american History to 1877: Final Exam with Timed and Open Book. Answer Each Question 250 Words

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Need you to take timed final exam. Answer each question 250 words. I attend American Military University. My User Name is: 5562183. My Password is: Royals1964!!. Course HIST101. I have Highlighted in yellow the instruction for the final exam. Need to be completed by Jul 1. See attachment.

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School of Arts and Humanities HIST101 American History before 1877 Credit Hours: 3 Length of Course: 8 Weeks Prerequisite: None Table of Contents Instructor Information Evaluation Procedures Course Description Grading Scale Course Scope Course Outline Course Objectives Policies Course Delivery Method Academic Services Course Resources Select Bibliography Instructor Information See the “Syllabus” tab in your online classroom. Table of Contents Course Description (Catalog) This course is a survey of United States history from the earliest European settlements in North America through the end of Reconstruction and e emphasizes our nation's political, economic, and social development, the evolution of its institutions, and the causes and consequences of its principal wars. Table of Contents Course Scope This course will examine the historical evolution of the United States from its colonial period to the end of the Reconstruction. It is important to understand that the events taking place in the United States did not occur in a vacuum. As such, a major focus of this course will entail placing American history in the large r context of western civilization. Hence, a constant emphasis is on the “big picture.” The intent is to give the student not only a firm grasp of American history but also a solid understanding of why these events were, and still are, important. The course will examine these developments chronologically (at least largely) with particular emphasis placed upon foreign and domestic political, economic and military policies, as well as the evolution of industry and society. Table of Contents Course Objectives After successfully completing this course, you will be able to CO1: Examine the historical development of the United States since the colonial period including the major figures in American history and their significance. CO2: Evaluate the major goals of the various presidential administrations. CO3: Analyze internal/external forces that altered the nation from independence to 1877. C04: Describe major economic cycles and causes of economic change, along with key points in the evolution of American industry and society. CO5: Develop your skills in analytical thinking and historical writing. Table of Contents Course Delivery Method This course delivered via distance learning will enable students to complete academic work in a flexible manner, completely online. Course materials and access to an online learning management system will be made available to each student. Online assignments are due by Sunday evening of the week as noted and include Forum questions (accomplished in groups through a threaded forum), examination, and individual assignments submitted for review by the Faculty Member). Assigned faculty will support the students throughout this eight-week course. Table of Contents Course Resources Required Course Textbook Corbett, P. Scott, Volker Janssen, John M. Lund, Todd J. Pfannestiel, Paul S. Vickery, and Sylvie Waskiewicz. U.S. History. PDF e-book. Houston: Rice University OpenStax, 2017. NOTE: Links to the readings for this textbook are located in each Week’s forum. You may also download a copy for free via the OPEN WEB at http://cnx.org/content/col11740/latest/. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/bookstore for more information. Style Guide Resources: APUS library guide to APA Style: https://www.apus.edu/apus-library/resourcesservices/Writing/writing-center/apa-style-guide-info.html. APUS library guide to MLA Style: https://www.apus.edu/apus-library/resourcesservices/Writing/writing-center/mla-style-guide-info.html. APUS library guide to the Chicago Manual of Style, Notes/Bibliography format: https://www.apus.edu/apus-library/resources-services/Writing/writing-center/chicago-style-infocontinued.html. Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.), Notes/Bibliography “Quick Guide” to citation formatting: http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org.ezproxy2.apus.edu/tools_citationguide/citation-guide-1.html. Table of Contents Chicago/Turabian Manuals The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th ed. Chapter 14 “Notes and Bibliography.” Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017. http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org.ezproxy2.apus.edu /book/ed17/part3/ch14/toc.html. Turabian, Kate L. A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations: Chicago Style for Students and Researchers. 8th Edition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013. (Not available online. Purchase Optional). Web Resources: In addition to the required course text, a number of excellent public domain academic archives and peer-reviewed materials are available via links found at the HIST101 Course Guide. Please abide by the university’s academic honesty policy when using Internet sources as well. Note web site addresses are subject to change. Table of Contents Evaluation Procedures Forum Assignments: Throughout the course you will answer questions in the Forums, respond to the postings of your classmates, and answer follow-up questions that I will post in the Forum. Directions for the Forum assignments are located within the classroom and an explanation of the exact expectations can be found in the “Forum Guidance and Requirements” document within the Week 1 Assignment lesson. Additionally, there are two debate forums. At the beginning of the session you will be divided into two groups. For each of the debates, you will need to contribute an initial response to the debate, and then respond to three of your peers from the “opposing team” (as an academic debate). Written Assignments: During the course you will have two writing assignments. The first requires you to visit the National Archives Experience site. The second is a short research paper, three-to-five pages in length. An explanation of the exact expectations are posted in the classroom assignments section. Written Assignment Follow-Up Questions: During the course, about ten days after the written assignment is due, you will have the opportunity to post your answer to one of the questions that I ask while grading your paper. A special forum is in the class during Week Eight for this purpose. Table of Contents Exams: There is a timed, open-book, open-notes, and non-proctored final exam that you must complete for 25% of all course points during Week Eight. Grade Instruments Weekly Forums (Weeks 1 through 8: See gradebook with the class for exact breakdown of points.) Points 50 National Archives, Assignment 1 10 Written Assignment 2 10 Written Assignment 2 Follow-Up Question Final Exam 5 25 Total 100 Table of Contents Grading and Course Outline Please see the Student Handbook to reference the University’s grading scale. Table of Contents Course Overview and Assignments by Week, follows: Week 1 2 Topic Discovery and Settlement British Colonies Learning Objectives CO1: Examine the historical development of the United States since the colonial period including the major figures in American history and their significance. CO3: Analyze internal/external forces that altered the nation from independence to 1877. C04: Describe major economic cycles and causes of economic change, along with key points in the evolution of American industry and society. Readings Read the syllabus. Review all policies and the lecture in Lessons section. Text Readings U.S. History: Chapters 1, 2, and 3 Assignments Forum 1.1 and Forum 1.2 Read the lecture in the Lessons section. Text Readings U.S. History: Chapters 4 and 5 Forum 2 Table of Contents Week 3 4 5 6 Topic Learning Objectives War and a New Republic CO1: Examine the historical development of the United States since the colonial period including the major figures in American history and their significance. CO3: Analyze internal/external forces that altered the nation from independence to 1877. Revolution and Transformations CO2: Evaluate the major goals of the various presidential administrations. CO3: Analyze internal/external forces that altered the nation from independence to 1877. CO5: Develop your skills in analytical thinking and historical writing. Religious Reform and Slavery in the South CO4: Describe major economic cycles and causes of economic change, along with key points in the evolution of American industry and society. The Civil War CO1: Examine the historical development of the United States since the colonial period including the major figures in American history and their significance. CO2: Evaluate the major goals of the various presidential administrations. CO4: Describe major economic cycles and causes of economic change, along with the key points in the evolution of American industry and society. CO5: Develop your skills in analytical thinking and historical writing. Readings Read the lecture in the Lessons section. Text Readings U.S. History: Chapters 6 and 7 Read the lecture in the Lessons section. Text Readings U.S. History: Chapters 8, 9, and 10 Read the lecture in the Lessons section. Text Readings U.S. History: Chaps. 11, 12, and 13 Read the lecture in the Lessons section. Text Readings U.S. History: Chapters 14 and 15 Assignments Forum: Debate, Week 2 forum follow-up and National Archives Assignment due Forum 4 and National Archives assignment feedback forum Forum 5 and Week 4 forum follow-up Forum: Debate, Week 5 forum follow-up, and Writing Assignment #2 due Table of Contents Week 7 Topic Learning Objectives Reconstruction CO1: Examine the historical development of the United States since the colonial period including the major figures in American history and their significance. CO2: Evaluate the major goals of the various presidential administrations. Readings Assignments Read the lecture in the Lessons section. Forum 7 Text Readings U.S. History: Chapter 16 Read the lecture in the Lessons section. 8 Final Exam Week Review all objectives. Forum 8, Week 7 forum follow-up, Assignment #2 Follow-up and Final Exam Review the entire textbook, as required, to prepare for the final exam. Table of Contents Policies Please see the Student Handbook to reference all University policies. Quick links to frequently asked question about policies are listed below. Drop/Withdrawal Policy Plagiarism Policy Extension Process and Policy Disability Accommodations Writing Expectations: Within the class are several documents that explain the history program’s expectations. These documents are the “Forum Guidance and Requirements,” “Written Assignment Guidance,” and “Written Assignment Rubric.” Citation and Reference Style: History and Military History students should become familiar with the Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) format for citations and the bibliography. The CMS is the standard format for historians. As such, it is our responsibility to ensure that you use this format so that you become comfortable with it during your undergraduate years. Non-history majors may use APA or MLA as the citation and reference style used in written work submitted for this course. Late Assignments Students are expected to submit classroom assignments by the posted due date and to complete the course according to the published class schedule. As adults, students, and working professionals, I understand you must manage competing demands on your time. Should you need additional time to complete an assignment, please contact me before the due date so we can discuss the situation and determine an acceptable resolution. Work posted or submitted after the assignment due date will be reduced by 10% of the potential total score possible for each day late up to a total of five days, including forum posts/replies, quizzes, and assignments. Beginning on the sixth day late through the end of the course, late work, including forum posts/replies, quizzes, and assignments, will be accepted with a grade reduction of 50% of the potential total score earned. Table of Contents Netiquette Online universities promote the advancement of knowledge through positive and constructive debate – both inside and outside the classroom. Forums on the Internet, however, can occasionally degenerate into needless insults and “flaming.” Such activity and the loss of good manners are not acceptable in a university setting – basic academic rules of good behavior and proper “Netiquette” must persist. Remember that you are in a place for the rewards and excitement of learning which does not include descent to personal attacks or student attempts to stifle the Forum of others. • • Technology Limitations: While you should feel free to explore the full-range of creative composition in your formal papers, keep e-mail layouts simple. The Sakai classroom may not fully support MIME or HTML encoded messages, which means that bold face, italics, underlining, and a variety of color-coding or other visual effects will not translate in your email messages. Humor Note: Despite the best of intentions, jokes and especially satire can easily get lost or taken seriously. If you feel the need for humor, you may wish to add “emoticons” to help alert your readers: ;-), : ), ☺ Disclaimer Statement Course content may vary from the outline to meet the needs of this particular group. Table of Contents Online Library The Online Library is available to enrolled students and faculty from inside the electronic campus. This is your starting point for access to online books, subscription periodicals, and web resources designed to support your classes and generally not available through search engines on the open web. In addition, the Online Library provides access to special learning resources that the University has contracted to assist with your studies. Questions can be directed to librarian@apus.edu. • • • • Charles Town Library and Inter Library Loan: The University maintains a special library with a limited number of supporting volumes, collection of our professors’ publication, and services to search and borrow research books and articles from other libraries. Electronic Books: You can use the online library to uncover and download over 50,000 titles, which have been scanned and made available in electronic format. Electronic Journals: The University provides access to over 12,000 journals, which are available in electronic form and only through limited subscription services. Tutor.com: AMU and APU Civilian & Coast Guard students are eligible for 10 free hours of tutoring provided by APUS. Tutor.com connects you with a professional tutor online 24/7 to provide help with assignments, studying, test prep, resume writing, and more. Tutor.com is tutoring the way it was meant to be. You get expert tutoring whenever you need help, and you work one-to-one with your tutor in your online classroom on your specific problem until it is done. Request a Library Guide for your course (http://apus.libguides.com/index.php) The AMU/APU Library Guides provide access to collections of trusted sites on the Open Web and licensed resources on the Deep Web. The following are specially tailored for academic research at APUS: • • Program Portals contain topical and methodological resources to help launch general research in the degree program. To locate, search by department name, or navigate by school. Course Lib-Guides narrow the focus to relevant resources for the corresponding course. To locate, search by class code (e.g., SOCI111), or class name. If a guide you need is not available yet, please email the APUS Library: librarian@apus.edu. Table of Contents Turnitin.com It is required assignments be submitted to Turnitin.com. Turnitin.com will analyze a paper and report instances of potential plagiarism for the student to edit before submitting it for a grade. In some cases professors may require students to use Turnitin.com. Typically the course professor will establish a Turnitin.com access code for his/her classes. If the code has not been established, those who wish to use Turnitin.com may ask their professor to establish the code. Special Note to Faculty: Please be certain to provide accurate directions and to set up the functionality appropriately. Table of Contents Select Bibliography For bibliography and research sources, please reference your APUS History 101 Web Course Guide at: http://apus.libguides.com/friendly.php?action=82&s=HIST101. Table of Contents ...
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henryprofessor
School: UC Berkeley

Hi,I completed the four questions and submitted them already.check
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Running head: FINAL EXAM

1

Final Exam
Name
Institution

FINAL EXAM

2
Final Exam

1. What made Native American peoples vulnerable to conquest by European
adventurers?
There are several reasons why the Native Americans were vulnerable to conquest and one
of them is the lack of equipment to handle the European invaders. While the European invaders
were equipped to explore and conquer the land, the Native Americans were struggling with
issues such as famine, diseases, and war. Therefore, they were not ready for the invasion, which
destabilized them and led to their conquering.
Furthermore, the economic, political, and military organization of the European invaders
was superior to the Native Americans'. According to Miller (2006), the Native American
communities were always in conflict with each other on the tribe level mainly due to competition
for natural resources that nourished them. An example of the conflicts is the Aztecs who were in
constant conflict with each other regarding territorial rights and sacrificing captives.
Miller (2006) observes that Hernan Cortes utilized the weakness to form alliance with opposing
tribes thus conquering their enemies easily. The lack of a cohesive government unit, therefore,
weakened their political systems and military defense leading to internal divisions which were
strategic for the European conquerors.
Additionally, the level of technological development of the Native Americans also led to
their conquest by the Europeans. At the time of the Eu...

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