Writing
POS500 Grand Canyon University United States Constitution Day Celebration Presentation

POS500

Grand Canyon University

Question Description

Create a 12-15 slide PowerPoint presentation to educate a group of students or adults about the core tenets listed above for an upcoming Constitution Day celebration in a school setting. You may select a grade level 1-12, teachers, or parents as your audience. Please specify your intended audience and include other pertinent information within the presenter’s notes. Your presentation should be engaging and appropriate for your chosen audience.

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Constitution Day Presentation Erin McLinsky Grand Canyon University: POS-500 May 2, 2018 Objectives Today we are going to learn about the core tenets of the United States Constitution: • Separation of powers • Checks and balances • Federalism • Judicial review • Limited government • Popular sovereignty (Illustrations of Objectives, n.d.) Separation of Powers • There are three branches of government. They are the executive (carries out laws), legislative (they make the laws), and the judicial branch (courts that decide if laws are legal or have been broken). • Each of the three branches of government are separate. They each have their own unique powers that the other two branches of government cannot mess with. • The legislative branch is the only branch who can declare war. (U.S. Government for Kids, n.d.) Separation of Powers • If any branch of the government oversteps its boundaries, the other branches can correct it. • People are safe because of the separation of power. • Limits and controls are imposed on all branches of a government through checks and balances. This is done by giving each branch the right to change or void certain things that the other branches do. • The Commander-in-Chief of the Army is the President of the United States. • The President can dictate the strategy and orders of the military. Checks and Balances: The Executive Branch • The President and his Cabinet • The President can make treaties with other nations • The President carries out laws • The President can veto bills passed by Congress if he does not believe that they are correct • The President appoints judges in the Judicial Branch for a life term • The President writes the national budget • The President can refuse to enforce a law on the nation (Nov 2-6 Constitution and Bill of Rights- Mrs. Moreno, n.d.) Checks and Balances: The Legislative Branch • Consists of Congress (House of Representatives and the Senate) • Congress creates laws • Congress can refuse to pass bills • Congress can overturn a veto on a bill done by the President with a two-thirds vote • Congress can refuse to ratify treaties • Congress can refuse to approve a Presidential appointment • Congress can impeach or fire a judge or the President for misconduct • Congress approves treaties and budgets • Congress approves the President’s choices for offices (Nguyen, 2011) Checks and Balances: The Judicial Branch • The Judicial Branch is led by the Supreme Court • The Judicial Branch interprets (understands) laws • The Judicial Branch has the right to state laws are unconstitutional • The Judicial Branch has the right to say if decisions made by the President are unconstitutional • Members of the Judicial Branch hold their office for life Federalism Federalism is when power is split by the federal, state, and local governments. Federal and state governments share the power to: • Create taxes • Borrow money • Create laws • Create court systems Federalism: The Federal Government The Federal Government can: • Declare war • Control trade • Create post offices and federal government offices • Create money Federalism: The State Government Governments of states can: • Create schools • Control trade with other states • Create laws for the state • Creates marriage and divorce laws (Federalism Examples for Kids, n.d.) Judicial Review • Judicial review was created to make sure that laws, decisions, or actions by the other branches of the government (or lower courts) were constitutional (legal) • The Supreme Court can determine if laws, judicial decisions, and decisions made by the government are constitutional • Judicial review was created in the early 1800’s under the case of Marbury v. Madison Judicial Review Judicial review allows for state laws and actions to be overridden by the Supreme Court Topics that are brought up in front of the Supreme Court include: • • • • • • Executive actions/orders Regulations by government agencies Actions or laws made by Congress Actions or laws made by State Actions or laws made by local government Judicial errors Judicial Review Cases that used Judicial Review • Ladue v. Gilleo, 1994 • Harper v. Virginia Board of Elections, 1966 • Miranda v. Arizona, 1966 • Weeks v. United States, 1914 • United States v. Nixon, 1974 • Plessey v. Ferguson, 1869 (Judicial Branch of Government for Kids, n.d.) Limited Government • The first and basic principle of the Constitution is limited government • The first three words of the Preamble talk about limited government • The first three words of the Preamble state that the government only exists because the people of the United States want it to exist (“We the people”) • The federal government does not have any God-given powers • The federal government only has power because the people choose for it to have power • The federal government does not have all the power • The federal government cannot do anything unless the people allow for the government to do it Limited Government • Limited government is seen throughout the Constitution • The Constitution lists items that the government cannot do (Three Branches of Government (for kids), 2012) Limited Government • Popular sovereignty influenced the idea of limited government • The government has authority only under the people of the United States • The government only has what powers the people choose to give to it • The Constitution states what powers the federal government has and does not have (Ancient Inventions for Kids, n.d.) Popular Sovereignty • Popular sovereignty means that the federal government was made by the people • Popular means representing to benefit the people of the United States • The United States and its people are sovereign • Since the United States and its people are sovereign, it means that we control our own government • The people have the power in the United States • The federal government is controlled by the will of the people (Power to the People, n.d.) Popular Sovereignty • John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau created the idea of popular sovereignty • Benjamin Franklin (one of the founding fathers) developed the concept in America (Popular Sovereignty, n.d.) Popular Sovereignty • Popular sovereignty was used as the foundation for the United States’ breakaway from Great Britain • The Declaration of Independence was written by Thomas Jefferson • The Declaration of Independence rid America of British rule and created the American government • The Declaration of Independence was influenced by popular sovereignty • The Declaration of Independence declares that, “All men are equal and have unalienable rights such as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” (Declaration of Independence, n.d.) References • 7 Principles of the Constitution. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://www.government-and-constitution.org/us-constitution/7-principles-of-theconstitution.htm • Ancient Inventions for Kids. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://ancienthistory.mrdonn.org/inventions.html • Constitution: Travel Back in Time. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://www.congressforkids.net/Constitution_checksandbalances.htm • Constitutional Topic: Separation of Powers - The U.S. Constitution Online. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://usconstitution.net/consttop_sepp.html • Declaration of Independence. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://www.politicususa.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/declaration-ofindependence.jpg • Federalism Examples for Kids. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://pixshark.com/federalism-examples-for-kids.htm References • Illustration of Objectives. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://www.dreamstime.com/stock-illustration-objectives-play-cubes-computer-generatedimage-image44714580 • Judicial Branch of Government for Kids. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://government.mrdonn.org/judicialbranch.html • Judicial Review. (2005). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Judicial_review • Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia Federalism. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://encyclopedia.kids.net.au/page/fe/Federalism • Nguyen, T. (2011). AP Gov Blog. Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://tomsapgovblog.blogspot.com/2011/10/similemetaphor-for-seperation-of-powers.html • Nov 2-6 Constitution and Bill of Rights - Mrs. Moreno. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://sites.google.com/a/springisd.org/mrs-moreno-5th-grade/history/nov-2-6constitution-and-bill-of-rights References • Popular Sovereignty. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://www.sliderbase.com/images/referats/333b/(9).PNG • Popular Sovereignty Definition for Kids. (2016). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://healthresearchfunding.org/popular-sovereignty-definition-for-kids/ • Power to the People. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://cdn.thinglink.me/api/image/592077624885379073/1240/10/scaletowidth • Separation of Powers. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Separation_of_powers • Three Branches of Government (for kids). (2012). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://generationnation.org/index.php/learn/entry/three-branches-ofgovernment-for-kids • U.S. Government for Kids. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://mrnussbaum.com/government/ Constitution Day Presentation Erin McLinsky Grand Canyon University: POS-500 May 2, 2018 Objectives Today we are going to learn about the core tenets of the United States Constitution: • Separation of powers • Checks and balances • Federalism • Judicial review • Limited government • Popular sovereignty (Illustrations of Objectives, n.d.) Separation of Powers • There are three branches of government. They are the executive (carries out laws), legislative (they make the laws), and the judicial branch (courts that decide if laws are legal or have been broken). • Each of the three branches of government are separate. They each have their own unique powers that the other two branches of government cannot mess with. • The legislative branch is the only branch who can declare war. (U.S. Government for Kids, n.d.) Separation of Powers • If any branch of the government oversteps its boundaries, the other branches can correct it. • People are safe because of the separation of power. • Limits and controls are imposed on all branches of a government through checks and balances. This is done by giving each branch the right to change or void certain things that the other branches do. • The Commander-in-Chief of the Army is the President of the United States. • The President can dictate the strategy and orders of the military. Checks and Balances: The Executive Branch • The President and his Cabinet • The President can make treaties with other nations • The President carries out laws • The President can veto bills passed by Congress if he does not believe that they are correct • The President appoints judges in the Judicial Branch for a life term • The President writes the national budget • The President can refuse to enforce a law on the nation (Nov 2-6 Constitution and Bill of Rights- Mrs. Moreno, n.d.) Checks and Balances: The Legislative Branch • Consists of Congress (House of Representatives and the Senate) • Congress creates laws • Congress can refuse to pass bills • Congress can overturn a veto on a bill done by the President with a two-thirds vote • Congress can refuse to ratify treaties • Congress can refuse to approve a Presidential appointment • Congress can impeach or fire a judge or the President for misconduct • Congress approves treaties and budgets • Congress approves the President’s choices for offices (Nguyen, 2011) Checks and Balances: The Judicial Branch • The Judicial Branch is led by the Supreme Court • The Judicial Branch interprets (understands) laws • The Judicial Branch has the right to state laws are unconstitutional • The Judicial Branch has the right to say if decisions made by the President are unconstitutional • Members of the Judicial Branch hold their office for life Federalism Federalism is when power is split by the federal, state, and local governments. Federal and state governments share the power to: • Create taxes • Borrow money • Create laws • Create court systems Federalism: The Federal Government The Federal Government can: • Declare war • Control trade • Create post offices and federal government offices • Create money Federalism: The State Government Governments of states can: • Create schools • Control trade with other states • Create laws for the state • Creates marriage and divorce laws (Federalism Examples for Kids, n.d.) Judicial Review • Judicial review was created to make sure that laws, decisions, or actions by the other branches of the government (or lower courts) were constitutional (legal) • The Supreme Court can determine if laws, judicial decisions, and decisions made by the government are constitutional • Judicial review was created in the early 1800’s under the case of Marbury v. Madison Judicial Review Judicial review allows for state laws and actions to be overridden by the Supreme Court Topics that are brought up in front of the Supreme Court include: • • • • • • Executive actions/orders Regulations by government agencies Actions or laws made by Congress Actions or laws made by State Actions or laws made by local government Judicial errors Judicial Review Cases that used Judicial Review • Ladue v. Gilleo, 1994 • Harper v. Virginia Board of Elections, 1966 • Miranda v. Arizona, 1966 • Weeks v. United States, 1914 • United States v. Nixon, 1974 • Plessey v. Ferguson, 1869 (Judicial Branch of Government for Kids, n.d.) Limited Government • The first and basic principle of the Constitution is limited government • The first three words of the Preamble talk about limited government • The first three words of the Preamble state that the government only exists because the people of the United States want it to exist (“We the people”) • The federal government does not have any God-given powers • The federal government only has power because the people choose for it to have power • The federal government does not have all the power • The federal government cannot do anything unless the people allow for the government to do it Limited Government • Limited government is seen throughout the Constitution • The Constitution lists items that the government cannot do (Three Branches of Government (for kids), 2012) Limited Government • Popular sovereignty influenced the idea of limited government • The government has authority only under the people of the United States • The government only has what powers the people choose to give to it • The Constitution states what powers the federal government has and does not have (Ancient Inventions for Kids, n.d.) Popular Sovereignty • Popular sovereignty means that the federal government was made by the people • Popular means representing to benefit the people of the United States • The United States and its people are sovereign • Since the United States and its people are sovereign, it means that we control our own government • The people have the power in the United States • The federal government is controlled by the will of the people (Power to the People, n.d.) Popular Sovereignty • John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau created the idea of popular sovereignty • Benjamin Franklin (one of the founding fathers) developed the concept in America (Popular Sovereignty, n.d.) Popular Sovereignty • Popular sovereignty was used as the foundation for the United States’ breakaway from Great Britain • The Declaration of Independence was written by Thomas Jefferson • The Declaration of Independence rid America of British rule and created the American government • The Declaration of Independence was influenced by popular sovereignty • The Declaration of Independence declares that, “All men are equal and have unalienable rights such as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” (Declaration of Independence, n.d.) References • 7 Principles of the Constitution. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://www.government-and-constitution.org/us-constitution/7-principles-of-theconstitution.htm • Ancient Inventions for Kids. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://ancienthistory.mrdonn.org/inventions.html • Constitution: Travel Back in Time. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://www.congressforkids.net/Constitution_checksandbalances.htm • Constitutional Topic: Separation of Powers - The U.S. Constitution Online. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://usconstitution.net/consttop_sepp.html • Declaration of Independence. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://www.politicususa.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/declaration-ofindependence.jpg • Federalism Examples for Kids. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://pixshark.com/federalism-examples-for-kids.htm References • Illustration of Objectives. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://www.dreamstime.com/stock-illustration-objectives-play-cubes-computer-generatedimage-image44714580 • Judicial Branch of Government for Kids. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://government.mrdonn.org/judicialbranch.html • Judicial Review. (2005). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Judicial_review • Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia Federalism. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://encyclopedia.kids.net.au/page/fe/Federalism • Nguyen, T. (2011). AP Gov Blog. Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://tomsapgovblog.blogspot.com/2011/10/similemetaphor-for-seperation-of-powers.html • Nov 2-6 Constitution and Bill of Rights - Mrs. Moreno. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://sites.google.com/a/springisd.org/mrs-moreno-5th-grade/history/nov-2-6constitution-and-bill-of-rights References • Popular Sovereignty. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://www.sliderbase.com/images/referats/333b/(9).PNG • Popular Sovereignty Definition for Kids. (2016). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://healthresearchfunding.org/popular-sovereignty-definition-for-kids/ • Power to the People. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from https://cdn.thinglink.me/api/image/592077624885379073/1240/10/scaletowidth • Separation of Powers. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Separation_of_powers • Three Branches of Government (for kids). (2012). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://generationnation.org/index.php/learn/entry/three-branches-ofgovernment-for-kids • U.S. Government for Kids. (n.d.). Retrieved May 2, 2018, from http://mrnussbaum.com/government/ Constitution Day Presentation Sabrina Charafeddine Grand Canyon University: POS 500 July 12, 2017 “We the people of the fourth grade…” Today we will learn about the core tenets of the United States Constitution: • Separation of powers • Checks and balances • Federalism • Judicial review • Limited government • Popular sovereignty Separation of powers • Each branch of government is separate and has unique powers that other branches of government cannot interfere with. • The three branches of government are the executive (carries out laws), legislative (makes the laws), and judicial branches (the courts that decide if the law has been broken). • The legislative branch is the only branch allowed to declare war. Separation of powers • The President of the U.S. is the Commander-in-chief of the a ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

CONSTITUTION
DAY
Student’s name:
POS-500
Instructor’s name:
Date of Submission:

C onstitution Day
■ The constitution is a document containing the fundamental laws and
principles by which the United States is governed.
■ Grade level –Seventh(7) Grade.
■ Audience- Parents

■ Core tenets of the U.S constitution
1. Checks and balances
2. Federalism
3. Judicial review
4. Limited government
5. Popular sovereignty
6. Separation of powers

Checks and balances
■ Ensures balance in every branch of the government (Fisher, 2003).
■ It divides the powers between the three branches:
– Legislative
– Executive
– Judicial
■ Each branch exercises power that the two others can check.
■ Executive branch checks the judicial branch through appointments.

Checks and Balances: Executive Branch
■ Headed by the president.
■ Commander-in-chief of the armed forces.
■ Implements and enforces laws (Patrick, Pious & Ritchie, 2001).

■ The cabinet is the advisory body with 15 executive members.
■ Executive members are appointed by the president.
■ The senate confirms the appointment.

Checks and Balances: Legislative
Branch
■ The Congress: Senate and House of Representatives.
■ The legislative makes laws(Patrick et al., 2001).
■ The Congress votes in the laws.
■ The Senators are 100, two from each State.
■ Senators are elected to serve a six-year term.
■ The Senate confirms the president’s nominations.

■ The House of Representatives has 435 members.
■ Representatives are elected to serve a two-year term.

Checks and Balances: Judicial Branch
■ Oversees the Court System.
■ Led by the Supreme Court.
■ Elaborates on the meaning of constitution.

■ Explains laws passed by the Congress.
■ Has nine judges: One chief justice and eight associate judges.
■ The judges are appointed by the executive, president.
■ The appointments are approved by the legislature, Congress.

Checks and Balances Cont’d

Federalism
■ Sharing of power between the national and state governments.
■ In U.S the national government holds significant powers.
■ The state and local governments also hold significant power.
Dual federalism
■ Federal and state governments are co-equals, each independent.
cooperative federalism
■ National government is supreme over the states.

■ Types of powers are granted (federal), reserved (state) and concurrent
(both).

...

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Goes above and beyond expectations !

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