Humanities
Argument Analysis

Question Description

(Read Two Article Attached below)

On one view, what determines how well your life is going is what feelings or sensations you have had over the course of your life. Nozick’s “experience machine” is often taken to refute that view. For it seems that, according to the view in question, a life spent hooked up to the experience machine would be a fantastic life—one that was going extraordinarily well. Yet it does not seem that it really would be a great life. It seems that a life hooked up to the experience machine would in fact be bad for the person plugged in to it.

Assuming that plugging in to the experience machine would be bad for you, why would it be bad for you? Kagan writes, “A natural response to these examples—the deceived businessman, the experience machine—is that these people don’t really have what they want. They think they do, but they don’t” (257). In your paper, first, explain why Kagan says that someone who is hooked into the experience machine does not really have what they want.

Second, the idea that getting what you want is the key to having your life go well is what the desire or preference theory of well-being claims. Kagan discusses a number of different versions of this theory. What does the unrestricted preference theory say, and why does Kagan think that it is false? What does the restricted preference theory say, and what problem does Kagan think it has? Finally, what does the ideal restricted preference theory claim? Do you think that theory is true? If not, why not?

1. . Introduction paragraph have a sophisticated thesis reveals an in-depth analysis of the text and give appropriate background information. Innovative, original introduction that indicates writer’s grasp of topic, purpose and audience. Clearly lay out the main things you will do in the paper.

2. Body paragraph include:

Explain why Kagan says that someone who is hooked into the experience machine does not really have what they want

Describes the unrestricted preference theory, and explains why Kagan thinks that it is false?

Discuss the restricted preference theory, and why Kagan thinks that it is false

Discuss the ideal restricted preference theory,

MAKE YOUR ARGUMENT ACCURATE AND CLEARLY, and make it insightful/thoughtful?

3. Conclusion leaving reader satisfied and thinking. Mastery of conventions: no spelling, punctuation or format errors

Repeat thesis statement, and is author argument sound? do you agree and disagree? why?

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Username: Ari KrupnickBook: Ethical Theory: An Anthology, 2nd Edition. No part of any book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means without the publisher's prior written permission. Use (other than pursuant to the qualified fair use privilege) in violation of the law or these Terms of Service is prohibited. Violators will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. Username: Ari KrupnickBook: Ethical Theory: An Anthology, 2nd Edition. No part of any book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means without the publisher's prior written permission. Use (other than pursuant to the qualified fair use privilege) in violation of the law or these Terms of Service is prohibited. Violators will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. 7060613 2015/02/03 209.129.168.31 Username: Ari KrupnickBook: Ethical Theory: An Anthology, 2nd Edition. No part of any book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means without the publisher's prior written permission. Use (other than pursuant to the qualified fair use privilege) in violation of the law or these Terms of Service is prohibited. Violators will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. Username: Ari KrupnickBook: Ethical Theory: An Anthology, 2nd Edition. No part of any book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means without the publisher's prior written permission. Use (other than pursuant to the qualified fair use privilege) in violation of the law or these Terms of Service is prohibited. Violators will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. 7060613 2015/02/03 209.129.168.31 ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

Running head: ARGUMENT ANALYSIS

1

Argument Analysis
Name
Institution

ARGUMENT ANALYSIS

2
Argument Analysis

“If wishes were horses, beggars would ride” is the popular saying used to describe the
difficulty of getting what we want anything we desire them. Why it is impossible for people to
fulfill all their desires is quite a baffling phenomenon because of the notion that the relentless
pursuit of a goal usually pays off at the end of the day. As one ponders on the explanation for the
occurrence, it is necessary to note that some people consider the quality and quantity of the
experiences as a reflection of good well being and a more valuable asset than the anything
money can buy. However, this is not the reality of what a meaningful life because experts have
concluded that that experiences derived from doing these activities and several others that give
happiness are just a part of the needs of human and not a complete representation of the reality of
his life (Nozick, 2013). ...

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