Essay about studying an article or a website and writing about That article successful​

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timer Asked: Feb 5th, 2018
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Question description

All I need is 4 pages rough draft about an article or a website of anything related to construction management. The essay should be writing about how is article or the website is achieving the goal of sending the message to the audience.

I am going to list the requirements and the full description of the assignment in the files. But I need rough draft with grammar mistakes and incomplete essay by Tuesday 11:59 am February 6 which is tomorrow afternoon estern Time zone. I can have the final draft by Wednesday February 7.

WRIT-201 Project 1: Rhetorical Analysis of Professional Web Text Introduction For Project 1 you will select a web text that represents your professional community and conduct a thorough rhetorical analysis of it in order to form an argument about how well its underlying message is communicated persuasively to its audience. Learning Objectives (you should be able to…) • conduct careful rhetorical analysis of web texts • use appropriate terms of rhetorical analysis • assess the effectiveness of the communication Task and Content Draw on your resources and discoveries about the ways in which professionals in your field communicate (to each other and to the public) and the terms of rhetorical analysis established in Writer/Designer and other class readings. Carefully apply concepts of rhetorical analysis as tools to study a web text established by a professional or professional organization in your field. Describe the page and discuss how its message relates to the rhetorical choices used in its creation. Form an argument about how effectively the page makes its argument. To proceed: 1. Find a professional community web text that represents an interest of yours within your profession or field. Web texts are texts in electronic media written by professionals for professionals in your professional discourse community (i.e, blogs, web sites, etc). A professional association site is a good place to start. Remember, you want one page, not a whole website. 2. Conduct a careful rhetorical analysis of your web text. How does the writer address intended audience, purpose, context, and genre to communicate his/her message? How about the design of the page? How well does the use of modes and design choices reflect the text’s audience, purpose, context, and genre? Use language from Writer/Designer in your analysis. 3. After you have analyzed the web text, create an argument about what the text wants to do and how effectively that purpose is supported by the its rhetorical strategies. You are making an argument about why the text is or isn’t persuasive based on the way it is designed. This essay must include substantial evidence for your claims based on your rhetorical analysis. This evidence must come in multiple forms (quotations, summaries, descriptions of some aspect of the text); however, you must also include some WRIT-201 Project 1: Rhetorical Analysis of Professional Web Text screenshots of specific design elements you’re analyzing. It is way easier to show an image than to describe it. If you need some instruction on how to capture screenshots, see the following link: http://www.take-a-screenshot.org/ Essay Format ● 4-5 pages, double-spaced, standard font ● a thesis statement, body paragraphs that elaborate on the thesis, and a conclusion ● MLA essay format, including a works cited page ● at least 3 non-encyclopedia sources, including the web text itself. -OR- meet with me to discuss a digital/online production of your argument with the same requirements Due Dates Are listed on the Course Calendar. Grading Criteria See below. WRIT-201 Project 1: Rhetorical Analysis of Professional Web Text Grading Criteria: This essay is worth 15% of your final grade: I will grade your essay using the following criteria: Criterion Project match Points Points earned worth Rhetorical analysis 5 worksheet should be complete, thoughtful, and demonstrate careful analysis with examples. The essay/project 15 includes an introduction with a relevant thesis addressing the effectiveness of the text’s argument. There is a brief rhetorical 10 description indicating the intended audience of the webtext, the author, genre, context, etc. perhaps including visual images. Your writing, word choice, 15 organization, choice of examples, and development of points are appropriate for your intended audience (us). You provide full and clear 20 rhetorical analysis of the webtext properly using rhetorical concepts from assigned sources. The project develops a 25 specific (thesis) argument evaluating the WRIT-201 Project 1: Rhetorical Analysis of Professional Web Text effectiveness of the rhetorical strategies used and offering examples, including visuals from the web text. The project is formatted according to MLA, including properly formatted in-text citations and a works cited list. Totals 10 100
Rhetorical Analysis Worksheet This worksheet is designed to enable you to break down the individual elements of your text’s rhetorical situation (author, audience, purpose, context, and genre) and analyze how the design of the text reflects each element. So your task is threefold: Identify each element of the rhetorical situation, describe how the text is designed for each element, and analyze how effectively the text has been designed for each element. Part One What you’re looking for a What is the source: As in, literally what is it? An “About” page for a professional association online, a YouTube video, an article in an online magazine, etc.? Be specific, the answer is not just “a web page.” Author: Who is the person or entity we are to assume created this text? What, if anything, did you know about them before reading the text? What, if anything, do you know about them after reading the text? How does the author represent him, her, or itself via the text (consider things like tone of written content, the physical appearance of the site, etc.)? Audience: Who is the author targeting? Who do they assume/expect will read this text? How do you know—what are the clues in the content and design that seem to be specifically for the intended audience? Purpose: What is the text trying to do? What does the author seem to want the audience to do after having read the text? How do you know— what are the clues in the content and design that seem to indicate some kind of action being taken by the audience? Context: Why does this text exist? In other words, what generated the need or desire for this text? Also, what is the situation in which the audience will be reading this text?—think about format (is the text designed to be read on mobile device on the toilet or waiting in line) and the social, political environment (is there something going on in the world that may shape how/why the audience would be reading the text?) What What you see in the text are the ways the text has been designed to appeal to/reflect/rebel against the social and cultural norms to which the audience may adhere? Genre: How might you define the genre of the text? In other words, how would you categorize this text? If you’re not sure, what other texts is it similar to? What are some of the design choices you noticed that are conventional to the genre? Are there aspects of the text’s design that seem to deviate from genre norms? Part Two Initial Analysis of Design: Based on all that you’ve noted above, how persuasive do you think the text is? Why?

Tutor Answer

toto
School: University of Virginia

Attached.

Rhetorical Analysis Worksheet
Part One
What you’re looking for
a
What is the source: As in, literally what is it?
An “About” page for a professional
association online, a YouTube video, an
article in an online magazine, etc.? Be
specific, the answer is not just “a web page.”
Author: Who is the person or entity we are to
assume created this text? What, if anything,
did you know about them before reading the
text? What, if anything, do you know about
them after reading the text? How does the
author represent him, her, or itself via the text
(consider things like tone of written content,
the physical appearance of the site, etc.)?

What you see in the text
The source of the information is
http://enewsletters.constructionexec.com. It is
an online company offering advisory services
as well as it gives construction companies
suggestions on the best software to use in
order to improve its effectiveness.
Pat Whelan is the author of the article.
Whelan is the CEO and the Founder of
PASKR, Inc, a cloud-based construction
management software company.

Audience: Who is the author targeting? Who
do they assume/expect will read this text?
How do you know—what are the clues in the
content and design that seem to be
specifically for the intended audience?

The target audiences are the construction
companies and contractors who are offering
construction service to clients. They are the
likely audiences because the author suggests
they benefits constructors and companies’
acquires from the use of construction
management software.

Purpose: What is the text trying to do? What
does the author seem to want the audience to
do after having read the text? How do you
know—what are the clues in the content and
design that seem to indicate some kind of
action being taken by the audience?

The author is trying to persuade the target
audience to embrace construction
management software because it minimizes
small tasks and eliminate paperwork.

Context: Why does this text exist? In other
words, what generated the need or desire for
this text? Also, what is the situation in which
the audience will be reading this text?—think
about format (is the text designed to be read
on mobile device on the toilet or waiting in
line) and the social, political environment (is
there something going on in...

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Anonymous
Goes above and beyond expectations !

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