Final Paper Outline

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Naqll27

Business Finance

Description

For this assignment, you will construct a comprehensive outline for the Final Paper, which is due at the end of Week Six. For assistance with creating and formatting your outline, please access the sample outline handout (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. from the Ashford Writing Center.

Your outline must

  • Be three to five double-spaced pages in length (not including the title and references pages) and formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..
  • Detail your chosen issue to be addressed in your Final Paper.
  • Provide a brief history of the U.S. Supreme Court’s philosophy of your chosen issue.
  • Detail your preliminary conclusion about the future of this issue in light of the current makeup of the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • Include a separate title page with the following:
    • Title of paper
    • Student’s name
    • Course name and number
    • Instructor’s name
    • Date submitted
  • Use at least four scholarly sources in addition to the course text, two of which must be from the Ashford University Library.
  • Document all sources in APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.
  • Include a separate references page that is formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.

Carefully review the Grading Rubric (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. for the criteria that will be used to evaluate your assignment.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

CRJ514.W3A1.01.2015 Description: Total Possible Score: 5.00 Details the Chosen Issue to be Addressed in the Final Paper Total: 1.00 Distinguished - Details the chosen issue to be addressed in the Final Paper. Proficient - Details the chosen issue to be addressed in the Final Paper. Minor details are missing. Basic - Minimally details the chosen issue to be addressed in the Final Paper. Relevant details are missing. Below Expectations - Attempts to detail the chosen issue to be addressed in the Final Paper; however, significant details are missing. Non-Performance - The details of the chosen issue to be addressed in the Final Paper is either nonexistent or lacks the components described in the assignment instructions. Provides a History of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Philosophy of the Chosen Issue Total: 2.00 Distinguished - Provides an accurate and comprehensive history of the U.S. Supreme Court’s philosophy of the chosen issue. The history is supported by scholarly sources. Proficient - Provides a history of the U.S. Supreme Court’s philosophy of the chosen issue. The history is supported by scholarly sources but is slightly underdeveloped or inaccurate. Basic - Provides a partial history of the U.S. Supreme Court’s philosophy of the chosen issue. The history is supported by scholarly sources but is underdeveloped and/or inaccurate. Below Expectations - Attempts to provide a history of the U.S. Supreme Court’s philosophy of the chosen issue; however, the history is not supported by scholarly sources but is substantially underdeveloped and inaccurate. Non-Performance - The history of the U.S. Supreme Court’s philosophy of the chosen issue is either nonexistent or lacks the components described in the assignment instructions. Details a Preliminary Conclusion About the Future of the Chosen Issue in Light of the Current Makeup of the U.S. Supreme Court Total: 1.00 Distinguished - Comprehensively details preliminary conclusion about the future of the chosen issue in light of the current makeup of the U.S. Supreme Court. Proficient - Details a preliminary conclusion about the future of the chosen issue in light of the current makeup of the U.S. Supreme Court, but the conclusion is slightly underdeveloped. Basic - Minimally details a preliminary conclusion about the future of the chosen issue in light of the current makeup of the U.S. Supreme Court, but the conclusion is underdeveloped. Below Expectations - Attempts to detail a preliminary conclusion about the future of the chosen issue in light of the current makeup of the U.S. Supreme Court; however, the conclusion is significantly underdeveloped. Non-Performance - The preliminary conclusion about the future of the chosen issue in light of the current make-up of the U.S. Supreme Court is either nonexistent or lacks the components described in the assignment instructions. Written Communication: Control of Syntax and Mechanics Total: 0.25 Distinguished - Displays meticulous comprehension and organization of syntax and mechanics, such as spelling and grammar. Written work contains no errors and is very easy to understand. Proficient - Displays comprehension and organization of syntax and mechanics, such as spelling and grammar. Written work contains only a few minor errors and is mostly easy to understand. Basic - Displays basic comprehension of syntax and mechanics, such as spelling and grammar. Written work contains a few errors which may slightly distract the reader. Below Expectations - Fails to display basic comprehension of syntax or mechanics, such as spelling and grammar. Written work contains major errors which distract the reader. Non-Performance - The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components described in the instructions. Written Communication: APA Formatting Total: 0.25 Distinguished - Accurately uses APA formatting consistently throughout the paper, title page, and reference page. Proficient - Exhibits APA formatting throughout the paper. However, layout contains a few minor errors. Basic - Exhibits limited knowledge of APA formatting throughout the paper. However, layout does not meet all APA requirements. Below Expectations - Fails to exhibit basic knowledge of APA formatting. There are frequent errors, making the layout difficult to distinguish as APA. Non-Performance - The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components described in the instructions. Written Communication: Resource Requirement Total: 0.25 Distinguished - Uses more than the required number of scholarly sources, providing compelling evidence to support ideas. All sources on the reference page are used and cited correctly within the body of the assignment. Proficient - Uses the required number of scholarly sources to support ideas. All sources on the reference page are used and cited correctly within the body of the assignment. Basic - Uses less than the required number of sources to support ideas. Some sources may not be scholarly. Most sources on the reference page are used within the body of the assignment. Citations may not be formatted correctly. Below Expectations - Uses an inadequate number of sources that provide little or no support for ideas. Sources used may not be scholarly. Most sources on the reference page are not used within the body of the assignment. Citations are not formatted correctly. Non-Performance - The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components described in the instructions. Written Communication: Page Requirement Total: 0.25 Distinguished - The length of the paper is equivalent to the required number of correctly formatted pages. Proficient - The length of the paper is nearly equivalent to the required number of correctly formatted pages. Basic - The length of the paper is equivalent to at least three quarters of the required number of correctly formatted pages. Below Expectations - The length of the paper is equivalent to at least one half of the required number of correctly formatted pages. Non-Performance - The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components described in the instructions. Powered by Garnering all of the information about constitutional rights and the justice process you have received from this course and your understanding of the “personalities” of the U.S. Supreme Court, prepare a six to eight page paper (not including the APA title and references pages) in which you detail the history of the Supreme Court from 1953 to the present day as it relates to one of the specific issues listed below. Evaluate the terms of the Warren Court (19531969), the Burger Court (1969-1986), the Rehnquist Court (1986-2005), and the current Roberts Court (2005-present) to your chosen issue, listed below. Examine the political philosophies of each court, and indicate significant changes in the law concerning your chosen issue that was witnessed through each court’s era. Then, examine the current makeup of the U.S. Supreme Court and modern trends in constitutional law and criminal procedure. Based on current trends, discuss whether or not you believe the criminal justice process will fundamentally change or remain the same in the foreseeable future for your chosen issue. Your paper will focus on the court process, judicial process, and constitutional issues for one of the following issues: • • • • • • • The right against self-incrimination and the right to remain silent (U.S. Const. amend. V) The right to privacy for computer, Internet, and cell phone property and communications (U.S. Const. amend. IV) Search and seizure laws as applied to computer, Internet, and cell phone property and communications (U.S. Const. amend. IV) Right to counsel (U.S. Const. amend. VI) Capital punishment and cruel and unusual punishment (U.S. Const. amend. VIII) Right to trial in criminal proceedings (U.S. Const. amend. VI) National security considerations Outline Before you start writing the first draft of your essay or research paper, it is always useful to make an outline of your ideas. If you have already decided on your focus or topic, and you have a rough list of sources for support, then you are ready to prepare an outline. An outline is simply a way to organize your ideas and information. Keep in mind that outlines are required to follow a format style (e.g., APA). The example below is an abbreviated version of what is often referred to as a formal or “traditional” outline. It is based on the five-paragraph essay model and can be expanded or condensed to fit the scope of your essay or research paper. I. Introduction A. Strong Opening B. Thesis Statement II. Body Paragraph #1—Topic Sentence #1 A. Supporting Evidence 1. Name of and information from source 2. Name of and information from source #2 (if applicable) B. Explanation 1. Explanation of source 2. Explanation of source #2 (if applicable) C. So What? III. Body Paragraph #2—Topic Sentence #2 A. Supporting Evidence 1. 2. B. Explanation 1. 2. C. So What? IV. Body Paragraph #3—Topic Sentence #3 A. Supporting Evidence B. Explanation C. So What? V. Conclusion A. Rephrase of Thesis Statement B. Strong Closing Introduction Create a strong opening statement(s) for your paper that generates interest and engages the reader. The Thesis Statement (TS) will be the last 1–3 sentences of the introduction. Supporting Evidence Integrate an appropriate example, quotation, paraphrase, statistic, case study, or other evidence to support your topic sentence. Explanation Explain how this evidence supports your topic sentence. Try to develop your explanation in 2–4 sentences. So What? What is significant or important about the ideas (topic sentence + evidence + explanation) in this paragraph? Remind your reader how all this information connects back to the TS. Conclusion The TS should be rephrased, rather than repeated verbatim, in the first 1–3 sentences of the conclusion. Avoid simply summarizing the main points in the conclusion: synthesize them. Then create closure for your paper. To see what a complete outline looks like, refer to the model below. The thesis statement has been taken from the Thesis Statement Guide section of the Ashford Writing Center. I. Introduction A. Strong Opening In the early days of television, a former Chairman of the Federal Communication Commission, invited television viewers to remain seated in front of their television sets for an entire day. What they would observe, he warned, “…is a vast wasteland” (Minow, 1961, p.3). Fifty years later, many people still agree with that statement. B. Thesis Statement Although television programs can be educational, parents should regulate the amount of television their children watch because programs are not always intellectually stimulating, they can distort a child’s perception of reality, and they inhibits social interaction. II. Body Paragraph #1—Topic Sentence #1 While television has the potential to offer programs that can be seen as educational supplements, too much television has an even greater potential for turning children into passive viewers and getting in the way of intellectual stimulation. A. Supporting Evidence As a recent article from the University of Michigan Health Systems (2008) maintains, “Too much television can negatively affect early brain development. This is especially true at younger ages, when learning to talk and play with others is so important” (qtd. in “Television”). B. Explanation Indeed, too much television can be detrimental to cognitive development because preschool-aged children need physical interaction, and television for older children acts as an unhealthy replacement for reading and being read to. Children need to engage in imaginative play; adolescents and teenagers benefit from getting fresh air and being more active. C. So What? While it would be too easy to dismiss every TV show directed at youths—in fact, PBS and Discovery Kids offer excellent programming—children’s lives are increasingly centered around TV-watching and, thus, parents should regulate how much their kids are viewing regardless of content or perceived quality. III. Body Paragraph #2—Topic Sentence #2 Moreover, without proper supervision or regulation, some television programs can give children a distorted view of the world. A. Supporting Evidence In the online article “How TV Affects Your Child,” Dr. Mary Gavin (2008) points out that “TV characters often depict risky behaviors, such as smoking and drinking, and also reinforce gender-role and racial stereotypes.” B. Explanation Certainly, seeing these types of behaviors and stereotypes exhibited by favorite television personalities and encouraged by favorite shows can contradict the values parents want to instill in their children, which can cause both tension and confusion. While television does have entertainment value, children cannot learn all the differences between right and wrong from it. C. So What? Although it is difficult to prevent children’s total exposure to questionable social mores and limited multicultural representation in the media, parents can have some control by supervising their children’s viewing as well as by talking about what is portrayed on television. IV. Body paragraph #3—Topic Sentence #3 Finally, television can impede healthy relationship-building and impose on family time. A. Supporting Evidence For example, recent studies have found that the television is on most of the time in 51% of households and that “[k]ids with a TV in their bedroom spend an average of almost 1.5 hours more per day watching TV than kids without a TV in the bedroom” (qtd. in “Television”). B. Explanation If children are spending this much time glued to the their favorite television programs, and if parents do not have rules about how much is okay to watch, then children are not only spending less time on important cognitive development activities such as reading and doing homework, but they are also spending less time on social interaction with peers and important family time. C. So What? Given how long families are apart from each other during the week because of school and work, it is unfortunate that any extra time outside of those obligations should be wasted on watching television. Therefore, regulation is one key approach to ensure a family’s closeness and the strength of the parents’ bond with their children. V. Conclusion A. Rephrased Thesis Statement Television can be both educational and entertaining for children; however, only in moderation. Thus, it is important that parents step in to supervise how much television their children watch and to ensure that television programs do not negatively affect their children’s intellectual, psychological, and social development. B. Strong Closing As an alternative to turning on the television after dinner, some parents are substituting family fun nights, with planned activities such as board games or a book club night, where family members share what they learned from recent books they have read. Creative activities such as these combine intellectual stimulation, fun, and important family time. Best of all, they build lifelong family memories.
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Explanation & Answer

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Introduction

Body

Conclusion


Running head: US SUPREME COURT

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US Supreme Court: The Right to Counsel
Name
Professor
Course, No.
Date

US SUPREME COURT

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US Supreme Court: The Right to Counsel
Introduction

The Sixth Amendment accords every suspect or criminal a right to an attorney during the
course of criminal proceedings. If the suspect or defendant is unable to hire a lawyer, he is
entitled to a public defender or the government will settle his legal bills. The assistance of
counsel is pivotal in upholding the defendant’s right to a fair trial whether he or she is an adult or
juvenile (U.S. Constitution Amendment IV). Moreso, this constitution requires that legal counsel
be present at every critical stage of the defendant’s case and that h/she provide effective
presentation. Therefore, a public defender must fulfil this obligation regardless of how much
workload he is juggling. Unfortunately, public defenders are infamous for not representing their
clients adequately and most of these clients end up serving harsher sentences than they would
have if they had a more competent lawyer. There is a dire need for a radical shift within the
criminal justice system in reference to fulfilling the right to counsel for the poor and minorities.
The US Supreme Court has remarkably presided over numerous cases since its inception
in 1789. The court is made up of the Chief Justice and eight associate justices who are proposed
by the sitting president and approved by the Senate. Once confirmed, the justices are expected to
serve lifetime tenure except if they become deceased, retire, or forced to vacate office due to
impeachment. Each justice has a single vote with which they have the power to decide a ruling.
Warren Court (1953-1969)
Earl Warren served as Chief Justice from 1953 to 1969 when he retired. The associates
included Hugo Black, Felix Frankfurter, and William J. Brennan. To the dismay of conservative
brass at the time, Warren demonstrated a more liberal attitude and advanced civil rights and
liberties. One of his most outstanding achievements was ending racial segregation in the US

US SUPREME COURT

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thereby ending the “separate but equal” services, facilities, and opportunities like medical care.
Having served as the governor of California from 1943 to 1953, Warren viewed the law as an
instrument for promoting fairness and equity (Schwartz, 1996). Another remarkable feat came
during the Gideon v. Wainwright case in 1963 when the Supreme Court judges unanimously
passed “the right to counsel” even for people without means to hire lawyer...


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