Answer multiple choice and essay questions on the crucible and literature

Anonymous
timer Asked: Jan 13th, 2018
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Question Description

  1. Match each literary term with its correct definition.
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    Answer
    A.the author's attitude toward the subject he/she is writing about
    B.the author's relationship to the audience and subject in a piece of writing
    C.the people the author intended to reach through a piece of literature
    D.the overall observation or message about life conveyed by an author through a piece of literature
    E.what the author is saying about his/her subject in a piece of non-fiction

10 points

QUESTION 2

  1. "O sinner! Consider the fearful danger you are in: it is a great furnace of wrath, a wide and bottomless pit, full of fire of wrath, voked and incensed a much against you, as against many of the damned in hell. You hang by a slender thread, with the flames of divine wrath flashing about it and ready every moment to singe it and burn it asunder, and you have...nothing to keep off the flames of wrath, nothing of your own, nothing that you have ever done, nothing that you can do to induce God to spare you one moment." (Jonathan Edwards, Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God)
    The tone of this passage can best be described as

3 points

QUESTION 3

  1. "Besides, what could they see but a hideous and desolate wilderness, full of wild beasts and wild men--and what multitude there might be of them they knew not...they could have little solace or content in respect of any outward objects." (William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation: Book1, Chapter IX)
    The perspective of the preceding passage is

    first person
    second person

    third person

3 points

QUESTION 4

  1. Besides, what could they see but a hideous and desolate wilderness, full of wild beasts and wild men--and what multitude there might be of them they knew not...they could have little solace or content in respect of any outward objects." (William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation: Book1, Chapter IX)
    The audience of the preceding passage is

3 points

QUESTION 5

  1. One of the key questions for analyzing purpose is: Why is the author writing about the subject?

2 points

QUESTION 6

  1. One of the key questions for analyzing perspective is: What voice or case are the pronouns used in the passage?

2 points

QUESTION 7

  1. The best graphic organizer to use to better understand a definition passage is

3 points

QUESTION 8

  1. The best graphic organizer to use to better understand a narrative is

3 points

QUESTION 9

  1. One of the key questions historical criticism attempts to answer is: What were the common beliefs that people of the time embraced?

2 points

QUESTION 10

  1. One of the key questions historical criticism attempts to answer is: When did the period in question begin and end?

2 points

QUESTION 11

  1. One of the key questions historical criticism attempts to answer is: What were the important conflicts of the time?

2 points

QUESTION 12

  1. Writers during the colonial period can be divided into which two main groups

3 points

QUESTION 13

  1. Writers in the Enlightenment were reacting against

3 points

QUESTION 14

  1. Match each term associated with the language component of historical criticism with an example of its use.
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    Answer
    A.Colonial text: "fall upon" versus the modern text: "go after" (both mean to attack)
    B.Puritan text: "the Lord preserved me in safety" versus the modern text: "The Lord protected me
    C.Explorer text: "Very often indeed they would first give us a song" versus the modern text: "First they would often sing to us.

6 points

QUESTION 15

  1. Match each element of drama with its definition and example:
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    Answer
    A.the message of the play
    B.any sound that adds to the dramatic affect, such as instruments, rhythms, or rhyming
    C.the events of the play that happen both on and off stage
    D.the actor's interpretive creation based on the text
    E.any visual effect such as setting, costumes, or dancing
    F.the words that create the story such as dialogue, monologue, or soliloquy

12 points

QUESTION 16

  1. How does Proctor feel about Abigail?

3 points

QUESTION 17

  1. What advice does the doctor give Rev. Parris?

3 points

QUESTION 18

  1. What does John ask Mary Warren to do?

3 points

QUESTION 19

  1. Why do Ezekial Cheever and Marshal Herrick arrive at the Proctor home?

3 points

QUESTION 20

  1. What does Hale do when Proctor is arrested?

3 points

QUESTION 21

  1. What does John Proctor mean when he says, "God is dead!"?

3 points

QUESTION 22

  1. After John confesses, what does Danforth want him to do?
    change his name and leave Salem
    marry Abigail so it can all be over
    convince the others to confess
    sign the written confession

3 points

QUESTION 23

  1. How has Elizabeth changed since Act 1?

3 points

QUESTION 24

  1. Which of the following are characteristics of allegory?
    imitation
    humor

    didacticism

    spiral plot

    music

2 points

QUESTION 25

  1. In a short essay analyze the most important theme of The Crucible. Use evidence from Aristotle's other 5 elements of drama to support your idea. Use at least 3 direct quotes from the play that demonstrate the theme.
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5 points

QUESTION 26

  1. In a short essay, discuss how the play The Crucible reflects the time in which it was written (the 1950's). Be sure to mention political, religious, social, and artistic events that shaped the work.
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5 points

QUESTION 27

  1. In a short essay compare and contrast the passages below. Compare and contrast the themes, writing styles, and values expressed in the passages.

    Passage A: "To My Dear and Loving Husband" by Anne Bradstreet
    If ever two were one, then surely we.
    If ever man were lov'd by wife, then thee.
    If ever wife was happy in a man,
    Compare with me, ye women, if you can.
    I prize thy love more than whole Mines of gold
    Or all the riches that the East doth hold.
    My love is such that Rivers cannot quench,
    Nor ought but love from thee give recompense.
    Thy love is such I can no way repay.
    The heavens reward thee manifold, I pray.
    Then while we live, in love let's so persevere
    That when we live no more, we may live ever.

    Passage B: excerpt from "A Very Short Story" by Ernest Hemingway
    "One hot evening in Padua they carried him up onto the roof and he could look out over the top of the town. There were chimney swifts in the sky. After a while it got dark and the searchlights came out. The others went down and took the bottles with them. He and Luz could hear them below on the balcony. Luz sat on the bed.She was cool and fresh in the hot night.Luz stayed on night duty for three months. They were glad to let her. When they operated on him she prepared him for the operating table; and they had a joke about friend or enema. He went under the anesthetic holding tight on to himself so he would not blab about anything during the silly, talky time. After he got on crutches he used to take the temperatures so Luz would not have to get up from the bed.There were only a few patients, and they all knew about it. They all liked Luz. As he walked back along the halls he thought of Luz in his bed.Before he went back to the front they went into the Duomo and prayed.It was dim and quiet, and there were other people praying. They wanted to get married, but there was not enough time for the banns, and neither of them had birth certificates. They felt as though they were married, but they wanted everyone to know about it, and to make it so they could not lose it.Luz wrote him many letters that he never got until after the armistice. Fifteen came in a bunch to the front and he sorted them by the dates and read them all straight through. They were all about the hospital, and how much she loved him and how it was impossible to get along without him and how terrible it was missing him at night.After the armistice they agreed he should go home to get a job so they might be married.Luz would not come home until he had a good job and could come to New York to meet her. It was understood he would not drink, and he did not want to see his friends or anyone in the States. Only to get a job and be married.On the train from Padua to Milan they quarreled about her not being willing to come home at once. When they had to say good-bye, in the station at Milan, they kissed good-bye, but were not finished with the quarrel. He felt sick about saying good-bye like that.He went to America on a boat from Genoa. Luz went back to Pordonone to open a hospital. It was lonely and rainy there, and there was a battalion of arditi quartered in the town. Living in the muddy, rainy town in the winter, the major of the battalion made love to Luz, and she had never known Italians before, and finally wrote to the States that theirs had only been a boy and girl affair. She was sorry, and she knew he would probably not be able to understand, but might some day forgive her, and be grateful to her, and she expected, absolutely unexpectedly, to be married in the spring. She loved him as always, but she realized now it was only a boy and girl love. She hoped he would have a great career, and believed in him absolutely. She knew it was for the best.The major did not marry her in the spring, or any other time. Luz never got an answer to the letter to Chicago about it."

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    Tutor Answer

    Prof_Demidko
    School: Duke University

    Attached.

    Question 1
    Match the Literary term with its correct definition
    Q: The author's attitude toward the subject he/she is writing about.
    A: Theme
    Q: The author's relationship to the audience and subject in a piece of writing
    A: Tone
    Q: The people the author intended to reach through a piece of literature.
    A: Audience
    Q: The overall observation or message about life conveyed by an author through a piece of
    literature
    A: Main Idea
    Q: What the author is saying about his/her subject in a piece of non-fiction.
    A: Point of view
    Question 2
    Q: The tone of this passage can be described as
    A: Angry
    Question 3
    Q: The perspective of the preceding passage is
    A: third person
    Question 4
    Q: The audience of the preceding passage is
    A: General
    Question 5
    Q: One of the key questions for analyzing purpose is: Why is the author writing about the
    subject?
    A: True - the authorial intention is an important factor in analyzing text.
    Question 6
    Q: One of the key questions for analyzing perspective is: What voice or case are the pronouns
    used in the passage?

    A: True - without the voice you can’t tell the perspective of what the author is trying to
    show.

    Question 7
    Q: The best graphic organizer to use to better understand a definition passage is
    A: The best graphic organizer to use to better understand a definition passage is a Venn
    diagram.
    Question 8
    Q: The best graphic organizer to use to better understand a narrative is
    A: Venn diagram
    Question 9
    Q: One of the key questions historical criticism attempts to answer is: What were the common
    beliefs that people of the time embraced?
    A: False, one of the key questions, the historical criticism tries to provide the solution is to
    let everyone know the world that is behind the text. By this, they would be able to look at
    the text history and also be able to interpret its literature. To fully have the understanding,
    the historical criticism would first ha...

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    Review

    Anonymous
    Excellent job

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