Latin Etymology skills

Anonymous
timer Asked: Nov 7th, 2017
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Question description

ASAP, all what u need to understand to know ,.

    • Journal 1 and 2: at least ten words or phrases (e.g., e pluribus unum counts as one) you think are, or come from, Latin, along with where you found them (Wheelock’s does not count).
    • Journal 3: at least ten etymologies for the words/phrases from previous journals, including original and current meanings, as well as parts of speech. Students should also distinguish between affixes and root words (e.g., subterranean comes from sub + terra).
  • Reflective Essay: 500 words, excluding any bibliography, footnotes, or header. You should summarize the etymology of a word in your own words, and not just copy/paste.

Tutor Answer

ee.torres.armando
School: Rice University

Here you! Let me know if you need anything changed :D

Journal One:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Vice versa -- This phrase is often used in colloquial speech.
Alma Mater -- This phrase is often used in colloquial speech to refer to universities.
Alter ego -- This phrase is often used in colloquial speech, with its roots in psychology.
Cum Laude -- I first encountered this phrase when reading about university
commendations.
5. Quid pro Quo -- I encountered this phrase in a philosophy document.
6. In fraganti -- This is a phrase often used in colloquial speech.
7. Per Capita -- This is a phrase often used in colloquial use, usually when speaking about
economics. I came across the phrase when reading an article about economic policy.
8. Ad Honorem -- I heard this phrase use in a TV show about attorneys.
9. A priori -- I first encountered this term when learning about the scientific method.
10. A posteriori -- I first encountered this term when learning about the scientific method.

Journal Two:

1. Ad hominem -- This phrase is often used in arguments, as it refers to a logical fallacy. I
first encountered this word when reading an online disagreement.
2. Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc -- I first encountered this phrase when reading about logical
fallacies.
3. Carpe Diem -- This is a phrase often used in colloquial speech.
4. Panem et Circenses -- This is a phrase that I encountered when reading about Roman
history.
5. Semper Fidelis -- This is the motto of the Marine Corps. I first encountered this phras...

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Review

Anonymous
Awesome! Exactly what I wanted.

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