Changes on the Western Frontier1870-1900& Launching the new nation1790-1815

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May 25th, 2015

12 The War of 1812 was a military conflict between the United States and Great Britain. As a colony of Great Britain, Canada was swept up in the War of 1812 and was invaded a number of times by the Americans. The process of naming the War of 1812 for its year of commencement, even though it lasted into 1814, developed slowly through the 19th century

13. The Fort itself was important because it guarded Baltimore. The British believed Baltimore to be a base for American Privateers that would sink British ships. Two branches attacked, one on land, successfully stopped in their tracks, and one at sea, that took Fort McHenry and it's men on; they failed. The Morality boost was tremendous for America, and the strategic victory kept Baltimore free.

That is why the Battle of Fort McHenry is a turning point, not only in the War of 1812, but in our National History.

14 Two weeks after the War of 1812 officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Ghent, U.S. General Andrew Jackson achieves the greatest American victory of the war at the Battle of New Orleans. 

In September 1814, an impressive American naval victory on Lake Champlain forced invading British forces back into Canada and led to the conclusion of peace negotiations in Ghent, Belgium. Although the peace agreement was signed on December 24, word did not reach the British forces assailing the Gulf coast in time to halt a major attack.

On January 8, 1815, the British marched against New Orleans, hoping that by capturing the city they could separate Louisiana from the rest of the United States. Pirate Jean Lafitte, however, had warned the Americans of the attack, and the arriving British found militiamen under General Andrew Jackson strongly entrenched at the Rodriquez Canal. In two separate assaults, the 7,500 British soldiers under Sir Edward Pakenham were unable to penetrate the U.S. defenses, and Jackson’s 4,500 troops, many of them expert marksmen from Kentucky and Tennessee, decimated the British lines. In half an hour, the British had retreated, General Pakenham was dead, and nearly 2,000 of his men were killed, wounded, or missing. U.S. forces suffered only eight killed and 13 wounded.

May 25th, 2015

Those are so detailed! Thank you very much!
Do you also have the answers for questions 15-22? :)

May 25th, 2015

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