Exploring Otherness in The Films of Guillermo del Toro Paper

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EWRT 1B Monsters and Misfits: Exploring Otherness in The Films of Guillermo del Toro Outline Draft Due: Wednesday Week 8 Upload to assignment link in Canvas Objectives of this Essay: Critical Thinking, Comparative Literary Analysis, Synthesis, Cultural Studies and Critique, Integration of Evidence, MLA documentation Writing Prompt: Using Cronos, Pan’s Labyrinth, The Shape of Water (and Pinocchio if you have seen it), write an essay analyzing the gothic theme of monstrosity and otherness in the filmmaker Guillermo del Toro’s work. How does monstrosity exist in the human heart and not in appearance? Using at least five sources of scholarship from the chapters and links I have provided to you so far this quarter, explain the gothic theme of monstrosity and then examine the ways that theme gets uniquely expressed by del Toro in at least TWO if not all four of his films. In your thesis, be sure to set yourself apart and make your essay relevant to right now by expressing what you think del Toro's films/themes teach us about ourselves and our thoughts/fears/anxieties about otherness and why that message is especially important today. In other words, try to connect what you're saying about his filmmaking in general to what is happening right now this moment in the news or in our culture. How can you connect del Toro's thoughts on othering to a particular issue facing our culture--a thought/fear/anxiety about otherness we are in conflict over today? If he was making a film right now, who would his monster(s) be and why would he feel compelled to tell their story? Writing Tips: As you ponder this writing prompt, it is imperative you develop your own thesis that says something ABOUT del Toro and monstrosity. I don’t want you to simply define and summarize; I want you to be analytical and reflective. If you hand this task over to ChatGPT, you will remain at the surface with your thinking, just like in the days when you may have reached for Cliff’s Notes when writing about a book you failed to read. You simply can not write well if you haven’t put in the work to understand your material. Be prepared for your grade to reflect superficiality if you do not have an authentic thesis and a grasp of the course content. This outline is intended to help foster your thinking and reflection, and it must be filled out and submitted before your final essay can be graded. Reach out to me if you need help—I am here to answer questions and encourage you! Construct your essay’s argument from the foundation up—using a thesis as your central idea and a series of supporting ideas that explain it. Write strong POINT SENTENCES—your thesis statement and your paragraph openings. These framing sentences are useful architectural structure that help keep you focused, so you can build your essay one point at a time in organized paragraphs. As you explain your reasoning and show your reader why your observations are reasonable, bring in specific scenes from the movies and specific quotations from the articles I have linked you to each week. The scenes, the details, the quoted passages are priceless evidence that helps illustrate your point. You must draw upon a minimum of FIVE of these secondary sources, and you should find them listed on the Canvas page for each film we have studied. There are many to choose from—and when you find helpful commentary related to what you are saying/arguing in a paragraph, integrate the evidence into your discussion. When you allow a source other than yourself to “speak” in your paper, you need to prepare your reader for the new voice. You do that by setting them up with a signal phrase. Note these signals in the highlighted wording below: According to Paul Tassi in his article “There’s Something Your Probably Missed in The Shape of Water,” there may be an explanation for Elisa’s love for the creature. He writes, “the creature makes Elisa feel loved even as a ‘broken’ person who can’t speak, but I do think it’s more than that. I think that the two are possibly the same species.” Given his belief that she has an unnatural affinity for water, he argues she may be part fish in some way . . . . You must sandwich all quotes between a set up signal phrase of your own and a reflection or explanation if it—connect the quoted evidence to your paragraph’s point so you develop and use it—do not just plunk it in there because you have to. MLA format is required--integrate your quotations and cite your sources. COMPOSING YOUR FIRST DRAFT Students must upload this completed outline to Canvas by Wednesday of Week 8 as a pre-requisite for their final essay. If you have not fully completed and uploaded this outline, your essay will not be graded. I encourage you to print this out and use pencil or pen to write out your thoughts—it is a rough draft. Your opening remarks . . . gather your readers around the fire and prepare them for your story, use the language from the writing prompt and tell them what you’re writing about. This section of your essay sets up your paper and it could be one, two or three paragraphs long but it should end with an emphasis on your thesis—the central observation/point you plan to explain in your essay’s body paragraphs. Explain the gothic theme of monstrosity and its traditional depictions in literature State how that theme gets uniquely expressed by del Toro in at least TWO if not all four of his films. Develop a unique perspective of your own. Formulate a statement depicting how you would apply del Toro’s notion of othering to a particular issue facing our culture right now--a thought/fear/anxiety about otherness we are in conflict over today. If he was making a film right now, who would his monster(s) be and why would he feel compelled to tell their story? ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your first stop . . . Take the reader through your first supporting point. It could be an examination of the traditional depictions of monsters in literature. Review your introduction and your thesis—what is the first point your thesis promises to explain? Use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Make explicit references to scenes in the films. Integrate at least one quotation from a secondary source to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your next stop . . . As you pivot to your next idea, write a transition sentence that connects this paragraph to your last paragraph—try to overlap them and show how your last point leads you logically to this next point. You should try to unfold or unravel your thesis and try to show how your points are related—are they two of the same kind of idea? Is this paragraph also about traditional depictions of monsters or are you starting to talk about del Toro’s unique depictions of monsters? Is this next idea a departure or contrast? Is there a causal relationship, meaning the previous point may have caused or contributed to this next one? As your argument unfolds in the body of your essay, you want to be thinking about the relationship between your supporting points and use transition words/phrase/sentences to make connections and insure smooth passageway from one paragraph to the next. Try to logically unravel your thesis. After you formulate this connection between your paragraphs and develop a transition, use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Integrate references to scenes and quotations from secondary sources to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. If you can, make explicit connections between what you’re saying here and your thesis. Tie the point to your thesis. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your next stop . . . As you pivot to this next idea, write a transition sentence that connects this paragraph to your last paragraph or back to your thesis—try to overlap them and show how your last point leads you logically to this next point or how it relates to your thesis. After you formulate this connection between your paragraphs and develop a transition, use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Integrate references to scenes and quotations from secondary sources to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. If you can, make explicit connections between what you’re saying here and your thesis. Tie the point to your thesis. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your next stop . . . As you pivot to this next idea, consider varying your transition style. Are you relying on formulaic first, second, third kinds of transitions? Do the paragraphs all start the same way? Are they mechanical and predictable? Try to write a transition sentence right here that is different. Make it connect this paragraph to your last paragraph or back to your thesis—try to overlap them and show how your last point leads you logically to this next point or how it relates to your thesis. After you formulate this connection between your paragraphs and develop a transition, use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Integrate references to scenes and quotations from secondary sources to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. If you can, make explicit connections between what you’re saying here and your thesis. Tie the point to your thesis. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your next stop . . . As your argument continues to unfold in the body of your essay, make sure you are connecting the reader back to your thesis. Use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Integrate references to scenes and quotations from secondary sources to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. If you can, make explicit connections between what you’re saying here and your thesis. Tie the point to your thesis. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ A Pause for Reflection . . . Is there anything you want to say here? Do you think you need to stop for a minute and pose a question to your reader? Is there something you have learned that you want to emphasize or something profound you want to ask the reader to consider? Is there an epiphany you need to express? Do you have any criticism of the author or of something you’ve uncovered through your analysis. Sometimes its helpful to pause for reflection just before moving toward closure. If you DON”T have anything to pause for and just have more points to make in support of your thesis, keep doing so! This is an optional step—not mandatory. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your closing words . . . wrap up your essay and provide meaningful closure. You should give your reader something to reflect on. DO NOT BE BORING or FORMULAIC. DO NOT SUMMARIZE YOURSELF. DO NOT USE “IN CONCLUSION” You want to have the same effect as a pebble dropped in a pond or as a blown-out candle. Poof! You are gone, but the rising smoke lingers. The pebble sinks to the bottom, but the ripples shimmer on the surface in reverberating waves. You can have this effect if you leave your audience with an image or question. You can call them into action. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Works Cited Tassi, Paul. “There’s Something You Probably Missed in The Shape of Water.” Forbes.com. Mar 5, 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/insertcoin/2018/03/05/theres-something-important you-probably-missed-in-the-shape-of-water/?sh=4fd596b51aa7. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ The entries should look like my example—Indent lines 2+ one tab over so names are on left Alphabetize your entries A-Z EWRT 1B Monsters and Misfits: Exploring Otherness in The Films of Guillermo del Toro Outline Draft Due: Wednesday Week 8 Upload to assignment link in Canvas Objectives of this Essay: Critical Thinking, Comparative Literary Analysis, Synthesis, Cultural Studies and Critique, Integration of Evidence, MLA documentation Writing Prompt: Using Cronos, Pan’s Labyrinth, The Shape of Water (and Pinocchio if you have seen it), write an essay analyzing the gothic theme of monstrosity and otherness in the filmmaker Guillermo del Toro’s work. How does monstrosity exist in the human heart and not in appearance? Using at least five sources of scholarship from the chapters and links I have provided to you so far this quarter, explain the gothic theme of monstrosity and then examine the ways that theme gets uniquely expressed by del Toro in at least TWO if not all four of his films. In your thesis, be sure to set yourself apart and make your essay relevant to right now by expressing what you think del Toro's films/themes teach us about ourselves and our thoughts/fears/anxieties about otherness and why that message is especially important today. In other words, try to connect what you're saying about his filmmaking in general to what is happening right now this moment in the news or in our culture. How can you connect del Toro's thoughts on othering to a particular issue facing our culture--a thought/fear/anxiety about otherness we are in conflict over today? If he was making a film right now, who would his monster(s) be and why would he feel compelled to tell their story? Writing Tips: As you ponder this writing prompt, it is imperative you develop your own thesis that says something ABOUT del Toro and monstrosity. I don’t want you to simply define and summarize; I want you to be analytical and reflective. If you hand this task over to ChatGPT, you will remain at the surface with your thinking, just like in the days when you may have reached for Cliff’s Notes when writing about a book you failed to read. You simply can not write well if you haven’t put in the work to understand your material. Be prepared for your grade to reflect superficiality if you do not have an authentic thesis and a grasp of the course content. This outline is intended to help foster your thinking and reflection, and it must be filled out and submitted before your final essay can be graded. Reach out to me if you need help—I am here to answer questions and encourage you! Construct your essay’s argument from the foundation up—using a thesis as your central idea and a series of supporting ideas that explain it. Write strong POINT SENTENCES—your thesis statement and your paragraph openings. These framing sentences are useful architectural structure that help keep you focused, so you can build your essay one point at a time in organized paragraphs. As you explain your reasoning and show your reader why your observations are reasonable, bring in specific scenes from the movies and specific quotations from the articles I have linked you to each week. The scenes, the details, the quoted passages are priceless evidence that helps illustrate your point. You must draw upon a minimum of FIVE of these secondary sources, and you should find them listed on the Canvas page for each film we have studied. There are many to choose from—and when you find helpful commentary related to what you are saying/arguing in a paragraph, integrate the evidence into your discussion. When you allow a source other than yourself to “speak” in your paper, you need to prepare your reader for the new voice. You do that by setting them up with a signal phrase. Note these signals in the highlighted wording below: According to Paul Tassi in his article “There’s Something Your Probably Missed in The Shape of Water,” there may be an explanation for Elisa’s love for the creature. He writes, “the creature makes Elisa feel loved even as a ‘broken’ person who can’t speak, but I do think it’s more than that. I think that the two are possibly the same species.” Given his belief that she has an unnatural affinity for water, he argues she may be part fish in some way . . . . You must sandwich all quotes between a set up signal phrase of your own and a reflection or explanation if it—connect the quoted evidence to your paragraph’s point so you develop and use it—do not just plunk it in there because you have to. MLA format is required--integrate your quotations and cite your sources. COMPOSING YOUR FIRST DRAFT Students must upload this completed outline to Canvas by Wednesday of Week 8 as a pre-requisite for their final essay. If you have not fully completed and uploaded this outline, your essay will not be graded. I encourage you to print this out and use pencil or pen to write out your thoughts—it is a rough draft. Your opening remarks . . . gather your readers around the fire and prepare them for your story, use the language from the writing prompt and tell them what you’re writing about. This section of your essay sets up your paper and it could be one, two or three paragraphs long but it should end with an emphasis on your thesis—the central observation/point you plan to explain in your essay’s body paragraphs. Explain the gothic theme of monstrosity and its traditional depictions in literature State how that theme gets uniquely expressed by del Toro in at least TWO if not all four of his films. Develop a unique perspective of your own. Formulate a statement depicting how you would apply del Toro’s notion of othering to a particular issue facing our culture right now--a thought/fear/anxiety about otherness we are in conflict over today. If he was making a film right now, who would his monster(s) be and why would he feel compelled to tell their story? ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your first stop . . . Take the reader through your first supporting point. It could be an examination of the traditional depictions of monsters in literature. Review your introduction and your thesis—what is the first point your thesis promises to explain? Use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Make explicit references to scenes in the films. Integrate at least one quotation from a secondary source to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your next stop . . . As you pivot to your next idea, write a transition sentence that connects this paragraph to your last paragraph—try to overlap them and show how your last point leads you logically to this next point. You should try to unfold or unravel your thesis and try to show how your points are related—are they two of the same kind of idea? Is this paragraph also about traditional depictions of monsters or are you starting to talk about del Toro’s unique depictions of monsters? Is this next idea a departure or contrast? Is there a causal relationship, meaning the previous point may have caused or contributed to this next one? As your argument unfolds in the body of your essay, you want to be thinking about the relationship between your supporting points and use transition words/phrase/sentences to make connections and insure smooth passageway from one paragraph to the next. Try to logically unravel your thesis. After you formulate this connection between your paragraphs and develop a transition, use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Integrate references to scenes and quotations from secondary sources to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. If you can, make explicit connections between what you’re saying here and your thesis. Tie the point to your thesis. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your next stop . . . As you pivot to this next idea, write a transition sentence that connects this paragraph to your last paragraph or back to your thesis—try to overlap them and show how your last point leads you logically to this next point or how it relates to your thesis. After you formulate this connection between your paragraphs and develop a transition, use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Integrate references to scenes and quotations from secondary sources to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. If you can, make explicit connections between what you’re saying here and your thesis. Tie the point to your thesis. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your next stop . . . As you pivot to this next idea, consider varying your transition style. Are you relying on formulaic first, second, third kinds of transitions? Do the paragraphs all start the same way? Are they mechanical and predictable? Try to write a transition sentence right here that is different. Make it connect this paragraph to your last paragraph or back to your thesis—try to overlap them and show how your last point leads you logically to this next point or how it relates to your thesis. After you formulate this connection between your paragraphs and develop a transition, use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Integrate references to scenes and quotations from secondary sources to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. If you can, make explicit connections between what you’re saying here and your thesis. Tie the point to your thesis. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your next stop . . . As your argument continues to unfold in the body of your essay, make sure you are connecting the reader back to your thesis. Use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Integrate references to scenes and quotations from secondary sources to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. If you can, make explicit connections between what you’re saying here and your thesis. Tie the point to your thesis. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ A Pause for Reflection . . . Is there anything you want to say here? Do you think you need to stop for a minute and pose a question to your reader? Is there something you have learned that you want to emphasize or something profound you want to ask the reader to consider? Is there an epiphany you need to express? Do you have any criticism of the author or of something you’ve uncovered through your analysis. Sometimes its helpful to pause for reflection just before moving toward closure. If you DON”T have anything to pause for and just have more points to make in support of your thesis, keep doing so! This is an optional step—not mandatory. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your closing words . . . wrap up your essay and provide meaningful closure. You should give your reader something to reflect on. DO NOT BE BORING or FORMULAIC. DO NOT SUMMARIZE YOURSELF. DO NOT USE “IN CONCLUSION” You want to have the same effect as a pebble dropped in a pond or as a blown-out candle. Poof! You are gone, but the rising smoke lingers. The pebble sinks to the bottom, but the ripples shimmer on the surface in reverberating waves. You can have this effect if you leave your audience with an image or question. You can call them into action. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Works Cited Tassi, Paul. “There’s Something You Probably Missed in The Shape of Water.” Forbes.com. Mar 5, 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/insertcoin/2018/03/05/theres-something-important you-probably-missed-in-the-shape-of-water/?sh=4fd596b51aa7. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ The entries should look like my example—Indent lines 2+ one tab over so names are on left Alphabetize your entries A-Z EWRT 1B Monsters and Misfits: Exploring Otherness in The Films of Guillermo del Toro Outline Draft Due: Wednesday Week 8 Upload to assignment link in Canvas Objectives of this Essay: Critical Thinking, Comparative Literary Analysis, Synthesis, Cultural Studies and Critique, Integration of Evidence, MLA documentation Writing Prompt: Using Cronos, Pan’s Labyrinth, The Shape of Water (and Pinocchio if you have seen it), write an essay analyzing the gothic theme of monstrosity and otherness in the filmmaker Guillermo del Toro’s work. How does monstrosity exist in the human heart and not in appearance? Using at least five sources of scholarship from the chapters and links I have provided to you so far this quarter, explain the gothic theme of monstrosity and then examine the ways that theme gets uniquely expressed by del Toro in at least TWO if not all four of his films. In your thesis, be sure to set yourself apart and make your essay relevant to right now by expressing what you think del Toro's films/themes teach us about ourselves and our thoughts/fears/anxieties about otherness and why that message is especially important today. In other words, try to connect what you're saying about his filmmaking in general to what is happening right now this moment in the news or in our culture. How can you connect del Toro's thoughts on othering to a particular issue facing our culture--a thought/fear/anxiety about otherness we are in conflict over today? If he was making a film right now, who would his monster(s) be and why would he feel compelled to tell their story? Writing Tips: As you ponder this writing prompt, it is imperative you develop your own thesis that says something ABOUT del Toro and monstrosity. I don’t want you to simply define and summarize; I want you to be analytical and reflective. If you hand this task over to ChatGPT, you will remain at the surface with your thinking, just like in the days when you may have reached for Cliff’s Notes when writing about a book you failed to read. You simply can not write well if you haven’t put in the work to understand your material. Be prepared for your grade to reflect superficiality if you do not have an authentic thesis and a grasp of the course content. This outline is intended to help foster your thinking and reflection, and it must be filled out and submitted before your final essay can be graded. Reach out to me if you need help—I am here to answer questions and encourage you! Construct your essay’s argument from the foundation up—using a thesis as your central idea and a series of supporting ideas that explain it. Write strong POINT SENTENCES—your thesis statement and your paragraph openings. These framing sentences are useful architectural structure that help keep you focused, so you can build your essay one point at a time in organized paragraphs. As you explain your reasoning and show your reader why your observations are reasonable, bring in specific scenes from the movies and specific quotations from the articles I have linked you to each week. The scenes, the details, the quoted passages are priceless evidence that helps illustrate your point. You must draw upon a minimum of FIVE of these secondary sources, and you should find them listed on the Canvas page for each film we have studied. There are many to choose from—and when you find helpful commentary related to what you are saying/arguing in a paragraph, integrate the evidence into your discussion. When you allow a source other than yourself to “speak” in your paper, you need to prepare your reader for the new voice. You do that by setting them up with a signal phrase. Note these signals in the highlighted wording below: According to Paul Tassi in his article “There’s Something Your Probably Missed in The Shape of Water,” there may be an explanation for Elisa’s love for the creature. He writes, “the creature makes Elisa feel loved even as a ‘broken’ person who can’t speak, but I do think it’s more than that. I think that the two are possibly the same species.” Given his belief that she has an unnatural affinity for water, he argues she may be part fish in some way . . . . You must sandwich all quotes between a set up signal phrase of your own and a reflection or explanation if it—connect the quoted evidence to your paragraph’s point so you develop and use it—do not just plunk it in there because you have to. MLA format is required--integrate your quotations and cite your sources. COMPOSING YOUR FIRST DRAFT Students must upload this completed outline to Canvas by Wednesday of Week 8 as a pre-requisite for their final essay. If you have not fully completed and uploaded this outline, your essay will not be graded. I encourage you to print this out and use pencil or pen to write out your thoughts—it is a rough draft. Your opening remarks . . . gather your readers around the fire and prepare them for your story, use the language from the writing prompt and tell them what you’re writing about. This section of your essay sets up your paper and it could be one, two or three paragraphs long but it should end with an emphasis on your thesis—the central observation/point you plan to explain in your essay’s body paragraphs. Explain the gothic theme of monstrosity and its traditional depictions in literature State how that theme gets uniquely expressed by del Toro in at least TWO if not all four of his films. Develop a unique perspective of your own. Formulate a statement depicting how you would apply del Toro’s notion of othering to a particular issue facing our culture right now--a thought/fear/anxiety about otherness we are in conflict over today. If he was making a film right now, who would his monster(s) be and why would he feel compelled to tell their story? ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your first stop . . . Take the reader through your first supporting point. It could be an examination of the traditional depictions of monsters in literature. Review your introduction and your thesis—what is the first point your thesis promises to explain? Use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Make explicit references to scenes in the films. Integrate at least one quotation from a secondary source to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your next stop . . . As you pivot to your next idea, write a transition sentence that connects this paragraph to your last paragraph—try to overlap them and show how your last point leads you logically to this next point. You should try to unfold or unravel your thesis and try to show how your points are related—are they two of the same kind of idea? Is this paragraph also about traditional depictions of monsters or are you starting to talk about del Toro’s unique depictions of monsters? Is this next idea a departure or contrast? Is there a causal relationship, meaning the previous point may have caused or contributed to this next one? As your argument unfolds in the body of your essay, you want to be thinking about the relationship between your supporting points and use transition words/phrase/sentences to make connections and insure smooth passageway from one paragraph to the next. Try to logically unravel your thesis. After you formulate this connection between your paragraphs and develop a transition, use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Integrate references to scenes and quotations from secondary sources to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. If you can, make explicit connections between what you’re saying here and your thesis. Tie the point to your thesis. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your next stop . . . As you pivot to this next idea, write a transition sentence that connects this paragraph to your last paragraph or back to your thesis—try to overlap them and show how your last point leads you logically to this next point or how it relates to your thesis. After you formulate this connection between your paragraphs and develop a transition, use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Integrate references to scenes and quotations from secondary sources to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. If you can, make explicit connections between what you’re saying here and your thesis. Tie the point to your thesis. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your next stop . . . As you pivot to this next idea, consider varying your transition style. Are you relying on formulaic first, second, third kinds of transitions? Do the paragraphs all start the same way? Are they mechanical and predictable? Try to write a transition sentence right here that is different. Make it connect this paragraph to your last paragraph or back to your thesis—try to overlap them and show how your last point leads you logically to this next point or how it relates to your thesis. After you formulate this connection between your paragraphs and develop a transition, use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Integrate references to scenes and quotations from secondary sources to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. If you can, make explicit connections between what you’re saying here and your thesis. Tie the point to your thesis. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your next stop . . . As your argument continues to unfold in the body of your essay, make sure you are connecting the reader back to your thesis. Use a strong “point sentence” that tells your reader what this paragraph will explain/develop in support of your thesis. Integrate references to scenes and quotations from secondary sources to help illustrate your point and show your reader how you arrived at this point based upon the data/evidence you analyzed. If you can, make explicit connections between what you’re saying here and your thesis. Tie the point to your thesis. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ A Pause for Reflection . . . Is there anything you want to say here? Do you think you need to stop for a minute and pose a question to your reader? Is there something you have learned that you want to emphasize or something profound you want to ask the reader to consider? Is there an epiphany you need to express? Do you have any criticism of the author or of something you’ve uncovered through your analysis. Sometimes its helpful to pause for reflection just before moving toward closure. If you DON”T have anything to pause for and just have more points to make in support of your thesis, keep doing so! This is an optional step—not mandatory. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Your closing words . . . wrap up your essay and provide meaningful closure. You should give your reader something to reflect on. DO NOT BE BORING or FORMULAIC. DO NOT SUMMARIZE YOURSELF. DO NOT USE “IN CONCLUSION” You want to have the same effect as a pebble dropped in a pond or as a blown-out candle. Poof! You are gone, but the rising smoke lingers. The pebble sinks to the bottom, but the ripples shimmer on the surface in reverberating waves. You can have this effect if you leave your audience with an image or question. You can call them into action. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Works Cited Tassi, Paul. “There’s Something You Probably Missed in The Shape of Water.” Forbes.com. Mar 5, 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/insertcoin/2018/03/05/theres-something-important you-probably-missed-in-the-shape-of-water/?sh=4fd596b51aa7. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ The entries should look like my example—Indent lines 2+ one tab over so names are on left Alphabetize your entries A-Z
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If the outline is good, I will use it to write the draft. Thanks
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Ai Report


EWRT 1B Monsters and Misfits: Exploring Otherness in The Films of Guillermo del Toro
Outline Draft Due: Wednesday Week 8 Upload to assignment link in Canvas
Objectives of this Essay: Critical Thinking, Comparative Literary Analysis, Synthesis, Cultural
Studies and Critique, Integration of Evidence, MLA documentation
Writing Prompt: Using Cronos, Pan’s Labyrinth, The Shape of Water (and Pinocchio if you have
seen it), write an essay analyzing the gothic theme of monstrosity and otherness in the filmmaker
Guillermo del Toro’s work. How does monstrosity exist in the human heart and not in
appearance? Using at least five sources of scholarship from the chapters and links I have
provided to you so far this quarter, explain the gothic theme of monstrosity and then examine the
ways that theme gets uniquely expressed by del Toro in at least TWO if not all four of his films.
In your thesis, be sure to set yourself apart and make your essay relevant to right now by
expressing what you think del Toro's films/themes teach us about ourselves and our
thoughts/fears/anxieties about otherness and why that message is especially important today. In
other words, try to connect what you're saying about his filmmaking in general to what is
happening right now this moment in the news or in our culture. How can you connect del Toro's
thoughts on othering to a particular issue facing our culture--a thought/fear/anxiety about
otherness we are in conflict over today? If he was making a film right now, who would his
monster(s) be and why would he feel compelled to tell their story?
Writing Tips: As you ponder this writing prompt, it is imperative you develop your own thesis that says something ABOUT
del Toro and monstrosity. I don’t want you to simply define and summarize; I want you to be analytical and reflective. If you
hand this task over to ChatGPT, you will remain at the surface with your thinking, just like in the days when you may have
reached for Cliff’s Notes when writing about a book you failed to read. You simply can not write well if you haven’t put in the
work to understand your material. Be prepared for your grade to reflect superficiality if you do not have an authentic thesis and a
grasp of the course content. This outline is intended to help foster your thinking and reflection, and it must be filled out and
submitted before your final essay can be graded. Reach out to me if you need help—I am here to answer questions and encourage
you!
Construct your essay’s argument from the foundation up—using a thesis as your central idea and a series of supporting
ideas that explain it. Write strong POINT SENTENCES—your thesis statement and your paragraph openings. These framing
sentences are useful architectural structure that help keep you focused, so you can build your essay one point at a time in
organized paragraphs.
As you explain your reasoning and show your reader why your observations are reasonable, bring in specific scenes from the
movies and specific quotations from the articles I have linked you to each week. The scenes, the details, the quoted passages are
priceless evidence that helps illustrate your point. You must draw upon a minimum of FIVE of these secondary sources, and you
should find them listed on the Canvas page for each film we have studied. There are many to choose from—and when you find
helpful commentary related to what you are saying/arguing in a paragraph, integrate the evidence into your discussion. When you
allow a source other than yourself to “speak” in your paper, you need to prepare your reader for the new voice. You do that by
setting them up with a signal phrase. Note these signals in the highlighted wording below:
According to Paul Tassi in his article “There’s Something Your Probably Missed in The Shape of Water,” there may be an
explanation for Elisa’s love for the creature. He writes, “the creature makes Elisa feel loved even as a ‘broken’ person who can’t
speak, but I do think it’s more than that. I think that the two are possibly the same species.” Given his belief that she has an
unnatural affinity for water, he argues she may be part fish in some way . . . .
You must sandwich all quotes between a set up signal phrase of your own and a reflection or explanation if it—connect the
quoted evidence to your paragraph’s point so you develop and use it—do not just plunk it in there because you have to.
MLA format is required--integrate your quotations and cite your sources.

COMPOSING YOUR FIRST DRAFT
Students must upload this completed outline to Canvas by Wednesday of Week 8 as a pre-requisite for their final
essay. If you have not fully completed and uploaded this outline, your essay will not be graded. I encourage you
to print this out and use pencil or pen to write out your thoughts—it is a rough draft.
Your opening remarks . . . gather ...


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