Community Mapping

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Assignment Description

Each student will engage at least six community residents in a conversation about their own individual strengths, associations, and institutional connections and also to learn about the strengths, assets, opportunities, and challenges the community member perceives in the community. (Discussion and guidelines for these Learning Conversations are included in the readings for Week Six). In addition to having conversations with residents of the community, students will also analyze census data, and create an asset map of their communities identifying the associations and institutions present within their communities.

This assignment will culminate into a final product:

Final Product: Each student will write up an analysis of the community based on their conversations with community residents, census data analysis, and discovery of community associations and institutions.

The written analysis will include the following sections:

  • Overview of the community
  • Brief summary of conversations with community residents
  • Asset map
  • Short narrative description of the asset map
  • Power analysis

The written analysis will also include recommendations for one community project that would build on the strengths and assets identified, take advantage of the opportunities, and address one or more of the challenges learned through the course of the project. The paper will also describe the initial steps needed to begin implementing the community project.

This week work on:

  • Writing history of community
  • Demographics of community and census analysis

Required Readings • • • • • • • Census website: (Review the census webpage, and one of the data sources collected by the census.) Kirst-Ashman, K., & Hull, G. (2015). Generalist practice with organizations and communities (6th ed.). Stanford: CT: Cengage Learning. o Chapter 7. Kretzman, J., & McKnight, J. (1993). Building communities from the inside out. Chicago, IL: ACTA Publications. o Introduction, p. 1-10, o Chapter 1, p. 12-106; o Chapter. 2, p. 109-170; o Chapter. 3, 171-272. Learning Conversation Guidelines McKnight, J. (1997). A 21st century map for healthy communities and families. Families in Society, 78(2), 117-127. Rothman, J. (1995). Approaches to community intervention and three modes of intervention. In Rothman, J., et. al., (Eds.) (pp. 26-63). Strategies of Community Intervention. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Speer, P., Ontkush, M., Schmitt, B., Raman, P. Jackson, C., Rengert, K., & Peterson, N. (2003). The Intentional Exercise of Power: Community Organizing in Camden, New Jersey. Journal of Community Applied Social Psychology, 13, 399-408. Additional Resources • • 2010 Census Data Visualization: Interactive Population Map Asset-Based Community Development Institute (ABCD)
Daughtery/ 606 online/Community Analysis CUA THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA National Catholic School of Social Service Washington, DC 20064 SSS 606 – Generalist Social Work Practice with Groups, Organizations, and Communities 2015 Community Analysis: Asset-Based Community Development Assignment Purpose The purpose of this assignment is for foundation year social work students to develop an approach to understanding and analyzing communities by first recognizing the strengths and assets of community residents, including the capacities of residents themselves and the associations and institutions to which they are connected. Therefore, a guiding principle for this project is that all communities and their residents have strengths, assets, and resources. This does not mean that communities do not have needs. All communities have needs. However, it means that any efforts designed to build capacity and support for communities should first look at the existing strengths and resources within the communities and build upon those. Assignment Description Each student will engage at least six community residents in a conversation about their own individual strengths, associations, and institutional connections and also to learn about the strengths, assets, opportunities, and challenges the community member perceives in the community. (Discussion and guidelines for these Learning Conversations are included in the reading for Week Six). In addition to having conversations with residents of the community, students will also analyze census data, and create an asset map of their communities identifying the associations and institutions present within their communities. This assignment will culminate into a final products:  Final Product: Each student will write up an analysis of the community based on their conversations with community residents, census data analysis, and discovery of community associations and institutions. The written analysis will include an overview of the community, a brief summary of conversations with community residents, an asset map, a short narrative description of the asset map, and a power analysis. The written analysis will also include recommendations for one community project that would build on the strengths and assets identified, take advantage of the opportunities, and 1 address one or more of the challenges learned through the course of the project. The paper will also describe the initial steps needed to begin implementing the community project. Recommended Written Assignment Format I. Introduction (one paragraph) (10 points)    II. Overview of Community1 (2 pages) (25 points)    III. General background/history of community members in community Strengths, associations, and institutions connected to community members Strengths, assets, opportunities, and challenges of community identified by community member Power Analysis: Discuss the three dimensions of power in the context of the community (1/2 page) (10 points). For example:    V. History of community Demographics of community and census analysis Narrative description of asset map2 which students will attach to the paper as an Appendix. Summary of Conversations with Community Residents (1 1/2 pages) (25 points)    IV. The community’s name (and if that name differs from the name residents give the community). The geographical boundaries of the community The framework for the paper Visible Dimensions: How are decisions made in/for/with the community? Who is represented in those decision-making bodies? What kinds of power do they represent? Who does not appear to have a voice in decisions affecting the community? Hidden Power: How do community groups decide what issues to tackle in their own communities? How are people engaged in making decisions about the community or deciding what issues are important for the community to discuss? Are there any barriers to being engaged in that process? Invisible Power: Who shapes the meaning for the community? Who tells the community’s story, how do they tell that story? Recommendation for One Community Projects Based on Strengths, Assets, and Opportunities found in community and mentioned by community members, including next steps toward achieving it. (1/2 page) (20 points) 1 May want to refer Ohmer & DeMasi (2009), chapters 6 and 9 for categories to include in descriptive overview of community. 2 See p. 319 of Kirst-Ashman and Hull (2015) for example of format for the asset map. 2 Appendix:  Asset Map (10 points) All papers must be 7 pages, using APA format. 3

Tutor Answer

chriss200
School: Purdue University

Attached.

Running Head: Asset-Based Community Development

Asset-Based Community Development
Student’s name:
Course name:
Instructor’s name:
Date of submission:

1

Asset-Based Community Development

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Introduction

A group of people that share particular values, interests, services, institutions or
geographic boundaries is referred to as a community (Jones, 1979). Richmond Community is the
capital of Commonwealth Virginia. All residents refer to the community as Richmond.
Richmond covers a land area of 62.5 square miles. Richmond is located at the fall line of James
River, 158 kilometres south of Washington, D.C, 71 kilometres West of Williamsburg, and 106
kilometres east of Charlottesville. Richmond is surrounded by Chesterfield and Henrico
Counties. Richmond is geographically bordered by various suburbs, they include Glen Allen to
the north and west and the south is Chesterfield, Midlothian to the Southwest, Southeast is
Varina, and Short Pump to the West (Richmond, n.d). All communities have strengths, assets,
resources and needs. This paper analyzes Richmond community based on online research data
and interview information to identify its history, demographics, individual strengths,
opportunities and challenges. It provides a developed asset map for the community detailing
associations and its institutions. It offers recommendations based on the strengths, assets and
opportunities of the community.
Overview of Community
History of the Community
During the civil war, the area served as the capital of Confederate States of America. In
1607, after Captain Christopher Newport led English explorers is travelling from Jamestown up
Powhatan River decided to settle in the area. Powhatan River was later named James River. The
men targeted to settle at the Falls of James River. They later in 1611, sailed up and settled below
the Falls of James River in a place called Henricus. In 1622, the Indian attacked and destroyed

Asset-Based Community Development

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English settlements in the region except for the Jamestown over the death of Pocahontas and
chief Powhatan in 1617 and 1618 respectively. More than four hundred white settlers were killed
in 1644. The Indians were forced to sign a treaty and gave the land to the English people. Many
settlers were attracted by the construction of Fort Charles. In 1737, Colonel William Byrd II
inherited the land on both sides of the river from his father Richmond and named the place
Richmond. William Byrd’s friend, William Mayo developed Richmond’s map in 1741. In 1742
when Richmond was chartered as a town, the neighborhoods of Church Hill, Shockoe Slip and
Shockoe Bottom. At that time it h...

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