SCI 207-Week 2 - Assignment

Anonymous

Question Description

Evaluating Credible and Scholarly Scientific Sources The purpose of this assignment is to help you distinguish between different types of information sources and evaluate sources of information for credibility.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

SCI 207-Week 2 - Assignment Evaluating Credible and Scholarly Scientific Sources The purpose of this assignment is to help you distinguish between different types of information sources and evaluate sources of information for credibility. Scientists and scholars use information from a variety of sources, some of them scholarly journal articles that have been peer-reviewed (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site., and others credible websites, magazines, and news sources. While all scholarly sources are considered credible, most credible sources you will encounter in your daily life are not actually scholarly. It is important to view information with a critical eye, as there is a lot of misinformation from bunk sources out there. If you do not believe this, just navigate to Google in your Internet browser, type in the words, “We never went to the Moon”, and see what you find. Did you know that the Moon may be made of cheese? Exactly what kind, however, remains a mystery (Uncyclopedia.wikia.com, 2016). In order to complete this assignment, you will need to follow the links provided on the Week Two Assignment Reporting Form to view three numbered sources. For each source, complete a two-page questionnaire. When you have finished, you will have identified which of three sources is not credible, which sources are credible, and which source is also scholarly. Once you have completed the required sections within the Week Two Assignment Reporting Form submit the document via Waypoint. The document does not need to include a title page or other APA formatting; however, if you utilize any outside sources in your answers, you must reference these sources in proper APA format as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center. Uncyclopedia.wikia.com (2016). Is the Moon made of cheese? Retrieved from http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Is_the_moon_made_of_cheese%3F (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Evaluating Credible and Scholarly Scientific Sources Week Two Assignment In this assignment, you will examine three different sources - one source that would be considered scholarly, one source that is credible but not scholarly, and one source that would not be considered credible for use in an academic paper. After completing a worksheet on each source, can you identify which is which? Instructions When looking up various scientific topics, including the example topic this week on technology and food production in the U.S., you will find all kinds of information out there. Not all of it is reliable. In order to determine if a source provides credible information, you will need to take the time to evaluate that source first before you can trust its content. Who is the intended audience of the source? Who is the author or publisher and what is their purpose for publishing the resource? These are examples of the questions you will want to ask yourself when evaluating a source. Examine these three sources and fill out the following worksheet for each one. You will be determining what type of source it is (scholarly, credible non-scholarly, and non-credible), its level of credibility, and its possible value or use within the scientific conversation about technology and agriculture in the U.S. To help you determine the credibility of a source, refer this quick video tutorial on Evaluating Sources for Credibility. Additionally, consult the strategies outlined in the CRAAP TEST. Keep in mind that you are evaluating the sources themselves and not the content within the source, or whether you agree with the positions or statements that are expressed within the source. Please write your answers in complete sentences. Source Links Source #1: http://www.saynotogmos.org/ Source #2: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0064879 Source #3: https://www.loc.gov/law/help/restrictions-on-gmos/usa.php Source #1 1. What best describes the information within this source (choose all that apply): Formal report of a study or academic analysis of an issue Fact sheet / data / statistics News Government or organizational website Opinion piece: expert? Journalist? amateur? Anecdote / personal experience Propaganda What led you to choose this answer? Provide evidence or examples from the text. 2. Currency: For this topic, is the information… Up to date Outdated Not sure (explain): 3. The purpose of the information is to: Inform Persuade Entertain Sell Other: What led you to choose this answer? Provide evidence or examples from the text. 4. Does the author provide reliable evidence to back up his or her assertions? How do you know? (Tip: Look for references within the text or presented as a list. Ask yourself if the references are formally formatted and if they add weight and credibility to the discussion.) 5. Who published this source? The author himself/herself A magazine A government entity 6. An academic journal A professional organization Other(explain): The point of view of this source seems to be Objective and impartial Biased How did you make this determination? Provide a specific example from the source. 7. Authority: What is/are the author(s)’s credentials? Does he or she have college degrees? Experience related to the topic? A job in the field? Previously published work in this area? 8. Based on the information above, do you feel the target audience for this source is or could be an academic one? Why or why not? 9. Based solely on the information you have learned about this source, and not its content, do you think this is a credible source? Explain why or why not. 10. In my opinion this source is… Scholarly Non-scholarly and credible Non-scholarly and not credible Source #2 1. What best describes the information within this source (choose all that apply): Formal report of a study or academic analysis of an issue Fact sheet / data / statistics News Government or organizational website Opinion piece: expert? Journalist? amateur? Anecdote / personal experience Propaganda What led you to choose this answer? Provide evidence or examples from the text. 2. Currency: For this topic, is the information… Up to date Outdated Not sure (explain): 3. The purpose of the information is to: Inform Persuade Entertain Sell Other: What led you to choose this answer? Provide evidence or examples from the text. 4. Does the author provide reliable evidence to back up his or her assertions? How do you know? Tip: Look for references within the text or presented as a list. Ask yourself if the references are formally formatted and if they add weight and credibility to the discussion.) 5. Who published this source? The author himself/herself A magazine A government entity 6. An academic journal A professional organization Other(explain): The point of view of this source seems to be Objective and impartial Biased How did you make this determination? Provide a specific example from the source. 7. Authority: What is/are the author(s)’s credentials? Does he or she have college degrees? Experience related to the topic? A job in the field? Previously published work in this area? 8. Based on the information above, do you feel the target audience for this source is or could be an academic one? Why or why not? 9. Based solely on the information you have learned about this source, and not its content, do you think this is a credible source? Explain why or why not. 10. In my opinion this source is… Scholarly Non-scholarly and credible Non-scholarly and not credible Source #3 1. What best describes the information within this source (choose all that apply): Formal report of a study or academic analysis of an issue Fact sheet / data / statistics News Government or organizational website Opinion piece: expert? Journalist? amateur? Anecdote / personal experience Propaganda What led you to choose this answer? Provide evidence or examples from the text. 2. Currency: For this topic, is the information… Up to date Outdated Not sure (explain): 3. The purpose of the information is to: Inform Persuade Entertain Sell Other: What led you to choose this answer? Provide evidence or examples from the text. 4. Does the author provide reliable evidence to back up his or her assertions? How do you know? ( Tip: Look for references within the text or presented as a list. Ask yourself if the references are formally formatted and if they add weight and credibility to the discussion.) 5. Who published this source? The author himself/herself A magazine A government entity 6. An academic journal A professional organization Other(explain): The point of view of this source seems to be Objective and impartial Biased How did you make this determination? Provide a specific example from the source. 7. Authority: What is/are the author(s)’s credentials? Does he or she have college degrees? Experience related to the topic? A job in the field? Previously published work in this area? 8. Based on the information above, do you feel the target audience for this source is or could be an academic one? Why or why not? 9. Based solely on the information you have learned about this source, and not its content, do you think this is a credible source? Explain why or why not. 10. In my opinion this source is… Scholarly Non-scholarly and credible Non-scholarly and not credible Evaluating Credible and Scholarly Scientific Sources Week Two Assignment In this assignment, you will examine three different sources - one source that would be considered scholarly, one source that is credible but not scholarly, and one source that would not be considered credible for use in an academic paper. After completing a worksheet on each source, can you identify which is which? Instructions When looking up various scientific topics, including the example topic this week on technology and food production in the U.S., you will find all kinds of information out there. Not all of it is reliable. In order to determine if a source provides credible information, you will need to take the time to evaluate that source first before you can trust its content. Who is the intended audience of the source? Who is the author or publisher and what is their purpose for publishing the resource? These are examples of the questions you will want to ask yourself when evaluating a source. Examine these three sources and fill out the following worksheet for each one. You will be determining what type of source it is (scholarly, credible non-scholarly, and non-credible), its level of credibility, and its possible value or use within the scientific conversation about technology and agriculture in the U.S. To help you determine the credibility of a source, refer this quick video tutorial on Evaluating Sources for Credibility. Additionally, consult the strategies outlined in the CRAAP TEST. Keep in mind that you are evaluating the sources themselves and not the content within the source, or whether you agree with the positions or statements that are expressed within the source. Please write your answers in complete sentences. Source Links Source #1: http://www.saynotogmos.org/ Source #2: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0064879 Source #3: https://www.loc.gov/law/help/restrictions-on-gmos/usa.php Source #1 1. What best describes the information within this source (choose all that apply): Formal report of a study or academic analysis of an issue Fact sheet / data / statistics News Government or organizational website Opinion piece: expert? Journalist? amateur? Anecdote / personal experience Propaganda What led you to choose this answer? Provide evidence or examples from the text. 2. Currency: For this topic, is the information… Up to date Outdated Not sure (explain): 3. The purpose of the information is to: Inform Persuade Entertain Sell Other: What led you to choose this answer? Provide evidence or examples from the text. 4. Does the author provide reliable evidence to back up his or her assertions? How do you know? (Tip: Look for references within the text or presented as a list. Ask yourself if the references are formally formatted and if they add weight and credibility to the discussion.) 5. Who published this source? The author himself/herself A magazine A government entity 6. An academic journal A professional organization Other(explain): The point of view of this source seems to be Objective and impartial Biased How did you make this determination? Provide a specific example from the source. 7. Authority: What is/are the author(s)’s credentials? Does he or she have college degrees? Experience related to the topic? A job in the field? Previously published work in this area? 8. Based on the information above, do you feel the target audience for this source is or could be an academic one? Why or why not? 9. Based solely on the information you have learned about this source, and not its content, do you think this is a credible source? Explain why or why not. 10. In my opinion this source is… Scholarly Non-scholarly and credible Non-scholarly and not credible Source #2 1. What best describes the information within this source (choose all that apply): Formal report of a study or academic analysis of an issue Fact sheet / data / statistics News Government or organizational website Opinion piece: expert? Journalist? amateur? Anecdote / personal experience Propaganda What led you to choose this answer? Provide evidence or examples from the text. 2. Currency: For this topic, is the information… Up to date Outdated Not sure (explain): 3. The purpose of the information is to: Inform Persuade Entertain Sell Other: What led you to choose this answer? Provide evidence or examples from the text. 4. Does the author provide reliable evidence to back up his or her assertions? How do you know? Tip: Look for references within the text or presented as a list. Ask yourself if the references are formally formatted and if they add weight and credibility to the discussion.) 5. Who published this source? The author himself/herself A magazine A government entity 6. An academic journal A professional organization Other(explain): The point of view of this source seems to be Objective and impartial Biased How did you make this determination? Provide a specific example from the source. 7. Authority: What is/are the author(s)’s credentials? Does he or she have college degrees? Experience related to the topic? A job in the field? Previously published work in this area? 8. Based on the information above, do you feel the target audience for this source is or could be an academic one? Why or why not? 9. Based solely on the information you have learned about this source, and not its content, do you think this is a credible source? Explain why or why not. 10. In my opinion this source is… Scholarly Non-scholarly and credible Non-scholarly and not credible Source #3 1. What best describes the information within this source (choose all that apply): Formal report of a study or academic analysis of an issue Fact sheet / data / statistics News Government or organizational website Opinion piece: expert? Journalist? amateur? Anecdote / personal experience Propaganda What led you to choose this answer? Provide evidence or examples from the text. 2. Currency: For this topic, is the information… Up to date Outdated Not sure (explain): 3. The purpose of the information is to: Inform Persuade Entertain Sell Other: What led you to choose this answer? Provide evidence or examples from the text. 4. Does the author provide reliable evidence to back up his or her assertions? How do you know? ( Tip: Look for references within the text or presented as a list. Ask yourself if the references are formally formatted and if they add weight and credibility to the discussion.) 5. Who published this source? The author himself/herself A magazine A government entity 6. An academic journal A professional organization Other(explain): The point of view of this source seems to be Objective and impartial Biased How did you make this determination? Provide a specific example from the source. 7. Authority: What is/are the author(s)’s credentials? Does he or she have college degrees? Experience related to the topic? A job in the field? Previously published work in this area? 8. Based on the information above, do you feel the target audience for this source is or could be an academic one? Why or why not? 9. Based solely on the information you have learned about this source, and not its content, do you think this is a credible source? Explain why or why not. 10. In my opinion this source is… Scholarly Non-scholarly and credible Non-scholarly and not credible ...
Purchase answer to see full attachment

Tutor Answer

chemtai
School: Purdue University

please find the attached file. always a pleasure working with you again. good bye

Evaluating Credible and Scholarly Scientific Sources
Week Two Assignment
In this assignment, you will examine three different sources - one source that would be considered
scholarly, one source that is credible but not scholarly, and one source that would not be considered
credible for use in an academic paper. After completing a worksheet on each source, can you identify
which is which?
Instructions
When looking up various scientific topics, including the example topic this week on technology and
food production in the U.S., you will find all kinds of information out there. Not all of it is reliable. In
order to determine if a source provides credible information, you will need to take the time to evaluate
that source first before you can trust its content. Who is the intended audience of the source? Who is the
author or publisher and what is their purpose for publishing the resource? These are examples of the
questions you will want to ask yourself when evaluating a source.
Examine these three sources and fill out the following worksheet for each one. You will be determining
what type of source it is (scholarly, credible non-scholarly, and non-credible), its level of credibility, and
its possible value or use within the scientific conversation about technology and agriculture in the U.S.
To help you determine the credibility of a source, refer this quick video tutorial on Evaluating Sources
for Credibility. Additionally, consult the strategies outlined in the CRAAP TEST. Keep in mind that
you are evaluating the sources themselves and not the content within the source, or whether you
agree with the positions or statements that are expressed within the source. Please write your
answers in complete sentences.

Source Links
Source #1:http://www.saynotogmos.org/
Source #2:http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0064879
Source #3:https://www.loc.gov/law/help/restrictions-on-gmos/usa.php

Source #1
1.

What best describes the information within this source (choose all that apply):

Formal report of a study or academic analysis of an issue
Fact sheet / data / statistics
News
Government or organizational website
Opinion piece: expert? Journalist? amateur?
Anecdote / personal experience
Propaganda
What led you to choose this answer? Provide evidence or examples from the text.
The source not only offers opinionated views but offers formal detailed research on how
GMOs have affected society. Further it delves into a conclusion of surveys based on experts in
the field as well as the regulatory and labeling factors surrounding the modification of GMO
products.

2.

Currency: For this topic, is the information…
Up to date
Outdated
Not sure (explain):

3.

The purpose of the information is to:
Inform
Persuade
Entertain
Sell
Other:
What led you to choose ...

flag Report DMCA
Review

Anonymous
The tutor managed to follow the requirements for my assignment and helped me understand the concepts on it.

Anonymous
The tutor was knowledgeable, will be using the service again.

Anonymous
Awesome quality of the tutor. They were helpful and accommodating given my needs.

Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4

Brown University





1271 Tutors

California Institute of Technology




2131 Tutors

Carnegie Mellon University




982 Tutors

Columbia University





1256 Tutors

Dartmouth University





2113 Tutors

Emory University





2279 Tutors

Harvard University





599 Tutors

Massachusetts Institute of Technology



2319 Tutors

New York University





1645 Tutors

Notre Dam University





1911 Tutors

Oklahoma University





2122 Tutors

Pennsylvania State University





932 Tutors

Princeton University





1211 Tutors

Stanford University





983 Tutors

University of California





1282 Tutors

Oxford University





123 Tutors

Yale University





2325 Tutors