Science
Can you please revise my individual project?

Question Description

Review at least 1 other student's Key Assignment Outline and provide meaningful feedback. Refrain from general feedback, such as simply stating "good job." Your feedback to other students is most helpful if you not only point out weak areas but also offer suggestions for improvement. The best feedback takes a three-stage approach to identify what was done well, weaknesses, and areas for improvement.

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Table of Contents Project Outline (Week 1) .............................................................................................................................. 2 Brief Description ....................................................................................................................................... 2 Major Issues to Consider for This Project ................................................................................................. 2 Project Proposal ........................................................................................................................................ 4 Development Methodology (Week 1) .......................................................................................................... 5 Description ................................................................................................................................................ 5 Justification ............................................................................................................................................... 6 Requirements (Week 2) ................................................................................................................................ 8 Approach for Gathering Requirements .................................................................................................... 8 Implement Process and Define Requirements ......................................................................................... 9 Requirements Elicitation Process Description ........................................................................................ 16 Requirement Analysis ............................................................................................................................. 18 Design (Week 2) .......................................................................................................................................... 19 System/Application Architecture Description ........................................................................................ 19 System Architecture Component Diagram ............................................................................................. 20 Application Component Diagram............................................................................................................ 20 Application Class Diagram....................................................................................................................... 21 Component Use Cases ............................................................................................................................ 21 Main Screen Mockup .............................................................................................................................. 25 Data Management Requirements .......................................................................................................... 25 Development (Week 3) ............................................................................................................................... 27 Summary of Methodology ...................................................................................................................... 27 Key Processes .......................................................................................................................................... 29 Testing (Week 3) ......................................................................................................................................... 31 Key Phases Subject to Testing ................................................................................................................. 31 Test Cases................................................................................................................................................ 31 Project Schedule (Week 4) .......................................................................................................................... 36 Risk Analysis (Week 5) ................................................................................................................................ 37 References .................................................................................................................................................. 38 Project Outline (Week 1) Brief Description Arno Appelgryn, Cody Delagardelle, Cornell Hall, and Mari Johnson have been assigned to Group 2 for this course. The group has been tasked with developing a software engineering project document for a Web-based mobile responsive portal application for a bank’s customer account system. The portal application shall provide bank customers with various features that will enable them to effectively manage their accounts from a desktop or mobile device. Some features include account overview, making payments, and more. Please refer to the Project Proposal section below for a high-level overview with further details. The project will be stakeholder driven with a reasonably flexible budget but will require balance to be found between the stakeholders and the requirements. The goal is to complete the project within six months, 180 days, with an additional buffer of three months, 90 days, for requirement changes, scope shifts, and milestone updates. Major Issues to Consider for This Project As with any software engineering project, there are major issues to consider, plan for, and prevent by any means possible to aid in the project’s success. This project will have the following list of issues to look out for: • Executive stakeholders want the most accurate budget for the project up front – Project leads must be ready to help set and stick to the agreed upon budget for the project while maintaining the most accurate estimates of when tasks will be completed. Effective management will require prioritizing critical features and removing non-critical tasks that may send the project over budget. • Requirements are vague, may need to be adapted to business rules, or take the project in the wrong direction – It will be critical to the project to ensure all requirements meet the standards of the stakeholders but also present the most feasible solution for the overall project. It is imperative to make the decision to change or even reengineer a requirement that may cause a major issue in the project or software later. Any issues like these, shall be reviewed and remediated to ensure that project is executed properly and produces the intended outcome. • Deploying the portal system may present unwanted issues and not look, feel, and run as intended – It is important to understand all aspects and complexities of the software before it is prepared for deployment. The approach for the project must be to determine, implement, and test all needed configurations for the project as early as possible. Much like building the foundation for a house, the underlying architecture for the software must be built properly to ensure stability and performance. This solution must provide the most simplified implementation possible to aid in further modification when needed. • Portal system may have a need for upgrades to key components in the future – The end of this project will not eliminate the need for further work to be completed. Consideration must be given to when updates are needed for frameworks, plugins, and other components that make the software function properly. These kinds of upgrades must be noted and planned for with ample enough to develop a strategy and budget for implementation. • Portal system may have bugs and issues when it runs in a production environment – No software is one-hundred percent perfect. Any software may have bugs or other issues that will present situations that will need remediation. The key is to develop a service level agreement that will help in finding solutions for these kinds of problems and escalate critical issues back to the project team for further research and development of a fix to ensure resolution. Project Proposal The proposal for this project encompasses the development of a Web-based mobile responsive portal application for a banking system. This application shall provide bank customers with the following features: • • • • • Account Overview Screen Payments o Make a Payment o Set Recurring Payments o View Payment Activity Rewards and Benefits o View Rewards and Benefits Center o View Rewards Activity o View How to Earn Points o Using Earned Points Services o View FICO Score o View Activated Cards o Set Privacy Options o Request Credit Line Increase o Manage PIN o Alerts Profile o Change Address and Phone o Change Email Address o Change Username o Add/Change/Delete Bank Account The proposal with the above features to be produced by this project has been submitted to professor Frederick for approval which was received with the message to move forward with the project idea. The project will commence to produce the individual projects and final group project for this course. Development Methodology (Week 1) Description The project will implement an Agile: Scrum development methodology which will produce environment where project requirements can be easily adapted. The methodology’s iterative nature focuses on what is known as sprints that can span a timeline of 2-4 weeks. The key components of the methodology are the product owner, Scrum master, team members, and the sprint/product backlog (Gurendo, 2015). The product owner ensures all stories contained in the product backlog have complete requirement information and are prioritized according to the direction of the major stakeholders for the project. The product owner will have meetings with the stakeholders during every sprint iteration to provide status updates, gather/update requirements where needed, and prioritize the product backlog for future sprints (QASymphony). The product owner will also have story grooming sessions with team leads to help narrow down the requirements for each prioritized story in the backlog. The Scrum master drives short, 15-minute, daily meetings known as Scrum meetings to gather updates on the tasks each team member is currently working on (Gurendo, 2015). The main function of the Scrum master is to uncover any impediments for team members and eradicate them as soon as possible. Additionally, the Scrum master keeps everyone on track during Scrum meetings by preventing anyone from going of topic (QASymphony). The final two pieces of the process are the sprint planning and the retrospective meeting. The sprint planning meeting requires the product owner to present/describe each prioritized story in the product backlog and have the team member assigned to the story to provide the most accurate estimate of the work to be completed for it. The sprint will start once all team members have been assigned adequate stories to work for the sprint and daily Scrum meetings will be held during this period. Once the sprint has been completed, a retrospective meeting is held to give team members a chance to talk about issues faced and lessons learned. Additionally, the sprint may produce a functioning prototype or demonstration which is presented to the project stakeholders for feedback. All this information is record and logged appropriately and utilized to drive the next sprint for improved efficiency. Justification Agile: Scrum has been chosen for this product to provide the best adaptability to requests made by the project stakeholders. Obviously, not all requests will always be fulfilled because then the scope creep of the project will become unmanageable and the project will most certainly have missed deadlines and no key milestones. The methodology focuses on keeping stakeholders accountable for their business decisions and teaching them to understand that, in some cases, adding an additional feature will require giving up another feature in the product backlog (QASymphony). The iterative nature of the methodology allows for flexibility to make changes to the product backlog while the product backlog presents each feature set as small manageable user stories. Nonetheless, it consistently helps everyone understand what the capabilities of the project are with respect to the resources that are available. The possible presentation of a working prototype during retrospective meetings also allows the stakeholders to gain visibility on the software solution’s look and feel early in the project timeline (QASymphony). This will help bridge the gap between the business and technical knowledge of this project by ensuring the right questions are asked and the information is properly shared between the stakeholders and the project team. By eliminating as much confusion as possible, the tasks for this project can be completed more efficiently and the artifacts will also be more accurate in meeting requirements. All these benefits will best aid in the completion of this project within the required timeframe while providing the best visibility on the status of the overall project. Requirements (Week 2) Approach for Gathering Requirements The requirements gathering process will begin with the product owner, developers, testers, and the rest of the stakeholders meeting to discover and map out the high-level features of the system (Reichert, 2014). The focus will be on building a product backlog for the project that is well prioritized and satisfies the needs of the stakeholders. The approach, known as Story Mapping, will be utilized to move through the required application functionality in a top-down manner (Parekh, Story Mapping, Visual Way of Building Product Backlog, 2015). Everyone, mentioned above, must continue to meet over a timeframe of 2-3 weeks to properly uncover all functions and features the application must have. The key is create a collaborative environment that fosters dynamic discussions and helps everyone build a visual picture of the user’s journey through the system, understand what the product backlog architecture will look like, and determine what the requirements must be for each user story (Reichert, 2014). Additionally, the developers and testers can begin to size up each project task and begin estimating the level of effort that will be required to complete them (Parekh, Story Mapping, Visual Way of Building Product Backlog, 2015). This period will be referred to as sprint iteration 0 which will mark the start of the project before actual technical work begins. Implement Process and Define Requirements The following are photos taken of the sticky notes used to build the story map for this project. Each has a descriptive explanation the product feature it covers. Login, Account Overview, and Payments Feature View/Manage Rewards & Benefits and Manage User Account Profile Feature Manage User Account Profile Feature (Continued) The sticky notes are a visual representation of the features the portal application needs to provide the bank customer. The information is written down and structured in a manner that displays the architecture of the product backlog for the project. The following is a list of the Epics/Tasks describing a specific feature set and the User Stories linked to them which contain the conditions of satisfaction. The CoS, conditions of satisfaction, will be the term utilized for the requirements criteria in a User Story. This project has been assigned the project key CAP which stands for customer account portal. Feature Epic/Tasks User Story w/ CoS User Account Access Login Login Page for Portal Application (CAP-1) As a bank portal user, I can navigate to the login screen of the customer account portal using a desktop/mobile Web browser, so I can enter my username/password and click a button to login and view my account information and other portal functions. Priority Level: High User Account Access Login User Account Access Login Conditions of Satisfaction • Make sure the bank corporate website has a link to redirect to the login page • The login page needs to contain a text field to enter a username and a text field to enter a password • The login page needs to contain a checkbox with the option “Remember Username” • The login page need to contain a “Log In” button Reset Username/Password Page (CAP-2) As a bank portal user, I can click a link if I have forgotten my account username or password, so I can verify my identity and retrieve account username or reset my account password. Priority Level: High Conditions of Satisfaction • The login page needs to contain a link with the text “Forgot username or password?” • Once clicked, the link needs to redirect to the identity verification page (See CAP-3 for details) • Once customer has successfully passed identity verification input, the system needs to send an email containing the account username and a link to reset the account password to email address tied to the account Customer Identification Page (CAP-3) As a new/existing bank portal user, I can verify my identity with three pieces of information, so I can access my account information. Priority Level: Medium Conditions of Satisfaction • An identity verification page must display when the following links on the login page are clicked: o “Forgot username or password?” o “Create online account” • The identity verification page needs to contain text input fields for the following inputs: o Last 4 digits of customer SSN ▪ Input need to be masked in the following format “xxxx” o Customer Date of Birth o Customer Account Number o Each of the above input fields need to have input validation with error messages if validation fails • The identity verification page needs to contain a “Cancel” button to be redirect back to the login page • User Account Access Login User Account Access Login The identity verification page needs to contain a “Continue” button to commence identity verification and a redirect • Once verification is successfully completed the verification page needs to redirect the customer to the appropriate page based on the link that was clicked Create Online Account Page (CAP-4) As a bank customer with a new account, I can navigate the login screen and click the new account link, so I can verify my identity and create an online account with which to access all my account information. Priority Level: High Conditions of Satisfaction • The login page needs to contain a message “New Account Holder?” accompanied by a link with the text “Create online account” • Once clicked, the link needs to redirect to the identity verification page (See CAP-3 for details) • Once customer has successfully passed identity verification input, the customer needs to be redirected to the new account page containing text input fields for the following inputs: o Username ▪ Needs to have a validation check to see if username is available o Address line 1 (Required) o Address line 2 (Optional) o City (Required) o State (Select List) (Required) o Zip (Required) o Phone Number (Required) • The new account page needs to contain a “Cancel” button to be redirect back to the login page • The new account page needs to contain a “Create Account” button to create the customer’s account • Once account creation is complete, the customer needs to be redirect to the account overview page Customer Account Overview Page (CAP-5) As a logged in bank portal user, I can display portal home page, so I can see a navigation bar for access to all account functionality and a snapshot of my account. Priority Level: High Conditions of Satisfaction • The account overview page needs to contain a navigation bar with the following option list titles (left to right) User Account Transactions Payments o Home o Payments o Rewards and Benefits o Services o Profile • The acco ...
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Final Answer

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Running head: SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

Assignment review
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Running head: SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
This assignment involved designing of a mobile responsive banking system application by a
number of students and their intention is to develop it within 180 days plus another 90 days for changes
that may occur in the requirements. I tend to believe this is quite a lot of time for such a project taking
so much time of about 9 months to be fully complete. The group should consider reducing the much
time on the development process since more time would imply more expenses on the budget to meet
labor costs and any other related costs. The team should have considered hiring more professional
experts who would complete the project at a maximum of three months and probably 2 months for the
change in requirements. The logic I’m putting on this timeline is because if say they were developing a
system for a new banking system or probably an existing banking system that needs to upgrade, this
would mean that people have to wait f...

New York University

Anonymous
Thanks for the help.

Anonymous
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Anonymous
Tutor was very helpful and took the time to explain concepts to me. Very responsive, managed to get replies within the hour.

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