Collaborative Learning Community: Classroom Strategies

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timer Asked: Dec 6th, 2017
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Question Description

Share with your group, the procedures, rules, rewards systems, observations, and weekly planner from the previous topic assignments.

In a chart or diagram, compare the similarities and differences between the various elements from each group member.

In 250-500 words, describe the common classroom strategies that the group members determine are appropriate to promote positive teacher and student interactions and based on research.

Use 2-3 scholarly resources.

Prepare this assignment according to the APA guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required.

You are required to submit this assignment to Turnitin.


Attached below will be alot of documents from the various group members that will contain all of the information.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

ECH-525 Weekly Planner Transition Content Area: Transition Time 7:458:00 AM 8:008:30 AM 8:308: 40 Content Area: 8:40- Transition Content Area: Transition Content Area: 9:30 9:309:40 9:4010:20 10:2010:30 10:30 – 11:15 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Put away coats and backpacks Instructional Activity: Breakfast, Do Now Standard: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing Skills 6.B - provide an oral, pictorial, or written response to a text Put away coats and backpacks Instructional Activity: Breakfast, Do Now Standard: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing Skills 6.B - provide an oral, pictorial, or written response to a text Put away coats and backpacks Instructional Activity: Breakfast, Do Now Standard: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing Skills 6.B - provide an oral, pictorial, or written response to a text Put away coats and backpacks Instructional Activity: Breakfast, Do Now Standard: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing Skills 6.B - provide an oral, pictorial, or written response to a text Put away coats and backpacks Instructional Activity: Breakfast, Do Now Standard: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing Skills 6.B - provide an oral, pictorial, or written response to a text Shake hands Instructional Activity: Shared/Guided Reading Standard: Language Skills 2.D- demonstrate print awareness Shake hands Instructional Activity: Shared/Guided Reading Standard: Language Skills 2.D- demonstrate print awareness Shake hands Instructional Activity: Shared/Guided Reading Standard: Language Skills 2.D- demonstrate print awareness Shake hands Instructional Activity: Shared/Guided Reading Standard: Language Skills 2.D- demonstrate print awareness Shake hands Instructional Activity: Shared/Guided Reading Standard: Language Skills 2.D- demonstrate print awareness Sing a song Instructional Activity: Centers Sing a song Instructional Activity: Centers Sing a song Instructional Activity: Centers Sing a song Instructional Activity: Centers Sing a song Instructional Activity: Centers Standard: ELA Knowledge and Skills 1.D work collaboratively with others by following agreedupon rules for discussion, including taking turns. Restroom break, Water break Instructional Activity: Outside Play Standard: ELA Knowledge and Skills 1.D work Standard: ELA Knowledge and Skills 1.D work collaboratively with others by following agreedupon rules for discussion, including taking turns. Restroom break, Water break Instructional Activity: Outside Play Standard: ELA Knowledge and Skills 1.D work Standard: ELA Knowledge and Skills 1.D work collaboratively with others by following agreedupon rules for discussion, including taking turns. Restroom break, Water break Instructional Activity: Outside Play Standard: ELA Knowledge and Skills 1.D work Standard: ELA Knowledge and Skills 1.D work collaboratively with others by following agreedupon rules for discussion, including taking turns. Restroom break, Water break Instructional Activity: Outside Play Standard: ELA Knowledge and Skills 1.D work Standard: ELA Knowledge and Skills 1.D work collaboratively with others by following agreedupon rules for discussion, including taking turns. Restroom break, Water break Instructional Activity: Outside Play Standard: ELA Knowledge and Skills 1.D work © 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. Transition Lunch Transition 11:15 – 11:30 11:30 – 12:15 12:1512:30 Content Area: Transition Content Area: Transition Content Area: 12:301:15 1:151:30 1:302:00 2:002:15 2:152:45 Transition 2:45 – 3:00 collaboratively with others by following agreedupon rules for discussion, including taking turns. Clean up, wash hands get ready for lunch collaboratively with others by following agreedupon rules for discussion, including taking turns. Clean up, wash hands get ready for lunch collaboratively with others by following agreedupon rules for discussion, including taking turns. Clean up, wash hands get ready for lunch collaboratively with others by following agreedupon rules for discussion, including taking turns. Clean up, wash hands get ready for lunch collaboratively with others by following agreedupon rules for discussion, including taking turns. Clean up, wash hands get ready for lunch Restroom break, Water break Instructional Activity: Math Restroom break, Water break Instructional Activity: Math Restroom break, Water break Instructional Activity: Math Restroom break, Water break Instructional Activity: Math Restroom break, Water break Instructional Activity: Math Standard: Knowledge and Skills 2.A count forward and backward to at least 20 with and without objects; Standard: Knowledge and Skills 2.A count forward and backward to at least 20 with and without objects; Standard: Knowledge and Skills 2.A count forward and backward to at least 20 with and without objects; Standard: Knowledge and Skills 2.A count forward and backward to at least 20 with and without objects; Standard: Knowledge and Skills 2.A count forward and backward to at least 20 with and without objects; Dance Instructional Activity: Art Dance Instructional Activity: Art Dance Instructional Activity: Art Dance Instructional Activity: Art Dance Instructional Activity: Art Standard: Knowledge and Skills 2.A create artworks using a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, and forms. Standard: Knowledge and Skills 2.A create artworks using a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, and forms. Standard: Knowledge and Skills 2.A create artworks using a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, and forms. Standard: Knowledge and Skills 2.A create artworks using a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, and forms. Standard: Knowledge and Skills 2.A create artworks using a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, and forms. Exercise Instructional Activity: Social Studies Standard: Knowledge and Skills 4.A use terms, including over, under, near, far, left, and right, to describe relative location. Get backpacks, get ready to go home Exercise Instructional Activity: Social Studies Standard: Knowledge and Skills 4.A use terms, including over, under, near, far, left, and right, to describe relative location. Get backpacks, get ready to go home Exercise Instructional Activity: Social Studies Standard: Knowledge and Skills 4.A use terms, including over, under, near, far, left, and right, to describe relative location. Get backpacks, get ready to go home Exercise Instructional Activity: Social Studies Standard: Knowledge and Skills 4.A use terms, including over, under, near, far, left, and right, to describe relative location. Get backpacks, get ready to go home Exercise Instructional Activity: Social Studies Standard: Knowledge and Skills 4.A use terms, including over, under, near, far, left, and right, to describe relative location. Get backpacks, get ready to go home © 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. Running head: Classroom Dynamics 1 Classroom Dynamics Ashley N. Nunez Grand Canyon University ECH-525 November 21, 2017 Running head: Classroom Dynamics 2 Classroom Dynamics Classroom dynamics are interactions between students and teachers. They are extremely important because they can help students feel comfortable learning and communicating with other students and the classroom teacher. Good classroom dynamics consist of the engagement of everyone inside the classroom, working together to create a harmonious environment that is conducive to learning and teaching (Omatsu, 2014). Inside Mrs. Long’s third grade classroom, located in central Pennsylvania, in a Title I school building, I was able to observe the classroom dynamics in relation to student’s behavior. While inside the classroom I saw teacher interactions with the students, diverse learners, the ethnicity within the classroom as well as the age and gender of the students. There are twenty-one eight and nine-year-old students inside Mrs. Long’s class that I observed for an average of six hours on two separate ocations (Long, 2017). Mrs. Long has a total of thirteen male students and eight female students (Long, 2017). Of these collective twenty-one students six of those have parents that are serving in the military and are stationed in at the local military base in the community. The other twelve students live in a community where sixty-five percent of the population is living in poverty, and out of the two different types of poverty- those students are affected by generational poverty. Mrs. Long explained to me that generational poverty generational poverty affects those who are born into poverty with at least two generations before them that have also lived in poverty (Long, 2017). While observing, I was able to see Mrs. Long work with students in small group settings, large group settings, and with students one-on-one. Mrs. Long has one ELL learner, four students who are pulled out for reading intervention twice a week and three students who are pulled out for Running head: Classroom Dynamics 3 math intervention once a week. Out of the twenty-one students in her classroom, Mrs. Long has eight that are currently on Behavior Intervention Plans. Mrs. Long said that BIPs “is a plan that is designed to reward positive behaviors and teach the wanted behaviors while also teaching the unwanted behaviors” (Long, 2017). I was curious about how difficult it was to have eight students who are using the BIP and if it interrupted her teaching lessons. “At first it can be a difficult process for the student to become acclimated to, however once they are used to the classroom, my rules and the schedule, they are able to ask for breaks when they need them, and I am able to identify most of my students trigger behavior before it escalates” (Long, 2017). Mrs. Long also went on to explain that “their Behavior Plans are unique to them, they are built so they are rewarded with what motivates that specific student” (Long, 2017). While observing in Mrs. Long’s classroom, I was able to experience first hand some of the behaviors, teacher/student interactions and student/student interactions. For example, Mrs. Long was showing the class how to write a persuasive essay. She was providing many examples on the Smartboard as she wrote down why she should leave early on every other Friday to the Principle of the school. As she was writing her persuasive essay, the students were encouraging Mrs. Long with adjectives and phrases that she should use to persuade the Principle to allow Mrs. Long to leave early. The students were excited and eager to help Mrs. Long to be able to get off early, as they know how hard she works. After Mrs. Long was finished with her persuasive essay to the Principle, Mrs. Long then told the students that she wanted them to write her a letter. She gave them two different scenarios to write about, one being to write in pen at school or if you get out of line, should you be able to get back in your spot or should you go to the back of the line? She wanted Running head: Classroom Dynamics 4 them to choose which one they wanted to write about and then persuade her in their writing. Most students, from the reaction of the crown, were very passionate about having to go to the end of the line if you step out of line. They were all to eager to write Mrs. Long a persuasive essay about that! As Mrs. Long is walking around the classroom, I am noticing one student who seems to be doing everything they can to get out of writing. Mrs. Long walks over and asks this student to pull out their writing book and to begin their assignment. As I am watching this, the student takes out the writing book and throws it on the ground. They then pick up their pencil and break it in half and throw the pieces on the floor and in a very angry tone yell that they will not be writing that “stupid” essay. I watch Mrs. Long calmly walk over to the student’s desk and pull out a green folder. She opens up the folder and with her purple pen begins marking on the sheet. This upsets the student even further who then kicks their chair over. Mrs. Long makes her way back over to the student’s desk and bends down to the student’s level and whispers something that I couldn’t make out. As I am watching Mrs. Long and the student’s interactions- I am also taking note of the rest of the classroom. How are the students reacting to this distraction? Are they bothered by it? Do they stop working to watch? I was shocked. Not one student was looking up from their work, they were all writing feverishly and ignoring what was happening in the corner of the room. My attention back to Mrs. Long, whatever she whispered into the student’s ear worked, because they were not sitting in their upright chair, with a whole pencil and their writing book open. I have learned over my time observing in other classrooms that maintaining focused attention in the classroom is imperative for a successful learning environment (Clarke, November 2016). The loss of instructional time, or distractions due to off task behavior is quite the challenge, however Mrs. Long handled the distraction with ease and grace (Bradley, 2014). She didn’t let it Running head: Classroom Dynamics 5 upset her, affect her or her classroom. I guess being an educator for eighteen years, she has learned strategies to aid in every situation that could possibly arise. Overall, my time observing in Mrs. Long’s classroom on the demographics, student behavior, teacher/student interaction were very educational and inspiring. Mrs. Long showed me that being an educator with, so many diverse learners are not easy, yet it is manageable. When I am in my own classroom, I will be more than happy to mirror the strategies, techniques and grace Mrs. Long showed me while I was observing her classroom dynamics. Running head: Classroom Dynamics 6 References Bradley, C. (2014). Decreasing Off-Task Behaviors in an Elementary Classroom . Masters of Arts in Education Action Research Papers, Paper 47. Clarke, M. (November 2016). Managing Classroom Dynamics . Oxford University Press. Long, T. (2017, November 21). Oberservation Interview; ECH525 . (A. Nunez, Interviewer) Omatsu, G. (2014). Understanding Classroom Dynamics. CSUN Journal. Instructor Loring, I will be completing my practicum hours in a third-grade classroom. The ages of the students are between eight and nine years old. Thank youAshley N. Nunez Running head: Academic Play, Classroom Schedule, and Transitions Academic Play, Classroom Schedule, and Transitions Ashley Nunez Grand Canyon University ECH-525 November 29, 2017 © 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. 1 Running head: Academic Play, Classroom Schedule, and Transitions 2 Academic Play, Classroom Schedule, and Transitions Routines and schedules are important for students because they help them transition from one activity to another during the day. Schedules and routines provide students security and eliminates some anxiety of not knowing what is coming next. When schedules are consistent, students can learn patterns and once the pattern is set, the student is able to inter (Tanya L. Eckert, 2008). For example, I was observing in Mrs. Long’s third grade classroom every transition they had the students knew exactly what routine and activity that they were to do next. The routines that Mrs. Long has set up in her classroom has created routines that take the guess work on a daily basis. Rather her schedule has created a smooth routine for herself and her students that make for a harmonious community. Observation I was able to overserve many transitions in the classroom that started at the beginning of the day. The students came into the classroom at the beginning of the school day, putting away their belongings. They made their lunch choice and began eating their breakfast, while beginning their morning work and waiting on the morning announcements. Mrs. Long did not have to remind any student of this, as they all were performing all of this on their own, as they knew the routine. The students also knew that after the morning announcements was the time that they started to line up for specials. As the students transitioned to specials, I was able to stay behind and take note of the classroom, and the schedules Mrs. Long had posted in the room. At the front of the classroom, Mrs. Long has a large interchangeable schedule that she is able to change. She changes the specials on which ever cycle day they are on. The schedule is in written in large bold black font that every student can see from any corner of the room. It has a fun, funky background that is appealing to the eye as well. As the students were transitioning back from specials, they stop by the restrooms from a bathroom and water break before heading back to the classroom. Once back inside the classroom, Mrs. Long begins Language © 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. Running head: Academic Play, Classroom Schedule, and Transitions 3 Arts. She instructs the students to pull out their Journals and to begin writing about what they did over their Thanksgiving break. When students are given the opportunity to free write allows students that personal and emotional aspects of “self”. Free writing fosters uninhibited thoughts, because students know that they are not going to be graded. They also know that there are no rules for their writing such as grammar, punctuation and spelling, so they are “free” to write how they feel, what they feel and when they feel it (Joseph Defazio, 2010). After the students completed their journal entrees, it was time to begin the “Daily Five”. This is a literacy program that is used in Pennsylvania that helps students develop their reading, writing, literacy, working independency and with their peers. The five components of the Daily Five consist of reading to self, reading to someone else, listening to reading, word work and writing (Boushey, 2006). Each station has a form of one of these activities on them, and each station had a group of students. Mrs. Long also was working with a small group of students, and the students rotated in a rotation of fifth teen minutes. Conclusion Overall, my time observing in Mrs. Long’s third grade classroom was a very positive experience. I felt that Mrs. Long created a very well organized and supportive learning environment for her students. I noticed throughout the day that her schedule that she had created helped the students transition easily after each activity and the visual schedule that was displayed in the classroom was a great tool for the students to reference if they needed any reminders. As for the behaviors and reminders in Mrs. Long’s class, I felt that she did a great job at redirecting her students with positive reinforcement instead of using negative comments or energy. Mrs. Longs classroom has a very positive energy and always feels very welcoming anytime I come in to observe. The students are always engaged and smiling, happy to be in the classroom with a teacher that is happy and excited to have them as her students. © 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. 4 Running head: Academic Play, Classroom Schedule, and Transitions ECH-525 Weekly Planner Transition Time Monday 8:25 Doors Open Instructional Activity: Specials/Library looking for a book Standard: AL.1.2.A: Explore and ask questions to seek meaningful information about a range of topics and ideas. Doors Open Instructional Activity: Specials/Art painting a picture Standard: 91.V2.E: Use imagination and creativity to express self through works of art Doors Open Instructional Activity: Specials/P.E. Playing games Standard: 10.12.D: Distinguish between healthy and unhealthy behaviors 10.42.B: Exhibit stamina, balance, strength and agility Doors Open Instructional Activity: Specials/Music Learnin ...
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