Discussion on Modern and Postmodern Poetry

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Question: Discussion on Modern and Postmodern Poetry

Henry James and "Daisy Miller"In the following post, discuss two poems POSTED IN THE CLASS. In a short, 500 word essay, discuss how one of the poems you have chosen is an example of modern literature and the other poem you have chosen is an example of postmodern poetry. Use the lists of ideas from the module on modernism and postmodernism to help guide you through what are the elements of modernism vs postmodernism. Use quotes to identify the quality of modernism or postmodernism you wish to discuss. Then use quotes from the poems you have chosen to discuss how they are examples of modernism or postmodernism. Think carefully about this. Once you have posted, be sure to respond to at least two other students with thoughtful and carefully considered analyses of their ideas.

INSTRUCTIONS I have attached All things that Dr. Williams has provided for me. And the question is right below this paragraph. It’s a class discussion. If you message me on studypool and I do not respond, My email is Charelious@gmail.com if you have any questions. Do not hesitate to contact me because they come right to my phone. Question: Discussion on Modern and Postmodern Poetry Henry James and "Daisy Miller"In the following post, discuss two poems POSTED IN THE CLASS. In a short, 500 word essay, discuss how one of the poems you have chosen is an example of modern literature and the other poem you have chosen is an example of postmodern poetry. Use the lists of ideas from the module on modernism and postmodernism to help guide you through what are the elements of modernism vs postmodernism. Use quotes to identify the quality of modernism or postmodernism you wish to discuss. Then use quotes from the poems you have chosen to discuss how they are examples of modernism or postmodernism. Think carefully about this. Once you have posted, be sure to respond to at least two other students with thoughtful and carefully considered analyses of their ideas. Textbook: The Norton Anthology of American Lit. 7th, 8th or 9th edition Books C, D and E. Students can use the 7th, 8th or 9th edition. Langston Hughes Read the introduction for Langston Hughes in the textbook Vol. D. There is NO copy posted in the class. Students will have to use the textbook for the readings from this day forward. Read the following poems: “I, Too,” and “The Weary Blues.” Keep in mind the difference between objectivity and subjectivity: Subjectivity does not focus on "the outer, external and social reality and class conflict, [rather it focuses] . . . on the inner life, psychology, mind and subjective experience of characters." It is found in first person accounts. Read the excerpt of Hughes’s essay from “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain." Watch videos and read the explanations listed in the next section. There will be a quiz on all the poetry and an extra-credit discussion on the poetry. Videos and Essays on Langston Hughes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4CUKyVrhPgM I, Too https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KyqwvC5s4n8 Poetry- The Weary Blues Explanation of ‘I Too’ and The Weary Blues “The Weary Blues” and “I Too” Reading Guide “The Weary Blues” and “I Too” Reading Guide Before you begin reading, consider the following ideas. Use these ideas to organize your thoughts as you read. Poet’s Life & Ideas Langston Hughes was born at the beginning of the 20th century in 1902 and is one of the most important writers from the Harlem Renaissance, a movement that happened in Harlem after the great migration north of many African Americans who went to the city looking for work and freedoms not offered in the south. Hughes traveled extensively over his lifetime, going to Paris and the Soviet Union among other places. He also published extensively. He wrote everything from journalism to children’s books. He was politically active early in his career and wrote extensively about the African American experience. Throughout his writing career he worked to capture the speech and the oral art forms of black culture in his poetry and his prose. Poet’s Methods “The Weary Blues” is a poem about a street singer. It eradicates any line between “high” and “low” art forms and argues that the blues (or what was then popular music) as an art form is just as worthy of our attention as opera, for example. The poem captures the rhythmic quality of the blues as it describes a street singer “Down on Lenox Avenue” (a street in Harlem). Not only does the poem capture the rhythmic patterns but it also uses some of the language from the song and suggests some of the speech patterns of the singer are worthy of art– “I ain’t happy no mo’” says the singer in his song. Just as Frost attempted to honor the ordinary speech of New England farmers and show its poetic quality, Hughes wanted to honor the vernacular of African Americans and show the poetic quality of the life he heard on the streets of Harlem. In his essay From “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain,” published in 1926, Hughes discusses his ideas about black American identity and how that affects Africa-American artists. In this essay Hughes posits a beautifully articulated argument for his own poetry. “I Too” is a sort of rage against the machine of codified racism that permeated American culture during much of Hughes’s life. The ideas in the poem might not seem so extraordinary to poetry students of this millennium; however, during Hughes’s time, the ideas taking shaping in this poem and in other poems like this one that Hughes wrote, were considered quite iconoclastic. As a poet and an artist Hughes hoped to destroy the old images of African Americans and he wanted to break the yoke of the horrors of Jim Crow laws that kept Black men and women from voting, being able to travel freely, and from being able to express themselves without fear of white retribution in almost every walk of life. He also sought to speak quite frankly to and for other African Americans. In the poem he takes up a strategy used by a previous American poet Walt Whitman, who wrote Leaves of Grass just decades before Hughes wrote his poem. In Whitman’s poem the refrain “I too” is repeated many times. One of the most famous refrains is in this couplet: “I too am not a bit tamed—I too am untranslatable; / I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world.” Here Whitman is discussing both his own private identity and the American identity as a new culture in an old world. Hughes’ poem is an answer to Whitman’s. And in Hughes’ poem he demands that the African American experience be included in the American experience. He wanted give voice to what he saw as a collective sorrow and he wanted to change the world through his poetry. In many ways, Hughes was as successful in this goal as any poet could hope to be. His poetry was widely read by both Black and White readers during his own time and it still remains some of the most widely read poetry by any American writer who ever put pen to paper. "The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain" http://www.english.illinois.edu/Maps/poets/g_l/hughes/mountain.htm Robert Frost Read the introduction to Robert Frost in Vol. D of the textbook. Use the index in the back of the book to help you find the pages for your edition. Read "Home Burial," and "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," and "The Road Not Taken." Watch the videos posted on Frost and his poetry. Videos and Essays on Robert Frost https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CCz9p_Gqn9I Home Burial by Robert Frost (Audiobook) | POETRY | #robertfrost https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfOxdZfo0gs Stopping by woods on a snowy evening https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=snQvRZ2vDHE The Road Less Traveled By Postmodern Poetry Read the introduction to all of the following poets in Vol. E of the edition of the textbook you have: Billy Collins, Li-Young Lee, and Gloria Anzaldua. Also read the following poems from each poet: Billy Collins (read "Forgetfulness" and "Tuesday, June 4, 1991") Li-Young Lee (read "The Gift" and "Persimmons") Gloria Anzaldua (read "How to Tame a Wild Tongue") Complete the extra-credit posting Take the quiz on ALL the poetry (worth 10% of your grade)

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Tutor.Leal
School: Duke University

Attached.

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INTRODUCTION

BODY

CONCLUSION

REFERENCE


LAST NAME 1
Classification of Two Poems
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Date:
‘I, TOO’ AND ‘THE WEARY BLUES’
The concept of modernity and postmodernity is vastly employed in literature and other
facets of life. The contrast between these two, however, is very minimal because modernity is the
pre-case of postmodernity. An implication of how it borrows from the previous type.
Modernism considers rationality and logical thinking while postmodernism scores low
coherently; however, it struggles to eliminate the variance between high and low. The
modernism literature further presents itself as an original work that is primary and never borrows
from ...

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