Dialectical Journal

Anonymous
timer Asked: Dec 23rd, 2017
account_balance_wallet $40

Question description

dialectical journal

everything is explained clearly in the attachments

please read carefully what it requires and let me know if you have any concerns


Dialectical Journals A dialectic is a mode of inquiry and reasoning that relies upon dialogue, or a ‘conversation’ between opposing parts, to make discoveries and arrive at conclusions. Your dialectical journal will be an opportunity for you to open up a conversation with the text, to consider its points, its features, its patterns, and to respond to them in your own way in order to better understand what it is you’re reading. I hope that you will find that writing these journals helps you read more deeply, more incisively, and more productively, and that they will help you feel better acquainted with the texts we read and more prepared to discuss them in class. I also hope that they will serve you as a jumping-off point for your papers, and a source of observations and pieces of textual evidence that you can use to advance your arguments. Procedure: • As you read, choose passages that stand out to you and write them in the left column in quotes with the page number(s) in parentheses. How to choose passages: Look for quotes that seem significant, powerful, thought provoking, or even puzzling. For example, you might record: o passages that remind you of your own life or something you've seen before o structural shifts or turns in the argument or plot o a passage that makes you realize something you hadn't encountered before o effective and/or creative use of stylistic or literary devices o examples of patterns: recurring images, ideas, colors, symbols or motifs. o passages with confusing language or unfamiliar vocabulary o events or elements you find surprising or confusing o passages that illustrate a particular character, setting, or opinion • In the right column, write a response to the passage you’ve just written down. There are endless ways to engage with a text: you can pull out ideas/insights, ask questions, offer reflections on the passage, draw a connection, or comment on the rhetorical or stylistic moves the author is making. These categories can often blur into each other, but here are some good starting points for your journal entries: o question - ask about something in the passage that is unclear or you believe to be incorrect o connect - make a connection to another part of the text, another text, or your own life o reflect - think deeply about what the passage means in a broad sense, not just within the piece. What larger conclusions can you draw about the topic, human nature o evaluate - make a judgment about the character(s), their actions, what the author is trying to say, or how the author is saying it Sample sentence starters: Here the author seems to imply that… I wonder why… I don't understand this because... I dislike/like this idea because... I think the author is trying to illustrate/argue that… This part doesn't make sense because... This passage reminds me of (other part of text, part of another text we’ve read, personal memory, etc.) because... “Quote” (#). Responses “When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the elbow . . . (3). I remember breaking my foot before a choir concert. I was not feeling well and had to leave the risers before a concert. When I was hopping down from the third riser, I landed on the side of my foot and broke it. All I cared about when I was recovering was being able to walk without crutches or a walking cast again. This seems to be how Jem kind of feels. (Making a Connection) “There was no hurry, for there was nowhere to go . . . nothing to see outside the boundaries of Maycomb County. But it was a time of vague optimism for some of the people: Maycomb County had recently been told that it had nothing to fear but fear itself” (7, 8). Apparently Maycomb is also a very slow, sleepy town that is pretty isolated from everything else. This seems to be especially true since they only have a “vague” notion of FDR’s speech (an allusion to the Great Depression of the 1930s – must be the era in which the story takes place) and there is “nothing” outside of Maycomb County. I wonder why they see the world this way – maybe people don’t travel because of the Depression or because that’s just not what people did. (Interpreting/Asking a Question) “The Radleys, welcome anywhere in town, kept to themselves, a predilection unforgivable in Maycomb. . . .” (9). It seems that the town is a little closed minded in viewing the Radleys since they don’t go to church or do other things common in Maycomb. This seems to be a prejudice against their lifestyle since it seems that the town might not really know them and has become pretty superstitious about them. People often get suspicious about what they don’t understand or what seems strange to them. (Extending the Meaning) “One night, in an excessive spurt of high spirits, the boys backed around the town square in a borrowed flivver . . .” (10). This doesn’t sound like a six year old, so it might not be as realistic. However, this is written as a flashback, so Scout must be MUCH older now as she is telling this. Maybe she is just really smart. (Challenging the Text) Sample Dialectical Journal for To Kill a Mockingbird
Dialectical Journals A dialectic is a mode of inquiry and reasoning that relies upon dialogue, or a ‘conversation’ between opposing parts, to make discoveries and arrive at conclusions. Your dialectical journal will be an opportunity for you to open up a conversation with the text, to consider its points, its features, its patterns, and to respond to them in your own way in order to better understand what it is you’re reading. I hope that you will find that writing these journals helps you read more deeply, more incisively, and more productively, and that they will help you feel better acquainted with the texts we read and more prepared to discuss them in class. I also hope that they will serve you as a jumping-off point for your papers, and a source of observations and pieces of textual evidence that you can use to advance your arguments. Procedure: • As you read, choose passages that stand out to you and write them in the left column in quotes with the page number(s) in parentheses. How to choose passages: Look for quotes that seem significant, powerful, thought provoking, or even puzzling. For example, you might record: o passages that remind you of your own life or something you've seen before o structural shifts or turns in the argument or plot o a passage that makes you realize something you hadn't encountered before o effective and/or creative use of stylistic or literary devices o examples of patterns: recurring images, ideas, colors, symbols or motifs. o passages with confusing language or unfamiliar vocabulary o events or elements you find surprising or confusing o passages that illustrate a particular character, setting, or opinion • In the right column, write a response to the passage you’ve just written down. There are endless ways to engage with a text: you can pull out ideas/insights, ask questions, offer reflections on the passage, draw a connection, or comment on the rhetorical or stylistic moves the author is making. These categories can often blur into each other, but here are some good starting points for your journal entries: o question - ask about something in the passage that is unclear or you believe to be incorrect o connect - make a connection to another part of the text, another text, or your own life o reflect - think deeply about what the passage means in a broad sense, not just within the piece. What larger conclusions can you draw about the topic, human nature o evaluate - make a judgment about the character(s), their actions, what the author is trying to say, or how the author is saying it Sample sentence starters: Here the author seems to imply that… I wonder why… I don't understand this because... I dislike/like this idea because... I think the author is trying to illustrate/argue that… This part doesn't make sense because... This passage reminds me of (other part of text, part of another text we’ve read, personal memory, etc.) because... “Quote” (#). Responses “When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the elbow . . . (3). I remember breaking my foot before a choir concert. I was not feeling well and had to leave the risers before a concert. When I was hopping down from the third riser, I landed on the side of my foot and broke it. All I cared about when I was recovering was being able to walk without crutches or a walking cast again. This seems to be how Jem kind of feels. (Making a Connection) “There was no hurry, for there was nowhere to go . . . nothing to see outside the boundaries of Maycomb County. But it was a time of vague optimism for some of the people: Maycomb County had recently been told that it had nothing to fear but fear itself” (7, 8). Apparently Maycomb is also a very slow, sleepy town that is pretty isolated from everything else. This seems to be especially true since they only have a “vague” notion of FDR’s speech (an allusion to the Great Depression of the 1930s – must be the era in which the story takes place) and there is “nothing” outside of Maycomb County. I wonder why they see the world this way – maybe people don’t travel because of the Depression or because that’s just not what people did. (Interpreting/Asking a Question) “The Radleys, welcome anywhere in town, kept to themselves, a predilection unforgivable in Maycomb. . . .” (9). It seems that the town is a little closed minded in viewing the Radleys since they don’t go to church or do other things common in Maycomb. This seems to be a prejudice against their lifestyle since it seems that the town might not really know them and has become pretty superstitious about them. People often get suspicious about what they don’t understand or what seems strange to them. (Extending the Meaning) “One night, in an excessive spurt of high spirits, the boys backed around the town square in a borrowed flivver . . .” (10). This doesn’t sound like a six year old, so it might not be as realistic. However, this is written as a flashback, so Scout must be MUCH older now as she is telling this. Maybe she is just really smart. (Challenging the Text) Sample Dialectical Journal for To Kill a Mockingbird

Tutor Answer

dannychavs
School: UC Berkeley

flag Report DMCA
Review

Anonymous
Thanks, good work

Similar Questions
Hot Questions
Related Tags

Brown University





1271 Tutors

California Institute of Technology




2131 Tutors

Carnegie Mellon University




982 Tutors

Columbia University





1256 Tutors

Dartmouth University





2113 Tutors

Emory University





2279 Tutors

Harvard University





599 Tutors

Massachusetts Institute of Technology



2319 Tutors

New York University





1645 Tutors

Notre Dam University





1911 Tutors

Oklahoma University





2122 Tutors

Pennsylvania State University





932 Tutors

Princeton University





1211 Tutors

Stanford University





983 Tutors

University of California





1282 Tutors

Oxford University





123 Tutors

Yale University





2325 Tutors