essay (3 pages) do not plagiarize! read the instructions clearly

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Question description

please use chicago manual of style

below have two file, one is the writing guide and another one is the instruction. You only need to choose one film to write! please read through those instructions carefully!

3 pages ( without workcite)

MSCR 1100: Film 101 Midterm Essay (2–3 Pages) Due via Turnitin on the course blackboard, 11:00 PM, Sunday, June 10. Late papers are marked down 5% for each day it is late. Select one of the three options. Presenting some of the salient points from the corresponding text, conduct a formal analysis of the sequence from the film, provided in the “Midterm Essay Clips” folder within the blackboard “Papers” folder (where Turnitin submissions are completed). You can address other aspects of the film that are relevant, including a brief plot summary if necessary, or other formal elements that shed some light on the ways cinematography, editing, and sound (respectively) is employed, but this should be kept to a minimum. After a brief overview of the author’s primary claims, emphasize those passages from the texts most relevant to your interpretation of the scene. Using the appropriate formal terms, describe in detail key examples how the film conveys its message and/or applies to the terms and concepts presented by the author. In other words, go for depth rather than breadth. Option 1: Vertigo, Cinematography, & Laura Mulvey Address Laura Mulvey’s arguments in “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” by analyzing Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958), and, in particular, the clip in which Scottie (James Stewart) first observes “Madeleine” (Kim Novak). Option 2: The Battle of Algiers, Editing, & Robert Stam & Louise Spence Robert Stam’s and Louise Spence’s arguments in “Colonialism, Racism, and Representation” by analyzing The Battle of Algiers (Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966), and, in particular, the clip in which the three women plant bombs in the French quarter. Option 3: M, Film Sound, & Mary Anne Doane Address Mary Anne Doane’s arguments in “The Voice in Cinema” by analyzing M (Fritz Lang, 1931), and, in particular, the clip opening the film in which Elsie disappears. For additional guidance on particular things to look for in each film and clip, and/or questions to address with your analysis, see the lecture notes for each film, as well as the discussion board prompts for that class. Whether you paraphrase or quote, include in-text citation, footnotes, or endnotes, you must cite accordingly. You are also expected to provide a bibliography (even though it is just one text, this is an important habit). You do not need to do any additional research—and, in fact, should not incorporate other sources for your interpretation of the academic text or film. See the texts in the “Writing Guides” folder for additional information on citing sources. Through this process, I suggest you: 1. Write down anything about a specific image, sound, figure, camera movement, or series of shots that best illustrates your topic. 2. Paraphrase in a paragraph or two the overall argument of the academic text/s you would like to incorporate. 3. Define the key terms from the text/s that are most relevant to your argument, and explain why these are helpful. Five-Paragraph Structure for 2–3-Page Papers While there is no singular formula for writing a strong film analysis, and while I certainly do not require that you follow this structure, this is one option to keep in mind as you outline your papers. 1. Thesis Paragraph Maps out what you want to say (your argument) and how you will say it (your method), including both the supporting text/s and terms, and examples from the films. 2. Terms, Quotes, or Supporting Texts Lays out the key relevant concept/s from your source, and reiterates how you will apply—or challenge— these with your examples. 3. Example 1 If necessary, provide a brief, one- or two-sentence context for your example. In around two sentences, describe all relevant aspects of the example, using the formal terms. In a couple of sentences, elaborate on its relevance to your thesis and central concepts. 4. Example 2 Same as example 1, but perhaps referencing first example as a counterpoint. 5. Conclusion With the supporting concepts, ties the two examples together into a synthesis (a new idea or insight that emerges through this juxtaposition). It does not restate the thesis paragraph (which tells the reader where we are going), and does not list the points the covered in the previous paragraphs, but provides a sense of closure while also—paradoxically—suggesting new spaces to explore. For additional guidance on writing a film analysis essay, refer to The Film Experience, Chapter 12: “Writing a Film Essay: Observations, Arguments, Research, and Analysis,” and the texts provided in the blackboard “Writing Guides” folder.
MSCR 1100: Film 101 Writing Guide FILM, BOOK, OR ESSAY TITLES Italicize or underline film and book titles. You typically also include the film’s director and date in parentheses the first time you mention the film in your paper; this may be important if you want to stress the historical context or sequence of your films discussed. Examples: Do the Right Thing (Spike Lee, 1989) Or, if the filmmaker is already addressed: Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009) In a sentence: Spike Lee confronts the viewer with racial tensions brought to the boiling point in Do the Right Thing (1989). Place in quotes articles and essays: “A Theater of Interruptions” THE HISTORICAL PRESENT AND PARANTHETICAL INFORMATION Most textual analysis and commentary is written in a form of the present tense called the historical present (or literary present). This applies to films and to written works. The idea is that the events or ideas expressed or represented in a text continue, even after you read or watched it. This can get a little complicated when you alternate between recounting a past event (Jean Renoir directed this film in 1937, or Walter Benjamin wrote his first draft in 1934) and the content itself (Renoir’s film implies that national differences can be overcome; In the film, Renoir insinuates that groups are bound by class—note that this refers to the film as well as the filmmaker). Example: In Taxi Driver (Martin Scorsese, 1976) Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro) rehearses his gun-slinging before the mirror. First, note that the character does theses things in the film, not the actor—although you could say “Jodie Foster’s character gets into the car…” It is not always necessary, or even helpful, to always include the actor’s name—particularly when he or she is relatively unknown or plays a minor character. Once you have provided the parenthetical information you don’t need to do it again. For example, you may have a line a few paragraphs later: In Taxi Driver’s climatic confrontation, Travis shoots Sport (Harvey Keitel) on his way to rescue Iris. As a side note, I use the possessive on the film title here, but only italicize the film itself (not the apostrophe-s). WHEN TO CITE AND WHEN NOT TO CITE If in doubt, it is better to site your source. In general, it is not necessary to cite the lecturing professor, unless it is absolutely clear that she/he is giving a specific opinion, and not simply presenting that week’s readings, or common knowledge. It is not necessary to cite, or place in quotations, things that are considered common knowledge. For example: “World War I was devastating for Europe,” does not need to be quoted or cited. If you are pulling a fact from a book, it may be best not to place it in quotes but use your own language. It is important that you cite this in the paragraph or as a footnote. For example: In 1929, France made 68 features, while the United States produced 526 (Bordwell and Thompson 2003: 85). Textbooks like The Film Experience are great sources for historical contexts and formal definitions, but it is not recommended that you structure your paper around them, for they tend to provide general overviews rather than present specific arguments. It is great to use quotes, but don’t let a quote stand in for your own thoughts. Quotes should serve to reference an author’s unique point of view, an issue that you want to address further. Make sure that these quotes are not simply dropped in, but are well integrated in your argument and have a clear link. FIVE-PARAGRAPH STRUCTURE FOR 2-PAGE PAPERS 1. Thesis Paragraph Maps out what you want to say (your argument) and how you will say it (your method), including both the supporting text/s and terms, and examples from the films. 2. Terms, Quotes, or Supporting Texts Lays out the key relevant concept/s from your source, and reiterates how you will apply—or challenge— these with your examples. 3. Example 1 If necessary, provide a brief, one- or two-sentence context for your example. In around two sentences, describe all relevant aspects of the example, using the formal terms. In a couple of sentences, elaborate on its relevance to your thesis and central concepts. 4. Example 2 Same as example 1, but perhaps referencing first example as a counterpoint. 5. Conclusion With the supporting concepts, ties the two examples together into a synthesis (a new idea or insight that emerges through this juxtaposition). It does not restate the thesis paragraph (which tells the reader where we are going), and does not list the points the covered in the previous paragraphs, but provides a sense of closure while also—paradoxically—suggesting new spaces to explore.

Tutor Answer

Nicholas I
School: New York University

Hi, kindly find attached

Running Head: THE BATTLE OF ALGIERS, EDITING, & STAM & SPENCE
1

The Battle of Algiers, Editing, & Stam & Spence
Student’s Name
Institution
Date

THE BATTLE OF ALGIERS, EDITING, & STAM & SPENCE

2

In the Film the Battle of Algiers colonialism, racism and representation are among the
central themes portrayed in the play. Robert Stam’s and Louise Spence’s have arguments on the
three subjects which they base on the film. Notably, they find their arguments on the part of the
movie where three women plant some bombs in the French Quarter. Stam and Spence take a
judgmental view on the 21st-century film's impacts on race and culture. In the paper, an
argument on the three themes will be presented in a concise and objective perspective. Besides,
the discussion will be rooted from the definition and description of the critical terms like racism
and colonization. It will also be based on the argument of Robert Stam and Louise Spence on
Colonialism, racism, and representation as in their attempt to explain these issues from a political
...

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Anonymous
Top quality work from this guy! I'll be back!

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