Discussion Questions

May 3rd, 2015
Price: $10 USD

Question description

Can you please help me with writing a reply to each question below? Write your personal thoughts for each statement:


Childcare cost are ranging from $3582 a year to somewhere around $11940 a year.  Depending on the city you’re in that price can be higher or lower.  With that I live in a city that charges more I pay $1600 a month for child care which is a mortgage payment. So that really puts a stress on having a duel income home or not.  We are set on continuing the duel income family life just because we both are too independent to stop working and have the feeling of being a burden for the other.

The Tax credit is nice its helps a bit it doesn’t really help keep the cost down.  It really just shows that we do have a problem with out of control child care prices.



Child care expenses can be very high in the US, especially in certain states.  These expenses can be large enough to deter a parent from returning to the workforce.  One of my close friends realized that his salary, after taxes, was just about the same amount it was costing him to keep his daughter and son in daycare.  His solution was to quit his job and become a stay-at-home dad.  Rather forward thinking 10 years ago but more and more common today.  With both of his kids now in school full time, he is just returning to the workforce this week!  

Child care costs can range wildly depending upon whether one chooses to use a daycare/child care center or opts to employ an in-home child care setting.  Further, the age of your child will have an impact on the cost as younger children demand greater fees for care.  My research led me to a site that shows great detail state by state.  In Maryland, where I reside, the average cost for an infant in a center setting is $13,987 while an in-home setting fro an infant averaged only $9,528.  These figures drop to $9,490 and $7,798 respectively for a 4 year old child.  Nationally, the costs range from around $4,000 to $16,000 per year for one child!

THe child care credit certainly has value.  Since it is a tax credit and not a tax deduction, there is direct relief from one's tax liability.  With that said, there is a decreasing value associated with higher levels of income.  Using the provided average data ($600 tax credit for one child), the credit alone does not provide significant relief from the cost of child care.  In Maryland, if I am paying $10,000 a year for child care, a $600 credit only reduces my net cost by 6%...hardly enough to influence a decision of whether or not to return to the workforce.  THere are other options, however.  Utilizing a pre-tax deduction plan to pay for child care expenses could save you significantly more.  If your employer offers a flexible spending plan that covers dependent care, you are effectively eliminating the taxes on the first $5,000 of child care costs (for a married couple filing jointly).  If that couple falls into a 28% tax bracket, the savings can be as much as $1,400.



Handheld security is one of the "emerging" security fields I feel as it is not yet established like AV is but is also slowly being rolled out. Unfortunately most AV vendors sling some PC based threats (via hash) and don't employ any heuristic or behavioral-based detection. So that means the consumer has to employ their own....

Which means users need to first encrypt their phones (or SD cards as not all phones support full device encryption). This will prevent attackers from PHYSICALLY stealing your phone and may (I am not sure) prevent data from being siphoned from it without an admin account (yes Android used "admin" accounts the user can set).

Here is how to enable encryption on an iOS phone (which is the WORST for privacy and security) >> https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202064

Android (better with security and best with privacy) >> https://source.android.com/devices/tech/security/encryption/

Blackberry (poor privacy best security) >> http://docs.blackberry.com/en/smartphone_users/deliverables/11298/About_encrypting_data_in_device_memory_777801_11.jsp

Also: as per the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in Riley v. California, it is ILLEGIAL for your phone to be searched IF IT IS LOCKED. Now, law enforcement can legally request you unlock it and they can legally try and remove contents from it but if it is encrypted, they will get nothing.

P.S. I support and work with various law enforcement officers at all levels of government so I am not going to get into THAT debate . I am just providing the information and allowing you all to form your own opinions.

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(Top Tutor) Daniel C.
School: UC Berkeley

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May 4th, 2015
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