Why does diversity matter?

Anonymous
timer Asked: May 27th, 2018
account_balance_wallet $50

Question Description

please read all the file that i provided. and follow the prompt to finish the paper. pls use MLA format


Paper 3 Prompt

Why does diversity matter? In what context? For example, does diversity matter in the workplace, educational settings, relationships (e.g., friendships, marriages), or just society in general? Does diversity ever bring negative consequences? Why or why not?

Writing: Identify a certain context in which diversity matters and argue why it should be promoted or rejected.


Module 3 - Introduction

Diversity can be defined as people coming together from different races, nationalities, religions, ages, and sexes to form a group, organization or community. Valuing diversity can bring about advantages to society because it unites people from different backgrounds, skills, attitudes and experiences to bring fresh ideas and perceptions. However, it can also bring about disadvantages because diversity means difference in all manner and form.

In this module, you will read about why diversity matters in certain contexts. Then you will have an opportunity to make your own argument about why diversity matters in certain contexts, such as the workplace, school, in marriage, in friendship, etc.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Paper 3, Draft 0 Rubric Good Passing Not Acceptable Good • Demonstrates clear understanding of prompt • Includes ideas that are relevant to the topic *There is enough material to work with and organize in the next draft. Passing • Demonstrates some understanding of prompt • Includes ideas but some may be irrelevant or off-topic *There is some material to work with and organize in the next draft. Not Acceptable • Demonstrates minimal understanding of prompt • Includes ideas which are mostly irrelevant or off-topic *There is not enough material to work with and organize in the next draft. Although a student may demonstrate understanding of prompt, a lack of ideas can result in a low grade. *Minimum 1.5 pages Paper 3, Draft 1 Rubric Excellent 90-100% Very Good 8089% Passing 73-79% Needs Improvement 60-72% Not Acceptable 0-59% Content and Organization • • • • • • • Includes adequate introductory information about the topic but which may need to be revised or replaced in a subsequent draft* Includes a clear thesis that responds to the prompt appropriately but which may need to be revised or replaced in a subsequent draft* Organizes and develops the topic/argument logically and thoughtfully Demonstrates understanding of the class text, connecting it to the topic Makes sufficient use of the class text for support Reflects original ideas and critical thinking Includes a conclusion that engages the readers but which may need to be revised or replaced in a subsequent draft to better support argument and previous text* Presentation and Language • • • • • Uses most tenses correctly Uses specific verbs such as claims, argues, suggests as well as academic vocabulary Varies sentence structure effectively and uses cohesive devices such as pronoun reference, transitions, and parallelism appropriately Is well edited for grammar: few basic errors with nouns, verbs, pronouns, and prepositions Follows punctuation and MLA conventions, including correct use of quotation marks and integrating quotes as evidence Paper 3, Draft 2 Rubric Excellent 90-100% Very Good 8089% Passing 73-79% Needs Improvement 60-72% Not Acceptable 0-59% Content and Organization • • • • • • • • Includes adequate introductory information about the topic but which may need to be revised or replaced in a subsequent draft* Includes a clear thesis that responds to the prompt appropriately but which may need to be revised or replaced in a subsequent draft* Organizes and develops the topic/argument logically and thoughtfully Demonstrates understanding of the class text, connecting it to the topic Makes sufficient use of the class text for support Reflects original ideas and critical thinking Includes a conclusion that engages the readers but which may need to be revised or replaced in a subsequent draft to better support argument and previous text* Demonstrates progress from the previous draft Presentation and Language • • • • • • Uses tenses correctly Uses specific verbs such as claims, argues, suggests as well as appropriate vocabulary Varies sentence structure effectively and uses cohesive devices such as pronoun reference, transitions, and parallelism appropriately Is well edited for grammar: few basic errors with nouns, verbs, pronouns, and prepositions Follows punctuation and MLA conventions, including correct use of quotation marks and integrating quotes as evidence Shows improvement in grammar and punctuation from the previous draft Paper 3, Final Draft Rubric Excellent 90-100% Very Good 8089% Passing 73-79% Needs Improvement 60-72% Not Acceptable 0-59% Content and Organization • • • • • • • • Includes adequate introductory information about the topic Includes a clear thesis that responds to the prompt appropriately Organizes and develops the topic/argument logically and thoughtfully Demonstrates understanding of the class text, connecting it to the topic Makes sufficient use of the class text for support Reflects original ideas and critical thinking Includes a conclusion that engages the readers Demonstrates progress through the drafting process Presentation and Language • • • • • • Uses tenses correctly Uses specific verbs such as claims, argues, suggests as well as appropriate vocabulary Varies sentence structure effectively and uses cohesive devices such as pronoun reference, transitions, and parallelism appropriately Is well edited for grammar: few basic errors with nouns, verbs, pronouns, and prepositions Follows punctuation and MLA conventions, including correct use of quotation marks, and integrating quotes as evidence Shows improvement in grammar and punctuation during the drafting process PAPER 3 – DISCUSSION AND BRAINSTORM Prompt: Why does diversity matter? Consider the following contexts below. Discuss these contexts in pairs or groups and determine the advantages (pros) and disadvantages (cons) of diversity in those contexts. The first one has been filled out for you. Use this as an example. Then, come up with other backgrounds in which that can matter. Context Marriage/ Dating Pros and Cons of Diversity Pros: My partner comes from a different ethnicity. It’s so interesting to learn about his culture and heritage, and to try all the authentic dishes in his culture. Cons: Since he doesn’t understand my language, he can’t watch some of my favorite television shows with me or laugh about the same jokes. Personal opinion: I still think that as long as we love each other, being different in some ways is okay. After all, no two people are exactly alike and learning about each other’s different viewpoints and learning to appreciate them can help us to reflect on ourselves and become more mature individuals. Besides, the differences sometimes make life so much more fun! Friendships Pros: Cons: Personal opinion: Movies/Music/Entertainment World Pros: Cons: Personal opinion: Standard of Beauty Pros: Cons: Personal opinion: Educational Institutes/Students/Instructors Politics/Government When I Learned the Value of Diversity for Innovation By Stephanie Hill 1 - I was a young African-American woman in 1996, determined to do my best at Lockheed Martin, one of the world's foremost technology companies, when I was named to lead an integrated-product team for a mission-critical U.S. Navy program. I was confident in my abilities as a software engineer, and I had been intimately involved in writing the program requirements. But the scope of the program was much broader than software development. We were tasked with creating an advanced launch control unit peripheral for a navy vertical-launch system. 2 - Our challenge was to take a legacy system, based on a 16-bit computer with a rudimentary keypad input and tape cartridge device, and design a new unit that incorporated off-the-shelf technology—a 166-megahertz PowerPC VME processor and a touch-screen graphical user interface. This was before the iPad, when touch screens were a big deal. It was one of the navy's first ventures into forwardcompatible, off-the-shelf technology. The system also had to be ruggedized to withstand a near-miss explosion. And we had to deliver it quickly and affordably. 3 - Given the complexity, deadline and the amount of innovation required for the program, we needed every ounce of original thinking from people of many different backgrounds, both professional and personal. Our team of about 30 individuals had several people of color and several women, which was significant for my industry at the time, and a healthy mix of experience and youth. I had to establish an atmosphere of inclusion across race, gender and age diversity. 4 - It was the diversity of professional expertise on the team that proved to me that an inclusive, sharing environment is imperative to success. We had systems, software, and electrical and human factors engineers. We had experts in shock attenuation, electromagnetic pulses and testing simulation systems. And we needed to engage all of them in a give-and-take dialogue in which ideas were stood up, picked apart and modified to become stronger with each iteration. 5 - It was the kind of environment that not only benefits from diversity, it demands it. And because we were successful in establishing and managing it, we were also successful in delivering the capability that the customer required. 6 - As a leader, I had to set the tone for people to express their ideas, even if they differed from those of their colleagues. I would not allow someone's ideas to be dismissed without consideration. I also established an environment where people felt safe in asking questions that often go unasked because everybody is afraid of being the only one who doesn't already know the answer. Asking those questions early in a discussion gets us past them (because, in truth, many other people have them, too) and allows us to use our time more efficiently. 7 - Among my biggest concerns as a leader is that I will allow the best idea in the room to go unexpressed because someone did not feel comfortable enough to express it. 8 - Once I found myself sitting next to a young engineer in a roomful of more experienced colleagues. I noticed he had something he wanted to say, but he was always a split second late in gaining the floor. After this had gone on for a while, I stopped the discussion, turned to him and asked for his opinion. He proceeded to make a suggestion that nobody else had considered. It was risky, and the group was skeptical. Eventually we adopted his idea, and it resulted in completely winning over a customer. 9 - Perhaps the most important outcome of my experience as team leader was that it helped me evolve my understanding of diversity into a broader concept of inclusion. Diversity of age, gender, skin color, ethnicity, and more—the attributes of a diverse workplace that are the first to come to mind—is often visible and easy to identify and requires focus to engage and develop. The presence of diversity that you can see is often an indicator of an inclusive environment that embraces diversity of thought. A team dynamic that opens the door to inclusion will elicit ideas that spring from varied professional, educational and social experiences. 10 - It's a truism that the best teams are greater than the sum of their parts. I believe that is only true when those parts are diverse. When everyone looks the same, acts the same and thinks the same, is it any wonder that they often fail to embrace—or even produce—innovative and unconventional ideas? 11 - I am fortunate to work for an organization that not only understands that concept but makes a conscious choice to live by it. To choose otherwise would be to resign ourselves to comfortable mediocrity—and that will never be a viable option in the pursuit of excellence. Source: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/when-i-learned-the-value-ofdiversity-for-innovation/ COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS 1. What is the author’s occupation and what happened to her in year 1996? 2. What challenges did the author and her team face? 3. Describe the team that the author led. How many people were on the team? What types of people were on the team? 4. As a team leader, what were the author’s responsibilities? 5. What does the author say is the most important outcome of her experience as a team leader? 6. Explain the truism “the best teams are greater than the sum of their parts” and the author’s perspective about this truism. (Paragraph 10) AUTHOR’S CRAFT 1. What important background information does the author give in paragraph 1? 2. Why is the information in paragraph 2 important for the reader’s understanding of paragraph 3? 3. How are paragraphs 7 and 8 related? 4. Why do you think the author asks a question at the end of paragraph 10? 5. In the first sentence in paragraph 11, what is “that concept” referring to? 6. How does the author emphasize and summarize her main point in paragraphs 10 and 11? Houston’s Diversity is America’s Future By Francie Diep 1 - Influxes of African, Asian, and Latino Americans helped Houston's metro area avoid economic stagnation. Could an expected demographic shift on the national level end up reviving other troubled cities? 2 - Houston is a window into the future of America. In 1970, the city was an oil town that was about one-quarter black and three-quarters white, with just a smattering of folks of other origins. Since the oil-price bust of 1982, however, growth in the city and metropolitan area has come almost entirely from influxes of African, Asian, and especially Latino Americans. These new Houstonians came to work in construction and service, and as professionals in the expanding Texas Medical Center. During the same period, the white population, much of which had originally come to the region for oil jobs, hardly grew at all. 3 - The result? What was once a "biracial Southern city," as Rice University sociologist Stephen Klineberg put it, is now one of America’s most diverse metropolitan areas. In fact, by one measure of diversity—how evenly distributed the population is between blacks, whites, Latinos, and Asians—it beats out New York and Los Angeles. By 2060, the Census Bureau predicts the country will follow, roughly, in Houston's footsteps, with no single race claiming a majority of the population. 4 - What have these demographic shifts meant for Houston, and what will they do to the country? As the city's demographic make-up shifted, so did its attitudes. Houstonians became slightly more likely to be Democrats, and slightly less likely to be Republicans. With every passing year, their support for immigrants, including the undocumented, grows. 5 - There were tensions initially because some longtime residents worried that the new immigrants wouldn't assimilate, says Klineberg, who has lived in the city for 45 years and surveyed its residents regularly since 1982. But as a generation of United States-born children grew up, he saw those worries fade. 6 - "It's very hard to summon up fears of perfect-English-speaking people," he says. "We are falling in love with each other, marrying, making multiracial babies, in a way that transforms the whole experience." 7 - It helped that Houston had plenty of land to develop, so many residents didn't see the racial composition of their neighborhoods change drastically: Some research has shown that these types of shifts can make people less willing to pay taxes for public goods, such as infrastructure and schools. 8 - Klineberg thinks the city's newest residents helped it survive in the wake of the oil bust, during which more than 225,000 people lost their jobs and hundreds of Texas banks failed. Although some research indicates that diversity can reduce community trust and engagement, some economists think that ethnic diversity in cities helps make them more productive, perhaps because workers of different backgrounds have disparate ideas and skills. At least in classrooms, diversity has been shown to promote more innovative thinking. Other studies show cities with significant numbers of foreign-born residents tend to grow faster than cities without them, and to support higher average wages for native-born residents (although some people may take a pay cut). There's even evidence that, in some cases, immigrants can help revive cities on the decline. 9 - "If Houston had not become a magnet for the new urban growth of the last 30 years, Houston would have lost population, would have had the same fate as other major American cities that are losing their statuses as major cities because they've basically stopped growing for 35 years: Philadelphia, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, Detroit," Klineberg says. "No city has benefited from immigration more than Houston, Texas." Source: https://psmag.com/magazine/houstons-diversity-is-americas-future COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS 1. What does the author mean by “Houston is a window into the future of America”? (paragraph 2) 2. Why type of city was Houston in 1970, and what brought about change? How did the city change afterward? 3. How does sociologist Stephen Klineberg describe Houston? 4. What effect did demographic shifts have on the city of Houston? 5. Why were there some tensions in Houston in the early stages of its demographic shifts? 6. According to Stephen Klineberg, what would have been the consequences if Houston had not become such an attractive place for immigrants over the last 30 years? AUTHOR’S CRAFT 1. How is the question posed in paragraph 1 (2nd sentence) related to the author’s main argument? 2. Why is Houston compared to New York and Los Angeles in paragraph 3? Why do you think the author specifically chose to reference New York and Los Angeles? 3. In paragraph 7, the author references research. What do you think is the author’s purpose for doing this? 4. Identify the claim the author is making in paragraph 8 and all of the different types of evidence that is given in support of the claim. The Answer To Implicit Racism Might Be In Children's Literature By Noah Berlatsky 1 - Could diverse protagonists reduce racial anxiety? 2 - Children's literature is a vast sea of white. 3 - Children’s literature is not a diverse space. Of 3,200 children's books published in 2013, only 67 were written by African-American writers, and only 93 centered on black characters. That's actually the lowest tally recorded since 1994, when the Cooperative Children's Book Centre began collecting data. Children's books didn't do much better with American Indian, Asian, or Latino kids. For children of color, children's books offer few role models and few heroes who look like them. 4 - The bulk of the discussion around diversity focuses on the need, as YA writer Amy McCulloch says, "to make sure children see themselves represented in literature." But there's another side to this lack of diversity. White kids, and, for that matter, white adults, might need diverse literature as much as people of color do. 5 - Why do white people need diverse media? One answer, according Ebony Elizabeth Thomas, an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education, is that a lack of diversity can have detrimental effects on white as well as black self-images. She points to teen shows on the CW Television Network where, even in comparison to the 1990s, "Almost all the women are size 0," and there's a narrow range of acceptable beauty standards. "I think it's really important for white people to have diverse literature, media, and a diverse culture," she says, "because it takes some of the pressure off whiteness," and a unitary image of what perfect bodies, or perfect heroes, look like or can be. 6 - A new paper from the Perception Institute offers another reason to support this idea. The report, "Addressing Implicit Bias, Racial Anxiety, and Stereotype Threat in Education and Health Care," doesn't discuss kid's literature or media directly. But it does provide a framework for seeing racism as a problem lodged in perceptions— often, and especially, in white perceptions. "[M]ost Americans," the report points out, "espouse values of racial fairness." And yet, despite that, racial disparities are both brutal and entrenched. The We Charge Genocide project, for example, reports that between 2009 and 2013, blacks made up 75 percent of police shooting victims in Chicago, even though black people represent only 33 percent of the city's population. And, in another register, at a recent National Book Awards ceremony, host Daniel Handler made a series of racist remarks about black award winner Jacqueline Woodson. Handler apologized, and pledged matching donations to the "We Need Diverse Books" Indiegogo campaign—but even his contrition emphasized the dynamic at play. 7 - Americans largely believe in equality, but from po ...
Purchase answer to see full attachment

Tutor Answer

Marrie
School: UT Austin

...

flag Report DMCA
Review

Anonymous
Thanks, good work

Brown University





1271 Tutors

California Institute of Technology




2131 Tutors

Carnegie Mellon University




982 Tutors

Columbia University





1256 Tutors

Dartmouth University





2113 Tutors

Emory University





2279 Tutors

Harvard University





599 Tutors

Massachusetts Institute of Technology



2319 Tutors

New York University





1645 Tutors

Notre Dam University





1911 Tutors

Oklahoma University





2122 Tutors

Pennsylvania State University





932 Tutors

Princeton University





1211 Tutors

Stanford University





983 Tutors

University of California





1282 Tutors

Oxford University





123 Tutors

Yale University





2325 Tutors