Writing
Outline Sheet

Question Description

I have to read the attached article (2 pages) and based on that article I will be writing paper ( pages) about "Violent Video Games" . NOW I'm in OUTLINE STAGE

Please fill the outline below as you be writing 6 pages paper about "Violent Video Games"

I attached the blank documnet to fill it out and I attched the orginal artcile that i will be writing based on.


Instructions: Complete each portion of the outline in complete paragraphs of at least 150 words or more. Please use complete sentences and reference page numbers/and/or paragraphs numbers in each response, so I can reference your notes.

Introduction

Your thesis statement: Identify whether you believe the essay you are critiquing is effective or ineffective (or both) and offer some main reasons why you believe this.

Body of the Essay Section One

The thesis of the argument/essay you are evaluating.

Body of the Essay Section Two

Who is the intended audience?Who is the ideal audience? What does the writer hope the audience will do?

Body of the Essay Section Three

* What common values/concerns does the author include would be shared with the ideal audience (common ground)?

* Identify and trace the author’s tone about the events and people in the essay.Show the shifting of tone by identifying each.

Body of the Essay Section Four

* Discuss the author’s use of pathos, emotional appeals and ethos, appeals to authority (credibility).Be sure to comment on his/her word choices.

* Does the writer use euphemisms?What is their intended affect on the essay’s readers?

* Evaluate the writer’s logic.Do you notice any logical fallacies in the arguments?

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Step #2: Notes/Organizing Your Evaluating an Extended Argument Essay Outline Instructions: Complete each portion of the outline in complete paragraphs of at least 150 words or more. Please use complete sentences and reference page numbers/and/or paragraphs numbers in each response, so I can reference your notes. Introduction Your thesis statement: Identify whether you believe the essay you are critiquing is effective or ineffective (or both) and offer some main reasons why you believe this. Body of the Essay Section One The thesis of the argument/essay you are evaluating. Body of the Essay Section Two Who is the intended audience? Who is the ideal audience? What does the writer hope the audience will do? Body of the Essay Section Three * What common values/concerns does the author include would be shared with the ideal audience (common ground)? * Identify and trace the author’s tone about the events and people in the essay. Show the shifting of tone by identifying each. Body of the Essay Section Four * Discuss the author’s use of pathos, emotional appeals and ethos, appeals to authority (credibility). Be sure to comment on his/her word choices. * Does the writer use euphemisms? What is their intended affect on the essay’s readers? * Evaluate the writer’s logic. Do you notice any logical fallacies in the arguments? Chapter 2 Thinking and Reading Critically young man buys two guns and then kills 32 students and himself in his expression of his “right to bear arms.” When will we ever learn? EXERCISE 2.7 The following letter to the editor of a college newspaper takes a position on the issue of how violent media—in this case, video games—influence young people. Read the letter, highlighting and annotating it. Now, consider how this letter is similar to and different from Gerard Jones’s essay (pp. 58–61). First, identify the writer’s thesis, and restate it in your own words. Then, consider the benefits of the violent video games the writer identifies. Are these benefits the same as those Jones identifies? In paragraph 4, the writer summarizes arguments against her position. Does Jones address any of these same arguments? If so, does he refute them in the same way this writer does? Finally, read the letter’s last paragraph. How is this writer’s purpose for writing different from Jones’s? This letter to the editor was published on October 22, 2003, in Ka Leo o Hawai‘i, the student newspaper of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. DON’T WITHHOLD VIOLENT GAMES JESSICA ROBBINS Entertainment and technology have changed. Video games today are more graphic and violent than they were a few years ago. There is a concern about children being influenced by the content of some of these video games. Some states have already passed laws which ban minors from the viewing or purchasing of these video games without an accompanying adult. I believe this law should not exist. Today’s technology has truly enriched our entertainment experience. Today’s computer and game consoles are able to simulate shooting, killing, mutilation, and blood through video games. It was such a problem that in 1993 Congress passed a law prohibiting the sale or rental of adult video games to minors. A rating system on games, similar to that placed on movies, was put into place, which I support. This helps to identify the level of violence that a game might have. However, I do not believe that this rating should restrict people of any age from purchasing a game. Currently there is no significant evidence that supports the argument that violent video games are a major contributing factor in criminal and violent behavior. Recognized universities such as MIT and UCLA described the law as misguided, citing that “most studies and experiments on video games containing violent content have not found adverse effects.” In addition, there actually 1 2 3 69 ! 70 Part 2 Reading and Responding to Arguments are benefits from playing video games. “There actually are They provide a safe outlet for aggression benefits from playing and frustration, increased attention performance, along with spatial and coordivideo games.” nation skills. Some argue that there is research that shows real-life video game play is related to antisocial behavior and delinquency, and that there is need for a law to prevent children from acting out these violent behaviors. This may be true, but researchers have failed to indicate that this antisocial and aggressive behavior is mostly shortterm. We should give children the benefit of the doubt. Today’s average child is competent and intelligent enough to recognize the difference between the digital representation of a gun and a real 28-inch military bazooka rocket launcher. They are also aware of the consequences of using such weapons on real civilians. Major software companies who create video games should write Congress and protest this law on the basis of a nonexistent correlation between violence and video games. If the law is modified to not restrict these games to a particular age group, then these products will not be unfairly singled out. Writing a Critical Response Sometimes you will be asked to write a critical response—a paragraph or more in which you analyze ideas presented in an argument and express your reactions to them. Before you can respond in writing to an argument, you need to be sure that you understand what the writer means to get across and that you have a sense of how ideas are arranged—and why. You also need to consider how convincingly the writer conveys his or her position. If you have read the argument carefully, highlighting and annotating it according to the guidelines outlined in this chapter, you should have a good idea what the writer wants to communicate to readers as well as how successfully the argument makes its point. Before you begin to write a critical response to an argument, you should consider the questions in the checklist on the facing page. When you write your critical response, begin by identifying your source and its author; then, write a clear, concise summary of the writer’s position. Next, analyze the argument’s supporting points one by one, considering the strength of the evidence that is presented. Also consider whether the writer addresses all significant opposing arguments and whether those arguments are refuted convincingly. Quote, summarize, and paraphrase the writer’s key points as you go along, being careful to quote accurately and not to misrepresent the writer’s ideas or distort them by quoting out of context. (For information on summarizing, paraphrasing, quoting, and synthesizing sources, see Chapter 9.) As you write, identify 4 5 ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

Surname 1

Name
Professor
Course
Date
Essay Critique Outline
Introduction
The effectiveness of an essay largely depends on the clarity expression and flow of ideas
in the essay. While the intrinsic worth of arguments and ideas must be maintained at a high level
in any argumentative essay, an effective essay must be cohesive and be such that ideas flow
logically throughout the essay. The essay should, therefore, contain appropriate links between
sentences and paragraphs as well as within the sentences and paragraphs. The author should also
make effort to provide direction and focus to the reader by using appropriate language to the
audience. Effective essays also employ the appropriate use of argumentative appeals such as
logos, pathos and ethos. The author should therefore be able to prove to the audience that he/she
is worth presenting the argument to the audience. The author can prove his/her worthiness by
providing personal experience, using expert support, using an appropriate writing style and
providing a common ground with the audience. The author should also employ an appropriate
use of facts, precedents, examples, and appeal to authority. The author should also engage the
audience emotionally if the essay has to be effective. Since the essay under consideration
satisfies most of the requirements ...

achiaovintel (7640)
Purdue University

Anonymous
Thanks for the help.

Anonymous
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Anonymous
Tutor was very helpful and took the time to explain concepts to me. Very responsive, managed to get replies within the hour.

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