world literature paper

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requirement and reading list in file , please read the requirement carefully, you just need complete paper. Remember only use the material in corresponding reading list.

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English 2206 – Fall 2017 Kosiba Essay Exam #3 In your third essay exam, you will write two essay responses to the topics posed below. The first response will use only works by authors on the syllabus from the remaining third of the course: Borges, Cortázar, Solzhenitsyn, Walcott, Heaney, Munro, García Márquez, El Saadawi, Al-Shaykh, Yan, Allende, Díaz, Bolaño, and Pamuk. Your second response will draw on authors from throughout the course, choosing at least one example from each of the exam groupings of authors and texts (a more detailed description can be found below). Each essay response must be a minimum of 750 words (there is no maximum, but try to avoid writing a book), and they must be in conventional essay format (contain an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion). While you may use some of an author’s biography to make your point, keep in mind that your discussions should include a discussion of the texts we have read in class and not rely solely on biographical information. Any paraphrases or direct quotations of material from the texts you are using must be properly punctuated (clear use of quotation marks for direct quotations, for example) and must contain a parenthetical citation (in MLA or APA format) noting the page number of the material. There is no need for a works cited page if you’re using the assigned textbook, but if you’re using any other version of the assigned texts, you must provide a works cited page, noting full bibliographical information for your source material, with the submitted exam. This should be entirely your own argument, and you are not allowed to use any secondary material in this exam (your textbook is your only source). As much as these are your own arguments, you should, however, minimize your use of “I” unless absolutely necessary (except in Question #2 on this exam, which lends itself to a greater use of “I”). Your two essay responses MUST be in the same computer file in order to upload them. Your completed exam will be uploaded via a Turnitin.com link in the course shell in Canvas (found under “Modules”). The Turnitin link will allow for cut and paste uploads, but I prefer you use the upload feature to avoid the potential for lost points due to formatting errors (files formatted for Microsoft Word® (.doc/.docx), OpenOffice Text (.odt), WordPerfect® (.wpd), PostScript (.ps/.eps), HTML, Hangul Word Processor file (.hwp), Rich text format (.rtf), Plain text (.txt), Google Docs via Google Drive™, and Adobe® PDF are accepted). I will grade your exams via the same Turnitin link, so you will be able to see detailed feedback there once the exam is graded. General comments and the numerical score will be available via the Canvas gradebook. Your exam is worth 400 points (200 points each--40% of your final grade) and is due by 4:00 p.m. on Friday, December 8th (the end of our final exam period). Anything submitted after that due date and time WILL NOT BE GRADED, as the class will be officially over. Your overall submission will be graded based on the proper use of essay format for both responses (clear paragraphs, a clear introduction, a thesis statement, etc.), the clarity of your writing (including proper use of spelling, punctuation, and grammar), proper punctuation/citation of any source material, the strength of your arguments, and your ability to use examples from the assigned texts to strongly support your argument. You may take advantage of writing assistance via the Writing Center on campus to help you with composing, organizing, and polishing your work. Topics for Essay Exam #2: MAKE SURE BOTH RESPONSES ARE IN THE SAME COMPUTER FILE FOR UPLOADING PURPOSES. Question #1: (Drawing examples from only works on the syllabus by Borges, Cortázar, Solzhenitsyn, Walcott, Heaney, Munro, García Márquez, El Saadawi, Al-Shaykh, Yan, Allende, Díaz, Bolaño, and Pamuk.) Human beings across the globe, regardless of cultural differences, are continually experiencing the effects of time. We either don’t feel we have enough time, we feel time passes too quickly, we feel time passing us by, we witness how things change over time, or time impacts us in a variety of other ways. Choosing three examples from three different authors, what are three significant (specific) instances where we have seen time experienced by a character or discussed within a literary text? What is the context for the discussion or how is the character experiencing time? What lesson can we, as readers, take away from reading about time in these various contexts? Question #2: For this comprehensive question, you will need to choose one author from each of the following groups (three total) and use at least one of their works listed on the syllabus in support of your response. Group 1: Behn, de la Cruz, Voltaire, Swift, Bashō, Equiano, Goethe, Blake, Wordsworth, Keats, Baudelaire, or Rimbaud Group 2: Dostoyevsky, Tagore, Ibsen, Conrad, Joyce, She, Kafka, Yeats, Rilke, or Neruda Group 3: Borges, Cortázar, Solzhenitsyn, Walcott, Heaney, Munro, García Márquez, El Saadawi, Al-Shaykh, Yan, Allende, Díaz, Bolaño, or Pamuk Imagine that a week or two after finishing this course, you’re at a holiday party and someone asks you what you’ve been studying during the fall semester. Among your other courses, you mention that you’ve taken World Literature After 1660. The person responds, “What’s the point in taking a class like that anyway? Are any of the texts worth reading?” What is your response? Keep in mind that in either arguing for or against the value of the course or any texts within it you still need to incorporate at least three examples from or discussions of the texts in the groups above (one text per group) to support your answer. For Questions #1 Jorge Luis Borges “The Garden of Forking Paths” Cortázar “House Taken Over” Alexander Solzhenitsyn “Matryona’s Home” Derek Walcott “Ruins of a Great House,” “Crusoe’s Journal,” and “North and South” Seamus Heaney “Digging,” “The Tollund Man,” and “The Haw Lantern” Alice Munro “Walker Brothers Cowboy” Márquez “Death Constant Beyond Love” Nawal El Saadawi “In Camera” Hanan Al-Shaykh “The Women’s Swimming Pool” Mo Yan “The Old Gun” Isabel Allende “And of Clay We Are Created” Junot Diaz “Drown” Orhan Pamuk “To Look Out the Window” For Question #2 Group 1: Aphra Behn Oroonoko Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz “From The Poet’s Answer to the Most Illustrious Sor Filotea Voltaire’s Candide Jonathan Swift “A Modest Proposal” Basho “From The Narrow Road to the Deep North” Olaudah Equiano “From The Interesting Life of Olaudah Equiano Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Faust William Blake “Introduction,” “The Lamb,” “The Tyger,” and “London” William Wordsworth “Ode on Intimations of Immortality” and “The World Is Too Much With Us” John Keats “Bright Star” and “Ode on a Grecian Urn” Charles Baudelaire “To the Reader” and “A Carcass” Arthur Rimbaud “The Drunken Boat” Group 2: Fyodor Dostoyevsky Notes from Underground Rabindranath Tagore “Punishment” and “Kabuliwala” Henrick Ibsen Hedda Gabler Joseph Conrad Heart of Darkness Conrad’s Heart of Darkness cont James Joyce “The Dead” Lao She “An Old and Established Name” Franz Kafka The Metamorphosis William Butler Yeats “The Second Coming,” and “Among School Children” Rainer Maria Rilke “Archaic Torso of Apollo” and “The Panther” Pablo Neruda “Tonight I Can Write…” and “I’m Explaining a Few Things” Group 3 Jorge Luis Borges “The Garden of Forking Paths” Cortázar “House Taken Over” Alexander Solzhenitsyn “Matryona’s Home” Derek Walcott “Ruins of a Great House,” “Crusoe’s Journal,” and “North and South” Seamus Heaney “Digging,” “The Tollund Man,” and “The Haw Lantern” Alice Munro “Walker Brothers Cowboy” Márquez “Death Constant Beyond Love” Nawal El Saadawi “In Camera” Hanan Al-Shaykh “The Women’s Swimming Pool” Mo Yan “The Old Gun” Isabel Allende “And of Clay We Are Created” Junot Diaz “Drown” Orhan Pamuk “To Look Out the Window” For Questions #1 Jorge Luis Borges “The Garden of Forking Paths” Cortázar “House Taken Over” Alexander Solzhenitsyn “Matryona’s Home” Derek Walcott “Ruins of a Great House,” “Crusoe’s Journal,” and “North and South” Seamus Heaney “Digging,” “The Tollund Man,” and “The Haw Lantern” Alice Munro “Walker Brothers Cowboy” Márquez “Death Constant Beyond Love” Nawal El Saadawi “In Camera” Hanan Al-Shaykh “The Women’s Swimming Pool” Mo Yan “The Old Gun” Isabel Allende “And of Clay We Are Created” Junot Diaz “Drown” Orhan Pamuk “To Look Out the Window” For Question #2 Group 1: Aphra Behn Oroonoko Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz “From The Poet’s Answer to the Most Illustrious Sor Filotea Voltaire’s Candide Jonathan Swift “A Modest Proposal” Basho “From The Narrow Road to the Deep North” Olaudah Equiano “From The Interesting Life of Olaudah Equiano Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Faust William Blake “Introduction,” “The Lamb,” “The Tyger,” and “London” William Wordsworth “Ode on Intimations of Immortality” and “The World Is Too Much With Us” John Keats “Bright Star” and “Ode on a Grecian Urn” Charles Baudelaire “To the Reader” and “A Carcass” Arthur Rimbaud “The Drunken Boat” Group 2: Fyodor Dostoyevsky Notes from Underground Rabindranath Tagore “Punishment” and “Kabuliwala” Henrick Ibsen Hedda Gabler Joseph Conrad Heart of Darkness Conrad’s Heart of Darkness cont James Joyce “The Dead” Lao She “An Old and Established Name” Franz Kafka The Metamorphosis William Butler Yeats “The Second Coming,” and “Among School Children” Rainer Maria Rilke “Archaic Torso of Apollo” and “The Panther” Pablo Neruda “Tonight I Can Write…” and “I’m Explaining a Few Things” Group 3 Jorge Luis Borges “The Garden of Forking Paths” Cortázar “House Taken Over” Alexander Solzhenitsyn “Matryona’s Home” Derek Walcott “Ruins of a Great House,” “Crusoe’s Journal,” and “North and South” Seamus Heaney “Digging,” “The Tollund Man,” and “The Haw Lantern” Alice Munro “Walker Brothers Cowboy” Márquez “Death Constant Beyond Love” Nawal El Saadawi “In Camera” Hanan Al-Shaykh “The Women’s Swimming Pool” Mo Yan “The Old Gun” Isabel Allende “And of Clay We Are Created” Junot Diaz “Drown” Orhan Pamuk “To Look Out the Window”
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Question 1:
Time, as a theme in art, has been explored throughout various different artforms. Literature,
specifically, has allowed authors to make it one of its central themes for discussion. The mortal
nature of mankind makes it a very appealing theme to write about; after all, every single one of
the world’s writers is afflicted with limited time. The way in which this struggle is presented will
vary depending on the author, though they all achieve a similar purpose in the audience. Because
it is possible for us, too, to be encumbered by the idea of time, these texts are easy to relate. Even
if they are created in a different societal context, the struggle with time can transcend the barriers
imposed by cultural backgrounds. Time, on its own, is powerful enough to mark the moments of
a given character or narrator. There were three stories where I felt that time had a significant effect
on the story being told. Though each of these stories focus, even if just a bit, on the passing of
time, their focus is, for each, on a different point of time. The past, present and the future are
examined as the inevitable consequences of living and their ramifications are analyzed by the
authors through the specific point of views of their characters.
When looking for the past, “Ruins of a Great House” by Derek Walcott is the perfect piece.
The poem, spoken from the perspective of an unnamed narrator, describes the ruins of an old,
downtrodden home. The text will describe various elements of the structures and what has changed
with them. These changes can often be only superficial, like the loss of the marble adornments that
could be found around the home. Of them, Walcott writes: “Marble like Greece, like Faulkner's
South in stone, / Deciduous beauty prospered and is gone“ (13-14). The meaning behind these
losses, though, are also presented throughout the text. The beautiful decorations and the
magnificent structures that used to be raised around it were the result of an terrible time in our
history. The house that is being described, after all,...


Anonymous
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