole (1964) estimated that the average amount of energy received by a planet not could vary by more than 10 % without affecting its habitability). • • • • • Select “Binary Star, planet”, note the initial conditions (masses, distances, and velocities), and run simulation for a few minutes (real time). Think about what occurred in the simulation and what changes might be made to try to make a stable system. In particular, try to create a stable system in which the planet would receive a fairly constant amount of energy from the star(s). Create a computer simulation that you believe meets the criteria mentioned above. Run your simulation to test. Carefully describe the initial conditions of the simulation, your observations, and conclusions that support or refute this hypothesis. (Note that light follows an inverse square law just as gravity does. The amount of light received from a star falls off as 1 / (distance)2.) 10/31/2017 Astronomy-Physics: Gravitation Edit of Original by Mark Kelly 4 10/31/2017 Astronomy-Physics: Gravitation Edit of Original by Mark Kelly
Purchase answer to see full attachment
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Explanation & Answer

Hey buddy, I apologize if it took me too long to finish your lab report. Here it is. Let me know if you have questions.

1
Physics PhET Lab:
A model of a planetary system

NAME ________________________

Student Learning Objectives:
1. Understand Kepler’s Laws of orbital motion.
2. Discover how the distance and planet’s tangential speed affects the shape of
the orbit.
3. Measure the change in orbital period as distance is increased.
4. Apply concepts relating to Kepler’s Laws to speculate conditions that lead to
a stable planet environment for evolution of life.
Lab simulation time: 40 minutes
This is a "virtual lab". We will do an experiment using software which can be found
at the PhET simulations page:
https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/legacy/my-solar-system
1) Using Select Preset, select “Sun and Planet”. Then select, System centered,
Show Traces, and Show Grid. Determine responses to the questions below
by running the simulation.
a) What are the preset values for: the mass of the star, the mass of the planet, the
distance, and the velocity?
The mass of the star is preset at 200 while the mass of the planet has a preset
value of 100. The distance and the velocity has been originally set to 150 and
120, respectively.
b) Describe the shape of the orbit.
The shape of the orbit is circular with the star rotating on its axis at the center
and the planet orbiting around the star in an almost circular motion.
c) How does the distance and planet tangential speed affect the shape of the orbit?
(Distance and tangential spee...


Anonymous
Just what I was looking for! Super helpful.

Studypool
4.7
Indeed
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4

Similar Content

Related Tags