Assignment 5: Persuasive Paper Part 3: Possible Disadvantages, Answers, with Visuals

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Attached are the instructions for Assignment 5 (final one), the grading scale, the professor's feedback for assignment 4 (190 of 200), and a copy of Assignment 4. Thank you, please let me know if additional resources are needed.

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1. Students, please view the "Submit a Clickable Rubric Assignment" in the Student Center. Instructors, training on how to grade is within the Instructor Center. Assignment 5: Persuasive Paper Part 3: Possible Disadvantages, Answers, with Visuals Due Week 10 and worth 250 points Using feedback from your professor and classmates, revise Parts 1 and 2, and add Part 3. Plan to include visuals to illustrate the advantages of your proposed solution. Write an eight to ten (8-10) page paper in which you: Provide Part I: Revision of A Problem Exists (3-4 pages) 1. Revise your Persuasive Paper Part 1: A Problem Exists, using feedback from the professor and classmates. Provide Part 2: Revision of Part 2: Solution to Problem and Advantages (3-4 pages) 2. Revise your Persuasive Paper Part 2: Solution to Problem and Advantages, using feedback from the professor and classmates. Develop Part 3: Possible Disadvantages, Answers, with Visuals (1-2 pages, for 7-9 total pages) 3. Included a defensible, relevant thesis statement in the first paragraph. 4. State, explain, and support the first disadvantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution and provide a logical answer. This should be one (1) paragraph. 5. State, explain, and support the second (and third if desired) disadvantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution and provide a logical answer. This should be one or two (12) paragraphs. 6. Include one or two (1-2) relevant visuals that help illustrate an advantage. 7. Use effective transitional words, phrases, and sentences. 8. Provide a concluding paragraph to summarize the proposed solution, its advantages, possible disadvantages, and answers to the disadvantages. Repeat or paraphrase your thesis statement. 9. Develop a coherently structured paper with an introduction, body, and conclusion. 10. Use one (1) or more rhetorical strategy (ethos, logos, pathos) to explain claims. 11. Support disadvantages and answers with at least two (2) additional quality relevant references. Use at least eight (8) total for Parts 1, 2, and 3. Note: Wikipedia and other Websites do not qualify as academic resources. Your assignment must follow these formatting guidelines: • • Be typed, double spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides; citations and references must follow APA or schoolspecific format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions. Include a cover page containing the title of the assignment, the student’s name, the professor’s name, the course title, and the date. The cover page and the reference page are not included in the required assignment page length. Note: Submit your assignment to the designated plagiarism program so that you can make revisions before submitting your paper to your professor. The specific course learning outcomes associated with this assignment are: • • • • • • • • • Recognize the elements and correct use of a thesis statement. Associate the features of audience, purpose, and text with various genres. Analyze the rhetorical strategies of ethos, pathos, logos in writing samples and for incorporation into essays or presentations. Correct grammatical and stylistic errors consistent with Standard Written English. Prepare a research project that supports an argument with structure and format appropriate to the genre. Revise drafts to improve clarity, support, and organization. Recognize how to organize ideas with transitional words, phrases, and sentences. Incorporate relevant, properly documented sources to substantiate ideas. Use technology and information resources to research selected issues for this course. Write clearly and concisely about selected topics using proper writing mechanics. Click here to view the grading rubric for this assignment Rubric Detail A rubric lists grading criteria that instructors use to evaluate student work. Your instructor linked a rubric to this item and made it available to you. Select Grid View or List View to change the rubric's layout. Content Top of Form Name: ENG215 Week 7 Assignment 4: Persuasive Paper Part 2 - Solution and Advantages Description: ENG215 Week 7 Assignment 4: Persuasive Paper Part 2 - Solution and Advantages Grid View List View Unacceptable Below 60% F ENG215-A41 1. Revise, using feedback from the professor and classmates, your Persuasive Paper Part 1: A Problem Exists. Weight: 5% Meets Minimum Expectations 60- Fair 70-79% C 69% D Proficient 8089% B Points: Points: Points: Points: Points Range: 0 (0%) - 5.98 (2.99%) Points Range: 6 (3%) - 6.98 (3.49%) Points Range: 7 (3.5%) - 7.98 (3.99%) Points Range: 8 (4%) - 8.98 (4.49%) Did not submit or incompletel y revised, using feedback from the professor and classmates, your Insufficientl y revised, using feedback from the professor and classmates, your Persuasive Paper Part Partially revised, using feedback from the professor and classmates, your Persuasive Paper Part Satisfactoril y revised, using feedback from the professor and classmates, your Persuasive Paper Part Exemplary 90100% A Points: 9.5 (4.75%) Points Range: 9 (4.5%) - 10 (5%) Thoroughly revised, using feedback from the professor and classmates, your Persuasive Unacceptable Below 60% F Persuasive Paper Part 1: A Problem Exists. Meets Minimum Expectations 60- Fair 70-79% C 69% D Proficient 8089% B Exemplary 90100% A Paper Part 1: A Problem Exists. 1: A Problem Exists. 1: A Problem Exists. 1: A Problem Exists. Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Points: ENG215-A42 2. Include a defensible, relevant thesis statement clearly in the first paragraph. Weight: 5% Points: Points: Points: Points Range: 6 (3%) - 6.98 (3.49%) Points Range: 7 (3.5%) - 7.98 (3.99%) Points Range: 8 (4%) - 8.98 (4.49%) Insufficientl y included a defensible, relevant thesis statement clearly in the first paragraph. Partially included a defensible, relevant thesis statement clearly in the first paragraph. Satisfactoril y included a defensible, relevant thesis statement clearly in the first paragraph. Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Points: Points: Points: Points: Points Range: 0 (0%) - 5.98 (2.99%) Points Range: 6 (3%) - 6.98 (3.49%) Points Range: 7 (3.5%) - 7.98 (3.99%) Points Range: 8 (4%) - 8.98 (4.49%) Did not submit or Insufficientl y explained, Partially explained, Satisfactoril y explained, Points Range: 0 (0%) - 5.98 (2.99%) Did not submit or incompletel y included a defensible, relevant thesis statement clearly in the first paragraph. Feedback: ENG215-A43 3. Explain a detailed, viable solution that supports your thesis. This should Points: 9.5 (4.75%) Points Range: 9 (4.5%) - 10 (5%) Thoroughly included a defensible, relevant thesis statement clearly in the first paragraph. Feedback: Points: 9.5 (4.75%) Points Range: 9 (4.5%) - 10 (5%) Unacceptable Below 60% F be one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Weight: 5% incompletel y explained, in one or two (1-2) paragraphs, a detailed, viable solution that supports your thesis. Meets Minimum Expectations 60- Fair 70-79% C 69% D Proficient 8089% B Exemplary 90100% A Thoroughly explained, in one or two (1-2) paragraphs, a detailed, viable solution that supports your thesis. in one or two (1-2) paragraphs, a detailed, viable solution that supports your thesis. in one or two (1-2) paragraphs, a detailed, viable solution that supports your thesis. in one or two (1-2) paragraphs, a detailed, viable solution that supports your thesis. Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: ENG215-A44 4. State, explain, and support the first advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution. This should be one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Weight: 10% Feedback: Points: Points: Points: Points: Points Range: 0 (0%) - 11.98 (5.99%) Points Range: 12 (6%) - 13.98 (6.99%) Points Range: 14 (7%) - 15.98 (7.99%) Points Range: 16 (8%) - 17.98 (8.99%) Did not submit or incompletel y stated, explained, and supported the first advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your Insufficientl y stated, explained, and supported the first advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution in one or two Partially stated, explained, and supported the first advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution in one or two Satisfactoril y stated, explained, and supported the first advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution in one or two Points: 19 (9.5%) Points Range: 18 (9%) - 20 (10%) Thoroughly stated, explained, and supported the first advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution in Unacceptable Below 60% F solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Meets Minimum Expectations 60- Fair 70-79% C 69% D Proficient 8089% B Exemplary 90100% A one or two (1-2) paragraphs. (1-2) paragraphs. (1-2) paragraphs. (1-2) paragraphs. Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Points: ENG215-A45 5. State, explain, and support the second advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution. This should be one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Weight: 10% Points Range: 0 (0%) - 11.98 (5.99%) Did not submit or incompletel y stated, explained, and supported the second advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Feedback: Points: Points: Points: Points Range: 12 (6%) - 13.98 (6.99%) Points Range: 14 (7%) - 15.98 (7.99%) Points Range: 16 (8%) - 17.98 (8.99%) Insufficientl y stated, explained, and supported the second advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Partially stated, explained, and supported the second advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Satisfactoril y stated, explained, and supported the second advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Points: 19 (9.5%) Points Range: 18 (9%) - 20 (10%) Thoroughly stated, explained, and supported the second advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Feedback: Unacceptable Below 60% F Meets Minimum Expectations 60- Fair 70-79% C 69% D Proficient 8089% B Points: ENG215-A47 6. State, explain, and support the third (and fourth if desired) advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution. This should be one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Weight: 10% Points: Points: Points: Points Range: 12 (6%) - 13.98 (6.99%) Points Range: 14 (7%) - 15.98 (7.99%) Points Range: 16 (8%) - 17.98 (8.99%) Insufficientl y stated, explained, and supported the third advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Partially stated, explained, and supported the third advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Satisfactoril y stated, explained, and supported the third advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Points: Points: Points: Points: Points Range: 0 (0%) - 11.98 (5.99%) Points Range: 12 (6%) - 13.98 (6.99%) Points Range: 14 (7%) - 15.98 (7.99%) Points Range: 16 (8%) - 17.98 (8.99%) Points Range: 0 (0%) - 11.98 (5.99%) Did not submit or incompletel y stated, explained, and supported the third advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Feedback: ENG215-A48 7. Provide a concluding paragraph / transitional paragraph Exemplary 90100% A Points: 19 (9.5%) Points Range: 18 (9%) - 20 (10%) Thoroughly stated, explained, and supported the third advantage (economic, social, political, environmen tal, social, equitable, ethical/mor al, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Feedback: Points: 19 (9.5%) Points Range: 18 (9%) - 20 (10%) Unacceptable Below 60% F that summarizes the proposed solution and its advantages. Weight:10% Did not submit or incompletel y provided a concluding paragraph / transitional paragraph that summarizes the proposed solution and its advantages. Meets Minimum Expectations 60- Fair 70-79% C 69% D Proficient 8089% B Exemplary 90100% A Insufficientl y provided a concluding paragraph / transitional paragraph that summarizes the proposed solution and its advantages. Partially provided a concluding paragraph / transitional paragraph that summarizes the proposed solution and its advantages. Satisfactoril y provided a concluding paragraph / transitional paragraph that summarizes the proposed solution and its advantages. Thoroughly provided a concluding paragraph / transitional paragraph that summarizes the proposed solution and its advantages. Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Points: Points: Points: Points: Points: 19 (9.5%) Points Range: 0 (0%) - 11.98 (5.99%) Points Range: 12 (6%) - 13.98 (6.99%) Points Range: 14 (7%) - 15.98 (7.99%) Points Range: 16 (8%) - 17.98 (8.99%) Did not submit or incompletel y developed a coherently structured paper with an introduction , body, and conclusion. Insufficientl y developed a coherently structured paper with an introduction , body, and conclusion. Partially developed a coherently structured paper with an introduction , body, and conclusion. Satisfactoril y developed a coherently structured paper with an introduction , body, and conclusion. Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: ENG215-A49 8. Develop a coherently structured paper with effective transitional words, phrases, sentences and an introduction , body, and conclusion. Weight: 10% Points Range: 18 (9%) - 20 (10%) Thoroughly developed a coherently structured paper with an introduction , body, and conclusion. Feedback: Unacceptable Below 60% F Meets Minimum Expectations 60- Fair 70-79% C 69% D Proficient 8089% B Exemplary 90100% A Feedback: ENG215-A410 9. Support advantage claims with at least three (3) additional quality relevant references (at least six (6) total for Parts 1 and 2). Weight: 10% ENG215-A411 10. Clarity, writing mechanics, and formatting requirement s Weight: 25% Points: Points: Points Range: 12 (6%) - 13.98 (6.99%) Points Range: 14 (7%) - 15.98 (7.99%) Does not meet the required number of references; all references poor quality choices. Does not meet the required number of references; some references poor quality choices. Feedback: Feedback: Points: Points: Points: Points: Points Range: 0 (0%) - 29.98 (14.99%) Points Range: 30 (15%) 34.98 (17.49%) Points Range: 35 (17.5%) 39.98 (19.99%) Points Range: 40 (20%) 44.98 (22.49%) More than 8 errors present 7-8 errors present 5-6 errors present 3-4 errors present 0-2 errors present Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Feedback: Points: Points Range: 0 (0%) - 11.98 (5.99%) No references provided Feedback: Show Descriptions Points: Points Range: 16 (8%) - 17.98 (8.99%) Meets number of required references; most references high quality choices. Feedback: Points: 19 (9.5%) Points Range: 18 (9%) - 20 (10%) Meets number of required references; all references high quality choices. Feedback: Points: 47.5 (23.75%) Points Range: 45 (22.5%) - 50 (25%) Show Feedback ENG215-A4-1 1. Revise, using feedback from the professor and classmates, your Persuasive Paper Part 1: A Problem Exists. Weight: 5%-Levels of Achievement: Unacceptable Below 60% F 0 (0%) - 5.98 (2.99%) Did not submit or incompletely revised, using feedback from the professor and classmates, your Persuasive Paper Part 1: A Problem Exists. Meets Minimum Expectations 60-69% D 6 (3%) - 6.98 (3.49%) Insufficiently revised, using feedback from the professor and classmates, your Persuasive Paper Part 1: A Problem Exists. Fair 70-79% C 7 (3.5%) - 7.98 (3.99%) Partially revised, using feedback from the professor and classmates, your Persuasive Paper Part 1: A Problem Exists. Proficient 80-89% B 8 (4%) - 8.98 (4.49%) Satisfactorily revised, using feedback from the professor and classmates, your Persuasive Paper Part 1: A Problem Exists. Exemplary 90-100% A 9 (4.5%) - 10 (5%) Thoroughly revised, using feedback from the professor and classmates, your Persuasive Paper Part 1: A Problem Exists. Feedback: ENG215-A4-2 2. Include a defensible, relevant thesis statement clearly in the first paragraph. Weight: 5%-Levels of Achievement: Unacceptable Below 60% F 0 (0%) - 5.98 (2.99%) Did not submit or incompletely included a defensible, relevant thesis statement clearly in the first paragraph. Meets Minimum Expectations 60-69% D 6 (3%) - 6.98 (3.49%) Insufficiently included a defensible, relevant thesis statement clearly in the first paragraph. Fair 70-79% C 7 (3.5%) - 7.98 (3.99%) Partially included a defensible, relevant thesis statement clearly in the first paragraph. Proficient 80-89% B 8 (4%) - 8.98 (4.49%) Satisfactorily included a defensible, relevant thesis statement clearly in the first paragraph. Exemplary 90-100% A 9 (4.5%) - 10 (5%) Thoroughly included a defensible, relevant thesis statement clearly in the first paragraph. Feedback: ENG215-A4-3 3. Explain a detailed, viable solution that supports your thesis. This should be one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Weight: 5%-Levels of Achievement: Unacceptable Below 60% F 0 (0%) - 5.98 (2.99%) Did not submit or incompletely explained, in one or two (1-2) paragraphs, a detailed, viable solution that supports your thesis. Meets Minimum Expectations 60-69% D 6 (3%) - 6.98 (3.49%) Insufficiently explained, in one or two (1-2) paragraphs, a detailed, viable solution that supports your thesis. Fair 70-79% C 7 (3.5%) - 7.98 (3.99%) Partially explained, in one or two (1-2) paragraphs, a detailed, viable solution that supports your thesis. Proficient 80-89% B 8 (4%) - 8.98 (4.49%) Satisfactorily explained, in one or two (1-2) paragraphs, a detailed, viable solution that supports your thesis. Exemplary 90-100% A 9 (4.5%) - 10 (5%) Thoroughly explained, in one or two (1-2) paragraphs, a detailed, viable solution that supports your thesis. Feedback: ENG215-A4-4 4. State, explain, and support the first advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution. This should be one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Weight: 10%-Levels of Achievement: Unacceptable Below 60% F 0 (0%) - 11.98 (5.99%) Did not submit or incompletely stated, explained, and supported the first advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Meets Minimum Expectations 60-69% D 12 (6%) - 13.98 (6.99%) Insufficiently stated, explained, and supported the first advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Fair 70-79% C 14 (7%) - 15.98 (7.99%) Partially stated, explained, and supported the first advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Proficient 80-89% B 16 (8%) - 17.98 (8.99%) Satisfactorily stated, explained, and supported the first advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Exemplary 90-100% A 18 (9%) - 20 (10%) Thoroughly stated, explained, and supported the first advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Feedback: ENG215-A4-5 5. State, explain, and support the second advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution. This should be one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Weight: 10%-Levels of Achievement: Unacceptable Below 60% F 0 (0%) - 11.98 (5.99%) Did not submit or incompletely stated, explained, and supported the second advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Meets Minimum Expectations 60-69% D 12 (6%) - 13.98 (6.99%) Insufficiently stated, explained, and supported the second advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Fair 70-79% C 14 (7%) - 15.98 (7.99%) Partially stated, explained, and supported the second advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Proficient 80-89% B 16 (8%) - 17.98 (8.99%) Satisfactorily stated, explained, and supported the second advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Exemplary 90-100% A 18 (9%) - 20 (10%) Thoroughly stated, explained, and supported the second advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Feedback: ENG215-A4-7 6. State, explain, and support the third (and fourth if desired) advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution. This should be one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Weight: 10%-Levels of Achievement: Unacceptable Below 60% F 0 (0%) - 11.98 (5.99%) Did not submit or incompletely stated, explained, and supported the third advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Meets Minimum Expectations 60-69% D 12 (6%) - 13.98 (6.99%) Insufficiently stated, explained, and supported the third advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Fair 70-79% C 14 (7%) - 15.98 (7.99%) Partially stated, explained, and supported the third advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Proficient 80-89% B 16 (8%) - 17.98 (8.99%) Satisfactorily stated, explained, and supported the third advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Exemplary 90-100% A 18 (9%) - 20 (10%) Thoroughly stated, explained, and supported the third advantage (economic, social, political, environmental, social, equitable, ethical/moral, etc.) to your solution in one or two (1-2) paragraphs. Feedback: ENG215-A4-8 7. Provide a concluding paragraph / transitional paragraph that summarizes the proposed solution and its advantages. Weight:10%-Levels of Achievement: Unacceptable Below 60% F 0 (0%) - 11.98 (5.99%) Did not submit or incompletely provided a concluding paragraph / transitional paragraph that summarizes the proposed solution and its advantages. Meets Minimum Expectations 60-69% D 12 (6%) - 13.98 (6.99%) Insufficiently provided a concluding paragraph / transitional paragraph that summarizes the proposed solution and its advantages. Fair 70-79% C 14 (7%) - 15.98 (7.99%) Partially provided a concluding paragraph / transitional paragraph that summarizes the proposed solution and its advantages. Proficient 80-89% B 16 (8%) - 17.98 (8.99%) Satisfactorily provided a concluding paragraph / transitional paragraph that summarizes the proposed solution and its advantages. Exemplary 90-100% A 18 (9%) - 20 (10%) Thoroughly provided a concluding paragraph / transitional paragraph that summarizes the proposed solution and its advantages. Feedback: ENG215-A4-9 8. Develop a coherently structured paper with effective transitional words, phrases, sentences and an introduction, body, and conclusion. Weight: 10%-Levels of Achievement: Unacceptable Below 60% F 0 (0%) - 11.98 (5.99%) Did not submit or incompletely developed a coherently structured paper with an introduction, body, and conclusion. Meets Minimum Expectations 60-69% D 12 (6%) - 13.98 (6.99%) Insufficiently developed a coherently structured paper with an introduction, body, and conclusion. Fair 70-79% C 14 (7%) - 15.98 (7.99%) Partially developed a coherently structured paper with an introduction, body, and conclusion. Proficient 80-89% B 16 (8%) - 17.98 (8.99%) Satisfactorily developed a coherently structured paper with an introduction, body, and conclusion. Exemplary 90-100% A 18 (9%) - 20 (10%) Thoroughly developed a coherently structured paper with an introduction, body, and conclusion. Feedback: ENG215-A4-10 9. Support advantage claims with at least three (3) additional quality relevant references (at least six (6) total for Parts 1 and 2). Weight: 10%-Levels of Achievement: Unacceptable Below 60% F 0 (0%) - 11.98 (5.99%) No references provided Meets Minimum Expectations 60-69% D 12 (6%) - 13.98 (6.99%) Does not meet the required number of references; all references poor quality choices. Fair 70-79% C 14 (7%) - 15.98 (7.99%) Does not meet the required number of references; some references poor quality choices. Proficient 80-89% B 16 (8%) - 17.98 (8.99%) Meets number of required references; most references high quality choices. Exemplary 90-100% A 18 (9%) - 20 (10%) Meets number of required references; all references high quality choices. Feedback: ENG215-A4-11 10. Clarity, writing mechanics, and formatting requirements Weight: 25%-Levels of Achievement: Unacceptable Below 60% F 0 (0%) - 29.98 (14.99%) More than 8 errors present Meets Minimum Expectations 60-69% D 30 (15%) - 34.98 (17.49%) 7-8 errors present Fair 70-79% C 35 (17.5%) - 39.98 (19.99%) 5-6 errors present Proficient 80-89% B 40 (20%) - 44.98 (22.49%) 3-4 errors present Exemplary 90-100% A 45 (22.5%) - 50 (25%) 0-2 errors present Feedback: Raw Total: 190.00 (of 200.0) Feedback to Learner Name:ENG215 Week 7 Assignment 4: Persuasive Paper Part 2 - Solution and Advantages Description:ENG215 Week 7 Assignment 4: Persuasive Paper Part 2 - Solution and Advantages Bottom of Form Professor’s Feedback Nice job here!, I see this meets the 6-8 page minimum, and you have the revisions from part one. In part two, you explored the solution and advantages well. You included a relevant thesis in the first paragraph with a detailed solution that supported it in the next paragraph. You explained the first, second and third advantages to your solution in the subsequent three paragraphs, you use effective transitional words, and your concluding paragraph summarizes your solution along with the advantages. Overall, your paper is nicely structured with an intro, a body, and a conclusion, and your References Page contains the appropriate six total references. You also have little grammatical/spelling errors here. Great work with this! Running head: PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH EXAM CHEATING Problems Associated with Exam Cheating Fanessa M. Sellers Professor Rachel Gruskin ENG 215 Research and Writing November 23, 2017 1 PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH EXAM CHEATING 2 Problems Associated with Exam Cheating More than 60% of college students have cheated in college examinations at one point in their lives. More than 20% do not regret it and thus become regular cheaters attaining GPAs that are not rightfully theirs (Beasly, 2014). This trend is very worrying because the industries get more than 20% of cheaters and a workforce that does not rightfully qualify to be where it is. Therefore, the problem of cheating in colleges is a big one, and it deserves serious actions. The most severe punishment that a student can get for cheating is discontinuation from the program that he or she is undertaking and out of the university as well. Expelling students who cheat in examinations will help to bring a serious consideration of the consequences of cheating and thus discourage the malpractice. Examination cheating can be simply explained as an effort to acquire grades using shortcuts and the failure to depend on one's knowledge to pass tests. According to Dick et al. (2002), examination cheating is a result of attaching a lot of value to the tests that are administered to students. Further, it can also be viewed as a response to the pressure to perform whereby people who feel pressured to provide positive results are more likely to cheat on their tests than those who feel less pressured. In a wider view, examination cheating can be viewed as a result of the challenges associated with obtaining higher education. As a means of getting into depth with the issue of cheating, it is necessary to examine several fundamental questions. The first problem that requires exploring is how the hardships of getting a higher education may contribute towards the malpractice. This first issue is more of an economic problem. Secondly, it is necessary to understand the ethical implications of cheating and how it may affect the morals of both the perpetrators and other students. Finally, it is also necessary to know the organizational challenges such as enablers in the school environment that PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH EXAM CHEATING 3 may foster cheating in the first place. These three wide problems must be considered if cheating is to be curbed in colleges and other institutions of higher learning. First and foremost, the economic problem of the challenges of obtaining higher education in the country can be said to be a major contributing factor towards the issue of cheating. There are several difficulties in obtaining a higher education that may foster the development of the malpractice. Most universities in the U.S are expensive for an average citizen. Therefore, once a person is in such an institution, it becomes extremely important to retain their position. Therefore, non-performing students may be tempted to result in cheating as a means of helping them to achieve better grades. This desperate situation is what Hamlin et al. (2013) dictate as the leading factor in cheating. When students have invested a high amount of time and money into their education, they feel obliged to perform because failing would mean a failed investment. The second problem affecting cheating malpractices is the ethical and moral implications that cheating may produce. It is evident, according to Kusnoor and Falik (2013), that a cheater erodes the morals in the test and rids himself of integrity. The lack of integrity in any activity means that a person cannot be trusted and they are often more likely to be corrupt than do the right and just thing. Therefore, when a person cheats, it shows they cannot be trusted and must be under close supervision in whatever he does. Employers also lose faith in the graduates that the institutions provide. When cheating is rampant, employers are in constant fear of employing unqualified employees. Further, they fear that the people that they employ may apply the same unprofessional methods of achieving results. Therefore, it is necessary that the integrity of the systems is preserved so that employers have trust in higher education systems. The students' economic statuses and the moral repercussions contribute towards cheating, but the organizations contribute to the problem as well. The third issue associated with cheating PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH EXAM CHEATING 4 is the economic resources of the institutions of higher education. This is a major contributor towards cheating. Institutions that lack enough funds to pay their lecturers well may discourage them from delivering quality education. Members of the faculty who are not well motivated may end up presenting insufficient content to their students. In that case, when students are not well equipped for their tests, they are more likely to panic and try to achieve results through other means. According to Kusnoor and Falik (2013), the pressure for students to perform is partly because of the inability to perform well under normal circumstances. While still on the organizational challenges, the social scope of higher education institutions appear as a result of cheating and sometimes lead to cheating. For instance, Hamlin et al. (2013) discovered that the course organization affects the students’ willingness to cheat in their examinations. When the course is poorly organized, students are more likely to lose hope in making anything out of the course content and result in cheating instead. This disorganization of the course material is just one of the many enablers that direct students to cheating. Another example would be the sitting arrangement whereby crowding allows the malpractice to develop in the examination setting. Issues such as the lack of supervision are also to be faulted for enabling students who partake in the malpractice. It is thus evident that the institutions play a critical role in the cheating habits of the students. A serious reconsideration of expulsion as a punishment for cheating in tests may present the malpractice as critical thus gaining the attention of the students. Several problems arise from cheating. The first is the ethical issue that arises from the cheating parties. It is often seen as unfair when a student does their best but gets a worse grade than another student who just cheated on their test. Further, employees lose their confidence in graduates who come from institutions which have been linked with exam cheating. Another problem that could be causing PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH EXAM CHEATING 5 cheating is the economic implications of the education system. Getting a degree in the U.S is expensive. People invest a lot of money in their education, and that leads them to use any means to pass their tests and make their money count. Furthermore, institutions that struggle with poor pay for lecturers encourage cheating because unmotivated educators are likely to be reluctant to supervise students or even teach efficiently. A critical approach to the issue of cheating in higher education institutions can provide a solution to the current problems in the system. Solution to Cheating in College The workforce is receiving less than satisfactory results from institutions of higher education due to the rampant cheating that has been witnessed. Therefore, the biggest problem is that there is a general loss of faith in the graduates that are joining the industry. Therefore, to curb this problem, expelling students who are caught cheating will serve as a warning to others and also reduce the issue of cheating. This solution is tough, but it presents the only available solution to save the reputation of colleges and universities and restore the dignity that was once accustomed to receiving a degree from an institution of higher education. Expelling cheating students will restore the dignity of higher education, increase the economic returns of educational institutions, and promote equality in the society. Expelling students who cheat is one sure way of ensuring that the reputation of the students, institutions and even the system as a whole is restored. According to Abasi and Graves (2008), employers shy away from admitting graduates who come from institutions that have been associated with cheating scandals in the past. This effect goes on for many years, and even the students who graduate with genuine grades are tarnished due to the scandals that the dishonest students created. This adverse effect paints institutions and their students in a bad light and thus PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH EXAM CHEATING 6 they lose market in the job industry. Expelling exam cheaters could solve this problem hence allowing graduates to compete fairly in the industry. Other than the graduates themselves, institutions of higher education are painted as lacking morals and ethics. This ethical problem is an issue that arises from the accommodation of cheating students, no matter how little the scandals may seem. According to Hayes (2017), more than 40% of employers in the manufacturing industry are employing workers who have not attended these institutions and preferred to offer on-job-training. If the reputation of higher institutions is saved through the failure to entertain cheating, graduates will be more marketable and the institutions will also be marketable to people who consider joining them. Therefore, it is evident that expelling students who are caught cheating will sanctify the reputation of institutions of higher learning and thus increase their social acceptance and that of the graduates who come from them. Other than making institutions and their graduates more socially acceptable and recognized, expelling cheating students will also present positive economic repercussions for the students and the institutions as well. Students who invest in their education often expect an economic gain from the expertise that they get from school (Fendler and Godbey, 2016). However, cheaters fail to realize that getting genuine grades means that they get the relevant knowledge and expertise required in the industry. For instance, a business management student who cheats misses the chance to obtain crucial business management skills that he or she requires running businesses well in the industry. Abolishing cheating and taking a tough stand on it as Abasi and Graves (2008) suggest makes the students realize that the only way to obtain the grades is through the proper channels. Eventually, the economic value of the money and resources that they or their parents invest in the education is realized in the skills that they get PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH EXAM CHEATING 7 through hard work. All this chain reaction and consequences can be viewed as a result of expelling students who cheat in exams tests and making a tough stand against cheating. Institutions that expel cheating students also gain economically from the tough stand against cheating. The policies in institutions of higher learning market or spoil the market for them. For instance, as a parent, one would not like to enroll their child in an institution that encourages cheating; they feel cheated and their children corrupted. Therefore, if an institution has a good track record set by the tough stand they have on cheating, it is likely to attract more applicants. Similarly, when a person is applying to an institution, they like to know that their investment will not be compromised by negative publicity. Essentially, as Fenler and Godbey (2016) discuss, institutions sell themselves to potential consumers when they implement policies that point towards promoting ethical conduct. This case of cheating is similar to any other issue that could bring negative publicity such as student or employee abuse. That way, if the policy of zero tolerance to cheating is implemented, the institution attracts more applicants which translate to an economic gain. Cheating students find a short way to achieve their life dreams of education, better job opportunity, and even a lifestyle. All this may be based on a lie that is the cheating that they do in their higher education courses. While these people base their entire lives on gaining advantages unfairly, there is another category of people that struggle to make it in life and attain their goals. This arrangement is unfair and promotes inequality in every aspect of life. Therefore, if cheaters are not allowed to have their way unfairly, the policy promotes equality in the society. Expelling cheaters promotes equality in education because every person in the institutions gets their educational certificates rightfully and they, therefore, compete equally in life. Hayes (2017) argues that people who get undeserved credits in school are more likely to be corrupt in other PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH EXAM CHEATING 8 aspects of the society. Such people are annoying, and they promote inequality. If expelling cheaters are authorized, such people will be limited in the society. Expelling cheaters is one of the sure ways of promoting equality, increasing the economic benefits of the education system, and saving the reputation of institutions. It is evident that employing graduates from institutions faced with scandals is a thing that most employers do not prefer. Therefore, saving the reputation of institutions creates a positive image in the society. Further, a cheater lies to himself that they gain any advantage through the certificate, but the critical knowledge is not gained. Expelling them will allow people to gain skills and knowledge that match their investment. Finally, equality in tests translates to equality in the society and thus expelling the perpetrators of cheating malpractices will increase equality in the society. PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH EXAM CHEATING 9 References Abasi, A. & Graves, B. (2008). Academic literacy and plagiarism: Conversations with international graduate students and disciplinary professors. Journal of English and Academic Purposes, 7(4), 221-233. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jeap.2008.10.010 Beasley, E. M. (2014). Students reported for cheating explain what they think would have stopped them. Ethics & Behavior, 24(3), 229-252. Dick, M., Sheard, J., Bareiss, C., Carter, J., Joyce, D., Harding, T., & Laxer, C. (2002, June). Addressing student cheating: definitions and solutions. In ACM SigCSE Bulletin (Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 172-184). ACM. Fendler, R. & Godbey, J. (2016). Cheaters Should Never Win: Eliminating the Benefits of Cheating. Journal of Academic Ethics, 14: 71. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10805-0159240-8 Hamlin, A., Barczyk, C., Powell, G., & Frost, J. (2013). A comparison of university efforts to contain academic dishonesty. Journal of Legal, Ethical and Regulatory Issues, 16(1), 35. Hayes, D. (2017). Beyond McDonaldization: Visions of Higher Education. New York, NY: Routledge. Kusnoor, A. V., & Falik, R. (2013). Cheating in medical school: the unacknowledged ailment. South Med J, 106(8), 479-83.
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Explanation & Answer

Attached.

Running head: PART 3: DISADVANTAGES

Part 3: Disadvantages
Name
Institution

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PART 3: DISADVANTAGES

2
Part 3: Disadvantages

Following a critical review of the advantages that institutions and students in them stand
to gain upon expelling cheaters, it is also crucial to appreciate that this move comes with tradeoffs as well. While expelling cheaters from school may be the most effective means of reducing
the malpractice, it comes with several disadvantages which must also be analyzed. The analysis
of these disadvantages portrays that there is no ‘perfect’ intervention that can stop cheating
without producing undesired effects. Expelling students may set an example for those who
remain in school, but it ruins the lives of those expelled by reducing their chances of ever
completing their degree, reducing their chances of employment, and causing adverse mental
effects such as depression.
Expelling students does not teach anything to those who have been expelled. Instead, it
punishes them and simply removes the option of a second chance for them to correct their
behavior. According to Donna (2017), students who are expelled for cheating are 50% less likely
to attain a degree even in other institutions than students who remain in school. Therefore, by
expelling students caught cheating, it is evident that their educational system is disrupted and
they are highly disadvantaged. This raises the equity question of whether sacrificing the
education and probably the career opportunity of a student is worthy the advantages that come
with expelling students. The student is highly disadvantaged for a mistake they make in school
while some who cheat and are never caught enjoy their life on campus. That way, the expulsion
offsets equity.
Second, expelling students who are caught cheating may cause depression due to stress
and lead to the adverse effects of health associated with depression. Depression in students who
are expelled from colleges may be a result of the desperation they find themselves in. When they

PART 3: DISADVANTAGES

3

are expelled, being admitted in other institutions becomes hard, getting a well-paying job equally
poses such a challenge, and attaining the lifestyle and dreams that a person has when pursuing a
higher education becomes almost impossible (Coleman, 2014). This puts a lot of pressure on the
student, and thus they may sink into depression which threatens their health. This presents a
moral disadvantage whereby the health and well-being of the student are compromised for the
sake of the image of the institutions.

Siniver, E. (2013). Cheating on exams: the case of Israeli students." College Student Journal,
47(4), 593. (Academic OneFile)
The expulsion solution presents several disadvantages to the expelled students by
reducing their chances of completing their degree and getting a well-paying job. Further, it
increases the likelihood of developing depression from stress due to the life pressure mounted on
them. However, these consequences are present for those who disregard policies and provide a
good example for those in school when viewed from a utilitarian point of view. Therefore,
expelling cheating students is effective in controlling the malpractice.

PART 3: DISADVANTAGES

4
References

Coleman, N. (2014). Promoting resilience through adversity: increasing positive outcomes for
expelled students. Educational Studies, 41(1), 171-187.
https://doi.org/10.1080/03055698.2014.955741
Donna, V. (2017). Handbook of Research on Academic Misconduct in Higher Education.
Hershey, PA: IGI Global.


Running head: PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH EXAM CHEATING

Problems Associated with Exam Cheating
Fanessa M. Sellers
Professor Rachel Gruskin
ENG 215 Research and Writing
November 23, 2017

1

PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH EXAM CHEATING

2

Problems Associated with Exam Cheating
More than 60% of college students have cheated in college examinations at one point in
their lives. More than 20% do not regret it and thus become regular cheaters attaining GPAs that
are not rightfully theirs (Beasly, 2014). This trend is very worrying because the industries get
more than 20% of cheaters and a workforce that does not rightfully qualify to be where it is.
Therefore, the problem of cheating in colleges is a big one, and it deserves serious actions. The
most severe punishment that a student can get for cheating is discontinuation from the program
that he or she is unde...


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