Lab Report

Anonymous
timer Asked: Dec 2nd, 2017
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Question description

Hello , I will send u guys the material about it. The that we have done + the work sheet etc.

I want it at least two pages , it is worth 100 point

Physics I: Force Worksheet Class: Section: Lab Group: Assignment Date: UP1 001 32 9-26-17 Names: James Fountain IV Abhishek Kumbhani Shabib Alzuabi answer key: numbers Table 1: Determining Angle of Track 14.5 Rise, m Hypoteneuse, m Angle from Horizontal , degrees Table 2: Measurements of Cart Mass of Cart, kg 186 Experimental Force, N 4.47 Theoretical Force, N % Error of Forces, % Theoretical Acceleration, m/s^2 Acceleration from Position, m/s^2 Acceleration from Velocity, m/s^2 %Error between Theoretical and Nearest Measured Acceleration et James Fountain IV Abhishek Kumbhani Shabib Alzuabi text data rements of Cart 0.517 .380 .394 3,553299 3.55 .764 .926 .921 17.0 17,04669 Free Body Diagrams Instructions : Present free body diagrams of the cart, one when tied back and one when freely r indicate the coordinate system; label and show the direction of all forces and off-axis components; a diagram. From the resulting set of four equations, derive formula in a readable, understandable, lo cart, and 2) the expected acceleration on the rolling 1. Diagram expected tension James 2. Diagram of expected James Shabib Shabib Abhishek Abhishek Diagrams nd one when freely rolling, from each student. For each diagram, clearly -axis components; and write a sum of forces equation for each axis from the e, understandable, logical way for 1) the expected tension on the restrained eration on the rolling cart. 2. Diagram of expected acceleration Graphs of Cart in Motion Figure 1: Position of Cart over Time Position vs. Time 0,400 0,350 Position (m) 0,300 0,250 0,200 0,150 0,100 0,050 0,000 0,150 0,170 0,190 0,210 0,230 0,250 0,270 Time (s) Figure 2: Velocity of Cart over Time with Linea Velocity vs. Time 0,800 0,700 0,700 Velocity (m/s) 0,600 0,500 0,400 0,300 0,200 0,100 0,000 0,150 0,170 0,190 0,210 0,230 0,250 Time (s) 0,270 0,290 art in Motion of Cart over Time y = 0,4631x2 + 0,4116x + 0,1513 R² = 1 0,270 0,290 0,310 0,330 over Time with Linear Fit 0,350 y = 0,9214x + 0,4133 R² = 0,9998 0,290 0,310 0,330 0,350 Motion Data Instructions : Put all raw data in lefthand columns. In the columns on the right, place (at the top) just the portion of your data that you are using in your analysis. Experimental Data Selected Data time (s) position (m) velocity (m/s) time (s) position (m) 0.033333 0.066666 0.099999 0.133332 0.166665 0.199998 0.233331 0.266664 0.299997 0.33333 0.366663 0.399996 0.433329 0.466662 0.499995 0.533328 0.566661 0.599994 0.633327 0.66666 0.699993 0.733326 0.766659 0.799992 0.833325 0.866658 0.899991 0.933324 0.966657 0.99999 0.1761305 0.1799035 0.1963675 0.214032 0.2327255 0.252105 0.2725135 0.293951 0.3164175 0.339913 0.3644375 0.3898195 0.418117 0.442813 0.470253 0.499408 0.5297635 0.560805 0.593047 0.628033 0.6621615 0.6971475 0.733334 0.7698635 0.8075935 0.8463525 0.8861405 0.9261 0.96726 1.009792 0.22095137618 0.348863071964 0.473430484305 0.533513251799 0.570957792911 0.598255149218 0.627982113154 0.658566585666 0.689293976273 0.721164711647 0.752606692734 0.788050380504 0.794910449104 0.802770944376 0.846075127418 0.887092620926 0.921821718217 0.956122061221 0.999997916646 1.02886737201 1.04330209969 1.06716942169 1.0908938256 1.11661908286 1.14648896489 1.17464382977 1.19722488892 1.21920569206 1.2441734834 1.26253845872 0.199998 0.233331 0.266664 0.299997 0.33333 0.252105 0.2725135 0.293951 0.3164175 0.339913 t, place (at the top) just the s. ed Data velocity (m/s) 0.598255149218 0.627982113154 0.658566585666 0.689293976273 0.721164711647 0,200 0,233 0,267 0,300 0,333 0.252105 0.2725135 0.293951 0.3164175 0.339913 0,200 0,233 0,267 0,300 0,333 0,200 0,233 0,267 0,300 0,333 0,252 0,273 0,294 0,316 0,340 0,598 0,628 0,659 0,689 0,721 Position vs. Time 0,400 0,350 Position (m) 0,300 0,250 y = 0,4631x2 + 0,4116x + 0,1513 R² = 1 0,200 0,150 0,100 0,050 0,000 0,150 0,170 0,190 0,210 0,230 0,250 0,270 0,290 0,310 0,330 Time (s) Velocity vs. Time 0,800 Velocity (m/s) 0,700 0,600 y = 0,9214x + 0,4133 R² = 0,9998 0,500 0,400 0,300 0,200 0,100 0,000 0,150 0,170 0,190 0,210 0,230 0,250 Time (s) 0,270 0,290 0,310 0,330 0,4116x + 0,1513 0,330 0,350 ,9214x + 0,4133 0,330 0,350
Physics I: Force Worksheet Class: Section: Lab Group: Assignment Date: Names: answer key: numbers Table 1: Determining Angle of Track Rise, m Hypoteneuse, m Angle from Horizontal , degrees Table 2: Measurements of Cart Mass of Cart, kg Experimental Force, N Theoretical Force, N % Error of Forces, % Theoretical Acceleration, m/s^2 Acceleration from Position, m/s^2 Acceleration from Velocity, m/s^2 %Error between Theoretical and Nearest Measured Acceleration et text rements of Cart data Free Body Diagrams Instructions : Present free body diagrams of the cart, one when tied back and one when freely r indicate the coordinate system; label and show the direction of all forces and off-axis components; a diagram. From the resulting set of four equations, derive formula in a readable, understandable, lo cart, and 2) the expected acceleration on the rolling Diagrams nd one when freely rolling, from each student. For each diagram, clearly -axis components; and write a sum of forces equation for each axis from the e, understandable, logical way for 1) the expected tension on the restrained eration on the rolling cart. Graphs of Cart in Motion Figure 1: Position of Cart over Time Figure 2: Velocity of Cart over Time with Linea art in Motion of Cart over Time over Time with Linear Fit Motion Data Instructions : Put all raw data in lefthand columns. In the columns on the right, place (at the top) just the portion of your data that you are using in your analysis. Experimental Data time (s) position (m) velocity (m/s) Selected Data time (s) position (m) t, place (at the top) just the s. ed Data velocity (m/s)
Forces Theory A force applied to an object can change its motion: 𝐹 = 𝑚𝑎. For an object to remain at rest, all forces on that object must add up to zero: ∑𝐹 = 0. Since this is true along any axis as well, we have ∑𝐹𝑥 = 0 and ∑𝐹𝑦 = 0. We can use these facts to deduce the forces present in a given situation. To accomplish this, we need to clearly establish what question of fact we are attempting to determine, what factors influence that, and how they are related. To make it easier to think about, we abstract away from the detailed complexity of the real world, to a model that is as simple as we can make it, while still capturing all the facts and relationships necessary to determine the answer to our question. To accomplish that in a reliable and efficient way, a systematic approach can be helpful; such as the use of force diagrams, described below. 1) Draw a simple diagram including the object of interest, along with everything that is touching, pushing, pulling or otherwise applying force to the object. 2) Label all the significant forces acting on the object of interest, and draw arrows indicating their direction. 3) Establish your coordinate system. If you will be using Cartesian coordinates, establish a line as your x-axis (draw it and label it), choose a point along that line as your origin or zero point, draw a line perpendicular to your x-axis through the origin, and label it the yaxis. Choose your coordinate system in a way that will most simplify your equations; often, this means that the line along which the object is expected to be accelerated is taken to be the x-axis, and the origin is taken to be at the object, where all the forces converge. By choosing an axis aligned with a force, you make the component of that force along the other axis zero, simplifying the math you must do. 4) Find the components of each of the forces with respect to your coordinate system. If the directions of forces converging at the origin are described with angles θ, measured from the positive x-axis, then the x-component Mx of a force with magnitude M will be M cos θ, and the y component My will be M sin θ. 5) Sum up the components of your forces, separately in the x and y directions, and use the resulting equations to solve for the unknown force. If the object is stationary, or moving at constant velocity, these sums will add up to zero; if they do not add up to zero, they add up to the total force being applied to the object. Apparatus Track, ultrasonic motion sensor, force probe, LabQuest Mini, string, and a 1.000 kg or 0.500 kg mass to calibrate the force probe. Cart held in place: 1. Place the track on your table with a significant tilt provided by a few books. 2. Measure the rise and the run of the tilted track and calculate the tilt angle; record these, together with the following measurements and calculations, in table 1 of the lab worksheet. Table 1: Determining Angle of Track Rise, m Hypotenuse, m Angle from Horizontal , degrees 3. Connect the force probe to the LabQuest Mini and the LabQuest Mini to the computer, then run Logger Pro. 4. Press the setup button (clock icon, two to the left of the green start button). Set the duration to one second and the samples/second to 30. 5. Calibrate the force probe. In the top menu bar of Logger Pro, select Experiment – Calibrate – Force Sensor. Apply a known force, click ‘Calibrate’, and enter the magnitude of the known force in Newtons. Do it for both calibrations, with different forces, and click ‘Done’. To apply known forces, known masses may be hung from the force sensor’s hook; when the sensor is in position, with no weight attached, the force is set to be zero. 6. Attach the force probe to the track and tie the cart to the probe’s hook so that the cart can roll on the track with minimal friction, but is prevented from rolling downhill. 7. Record the force from the Logger Pro software. 8. Weigh the cart on a scale, and record its mass. 9. Each student in the group should independently do the following: using the procedure described above for applying Newton’s laws via a force diagram, find a theoretical calculation of the total force on the cart. Each student’s individual work should be signed and included in the diagrams section of the worksheet. Please show all five steps. 10. Compare the theoretical calculated forces in the previous item with the measured force. (Calculate a percent error of the force magnitudes.) Rolling Cart: 1. Use the same setup as in the previous section (don't change the tilt), but disconnect the force probe and attach the motion sensor. 2. Place the motion sensor near the top of the track, release the car, and measure its motion. Make sure someone catches the cart. If necessary, you may roll the cart up the track to get a full second of motion between the ``release'' and the ``catch.'' 3. Copy (by value) all of the experimental data from Logger Pro into the data tab of your worksheet. From this, select the data suitable for analysis, and copy that (by value) into the columns marked selected data; your selection should start at the top of these columns. Use the spreadsheet to make plots of the position and the velocity as a function of time from your selected data. 4. Determine the acceleration of the cart by appropriate fits on each of the graphs. Put these graphs, showing their fits, equations and R2 values, in the graphs tab of the worksheet. 5. Each student in the group should do the following: using the procedure described above for applying Newton's laws via a force diagram, solve for the acceleration down the incline, and calculate it. Each student’s work should be signed and included in the diagrams tab of the worksheet. Please show all five steps. 6. Compare the calculated accelerations in the previous item with the measured acceleration. (Calculate a percent error.) Lab report Submit the lab worksheet as usual. The full lab report, as described in the Lab Report Rubric, is due a week later; it can incorporate the elements from the worksheet - the diagrams, graphs, data and tables – but is expected to reflect any corrections received in the worksheet feedback. You need only present one of your force diagrams and derivations for each experimental case. The experimental and selected data should be included as an appendix at the end of the report. Table 2: Measurements of Cart Mass of Cart, kg Experimental Force, N Theoretical Force, N % Error of Forces, % Theoretical Acceleration, m/s^2 Measured Acceleration, m/s^2 %Error between Theoretical and Measured Acceleration

Tutor Answer

JesseCraig
School: University of Maryland

I have done your work. Thank you.

Running head: Physics Lab Report

1

Physics Lab Report
Student’s name:
Institution affiliation:
Date:

Physics Lab Report

2

Introduction/theory
An object can change its motion, direction or position under an application of a force.
The applied force is normally given by:
F = ma
Where F is the applied force, m is the mass of an object & a is the acceleration that an
object undergoes.
The summation of forces experienced by an object must be equal to zero for an object to
remain at equilibrium i.e. ∑ 𝐹x = 0 & ∑ 𝐹y = 0. This implies that the summation of both
horizontal and vertical forces must be equal ...

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Anonymous
Excellent job

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