can you help with Math assignments ?

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timer Asked: Jun 26th, 2018
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Hello , I need help with the math assignments , as you know its college math ,, these are exercised and need help with …they are located the end of each chapter ,

ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Required Textbooks: 1. Hacker, Diana and Nancy Sommers. A Writer's Reference. 7th ed. Boston: Bedford/ St.Martin's, 2011. Print. ISBN-13: 978-0-312-60143-0. An e-Book version of this text is also available from Bedford/St. Martin's for half the price of the hard copy. Visit the publisher’s website. 2. Barnet, Sylvan and Hugo Bedau. From Critical Thinking to Argument: A Portable Guide. 4th ed. Boston: Bedford / St. Martin’s, 2014. Print. ISBN-13: 978-1-4576-4995-0. Optional Resources: Additional writing resources from the publisher of our textbooks: http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/rewriting2e Re: Writing 3. Recommended Materials: A USB flash drive is recommended to store an additional copy of all your work. Access to a collegiate dictionary and thesaurus. Maybe upload a free scanner application to your device for easy submission of the brainstorming activity. CATALOG DESCRIPTION: This course emphasizes source-based writing designed to develop critical reading, thinking, and writing. A series of written assignments, including a fully documented paper, are required. CURRICULAR RELATIONSHIPS: Communication Arts II satisfies 3 hours of the Category II requirement in General Studies: “Fluency in Oral and Written Communication.” The course is designed to refine writing, reading, thinking and speaking skills that will carry over into any discipline the student may choose to follow. English 102 is intended to improve the student’s skills in preparing assignments based on written and other public sources. However, because the success of documented writing and informed speaking depends largely on the student’s ability to weigh evidence and arguments, the course will contain a large component in critical reading, thinking, and evaluation. Effective writing is fundamental to student learning and success in every discipline. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: Students will demonstrate the following: 1. ability to write, read, and think from an informed and critical perspective; 2. facility in research methods, including ability to appraise sources, synthesize information into a well-developed composition; and Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 4 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II 3. skills in written argumentation, including the ability to defend one’s position in written responses. CONTENT OUTLINE: 1. Documented research a. Library orientation b. Informed writing (source-based writing) 2. Critical writing a. The logical structure of arguments b. Persuasive techniques c. Style and argument 3. Critical reading (analysis of expository and argumentative essays) COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Writing Assignments: The student will produce a series of argumentative papers and oral presentations of varying length and difficulty. The student will also write a paper that will require more extensive documentation. All papers requiring the use of sources must be correctly documented using MLA format. Students will be required to submit assignments totaling 4,500-6,000 words. All work submitted for this course must be authentic and original (See the Code of Conduct policy in the General Instructions). The student may receive a failing grade for the course if plagiarized work is submitted. The instructor uses the Turn It In website (turnitin.com), a plagiarism detection tool. Final Exam: The final exam must be requested from Extended Studies using the Examination Request form provided in your course materials. You will provide the name and address of a proctor or testing center, who will supervise the exam. This process takes some time, so plan ahead. See “Exam Review” in the Appendix. All three parts are open book. The exam must be completed in the three hours allowed. The final exam will consist of three parts: Part One is to write five thesis statements for the prompts provided. Part Two is to create accurate in-text citations for the prompts provided. Part Three is to edit and revise a Works Cited page using standard MLA style as described in the Writer’s Reference handbook. Students must complete all 11/eleven assignments and the exam to pass the course. Note: many colleges, universities, and scholarship programs will not accept a grade below 75% for transfer. Aim for a solid 75% / “C” grade or better. See “Computing your English 102 Score” appendix – very good assignment list. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 5 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II GRADE DISTRIBUTION AND SCALE: In alignment with ASU academic policies, no D may apply to a major or minor field. Grade Distribution: Assignments 1 – 9 Assignments 10 – 11 (draft and final project) Final Exam Total 100 points each 200 points each 400 points 900 points 400 points 400 points 1700 points Grade Scale: 1530 – 1700 points 1360 – 1529 points 1190 – 1359 points 1020 – 1189 points Less than 1020 points 90-100% 80-89% 70-79% 60-69% 59% and below A B C D F ADA STATEMENT Adams State University complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Adams State University is committed to achieving equal educational opportunities, providing students with documented disabilities access to university programs. In order for a course to be equally accessible to all students, different accommodations or adjustments may need to be implemented. The Office of Disability Services (ODS) is located in Richardson Hall, Suite 3-100, by mail at 208 Edgemont Blvd., Suite 3-100, Alamosa, CO 81101, by email at odsd@adams.edu, or by calling 719-587-7746. They are your primary resource on campus to discuss the qualifying disability, help you develop an accessibility plan, and achieve success in your courses. Please communicate with them as early as possible; this can be in person, via email, or by phone. The Disability Services Coordinator shall either provide you letters to give to your professors for accommodations or email these letters out to you and your professors. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY In accordance with Academic Policy 100-03-01, Adams State University, to preserve academic integrity, does not tolerate academic dishonesty (misconduct). Every student is required to practice and adhere to the principle of ACADEMIC INTEGRITY while undertaking studies at Adams State University. Students and faculty at Adams State University value academic honesty as a virtue essential to the academic process. Cheating, plagiarism, unauthorized possession or disposition of academic materials, or the falsification or fabrication of one’s academic work will not be tolerated. Any offense may result in a zero for the exam, lesson, or exercise in question and may result in failure of the course. Please refer to the ASU Extended Studies Academic Integrity website for Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 6 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II more information including the student handbook: Academic Integrity at Adams State University. All written work is subject to plagiarism detection software review. STUDENT IDENTITY VERIFICATION: Adams State University utilizes a variety of methods to verify the identity of students enrolled in courses, including but not limited to: secure logins and pass codes, proctored exams, security questions, and other technologies and practices that are effective in verifying student identity. Some of these methods may incur an extra cost to students; associated costs will be outlined in the course syllabus, other University documents, and on the University website. Adams State University reserves the right to request additional government-issued documentation of identity from students for the purpose of ensuring that the person enrolled in the course is the person completing assignments, exams, and all other course requirements. Any student engaged in incidents of student identity fraud may face reprimand, disciplinary warning, a lowered or failing grade(s), and/or probation, or suspension from the course, academic program or University, or expulsion from the University. EXAMINATIONS: Please refer to the Guidelines for Proctored Exams and submit your Exam Request Form three weeks BEFORE you plan to take the exam. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 7 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II COURSE INSTRUCTIONS Note: In an independent study course, the student self-paces. Course completion has an 8 week minimum (with at least 6 weeks of working time between student’s first contact and completion) and a one year maximum. The textbooks and the companion websites are very much the teacher in the independent study course. Choosing to skip the reading selections is like choosing to skip class. The English 102 course textbooks and Study Guide explain the requirements for each writing assignment, in detail. Read and follow the assignment directions very carefully. The textbook readings will further explain the relationship between various writing techniques, skills, and strategies. I suggest first skimming the reading material, then diving into a more studied reading and note-taking session. Enrollment in English 102 assumes basic writing skills, so I have not assigned any grammar study. However, the handbook will assist you with many composition questions, so I recommend keeping it handy. All rules of Academic Standard English apply to your course assignments. Throughout the course, the student will draft, revise and edit various writing tasks before submitting. The shorter writings average 2 pages in length. The culminating project will be a formal essay, 7-9 pages of text, on a self-selected, arguable topic from the student’s major or minor, using a source-based discussion. The student may send the assignments one or two at a time. Because each assignment builds on previous knowledge, it is important that the student complete the assignments in order, and read instructor comments on returned assignments. ASSIGNMENT PROCEDURE: Complete the topic reading to gain knowledge of the writing skill being assigned. Carefully read the text and write the assignment. After you’ve completed an assignment, send it to the instructor via land mail, an attachment in email, or fax. The instructor will acknowledge receipt of the assignment as soon as possible. The instructor will score and comment upon the writing assignment within the 10 days allotted, then return the comments to the student. Students may submit work as a document attached to an email. (NOT directly in email). Part of your assessment is on formatting according to MLA structure. Because email does not hold any of your formatting commands, it does not work for our purposes. Save work as a word document (.rtf / Rich Text Format is the most universally accepted) and attach the file to an e-mail message. Name your assignment files using both your names and some indication of the assignment and course as part of the attached file name. For example: Bob_Smith_Eng 102_#4 Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 9 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Likewise, all emails should use your registration name and English 101 or 102 in the subject line. The same pattern as the filename works fine: Bob_Smith_Eng 101_#4 Send email to: enovotny@adams.edu Fax: be sure to provide a return fax number. You must label your work with instructor name: Ellen Novotny. Department of English, Theatre, and Communication: 719-587-8145. The slower, but equally dependable method is to communicate via land mail. Ellen Novotny Adams State University Department of English, Theatre, and Communication – Suite 3070 208 Edgemont Blvd. Alamosa, CO 81101 Please keep in mind, that this entire process takes time. Plan accordingly All work submitted for this course must be authentic and original (See the Code of Conduct policy in the General Instructions). The student may receive a failing grade for the course if plagiarized work is submitted. The instructor uses the Turn It In website (turnitin.com), a plagiarism detection tool Students must complete all 11/eleven assignments and a proctored final exam to pass the course. The first assignments will receive extensive instructor comments. The later assignments will involve continued instructor guidance, but to a lesser degree as the expectations increase for the student to demonstrate improved skills. Given this, it is important to open up returned assignments, read instructor comments, and learn from the instruction provided. All assignments must use MLA format. Submit one or two assignments at a time and wait for instructor comments before submitting more. The point of my making comments is for you to learn, and improve your writing skills. The assessment becomes more and more rigorous with each assignment because you are expected to demonstrate improved skills. Do not dump all the assignments at once. FINAL EXAM: The final exam must be requested from Extended Studies using the Examination Request form provided in your course materials. You will provide the name and address of a proctor or testing center, who will supervise the exam. This process takes some time, so plan ahead. See “Exam Review” in the Appendix. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 10 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II A FEW NOTES ABOUT PROCESS: Students may submit work as a word document attached to an email (.rtf / Rich Text Format is the most universally accepted). Name your assignment files using both your names and some indication of the assignment and course as part of the attached file name. For example: Bob_Smith_Eng 102_#4 Likewise, all emails should use your registration name and English 101 or 102 in the subject line. The same pattern as the filename works fine: Bob_Smith_Eng 102_#4 If you have a question, please write “ENG 102 QUESTION” in the email subject line. On work days, I answer “QUESTION” emails first. Next I score final exams. After that, I will score work in the order received. While I aim to return student work within 5 days, there is variance during brief absences and high volume times. If my absence is near your course deadline, do not panic. Your timeline is extended relative to my delay, although your earlier effort is a factor as well. All assignments must use MLA format. Within the assignment, I will mark each type of error once. The student is responsible for locating and correcting all similar errors. Arrange for a proctor or testing center and request the final exam well before you expect to take it. The instructor will inform the student (via whatever means of communication we have been using) of the final grade at the same time it is submitted for processing. Save copies of all your work. SAVE EARLY. SAVE OFTEN. Save essays with comments when I return them. I have noticed that when students try to rush, they do not read and follow the directions carefully, thus earn low grades. Add my email address to your address book or whitelist. Using an internationally-based email address tends to land your messages in my spam folder, so sign up for a free local email. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 11 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II ADDITIONAL RESOURCES IN APPENDIX: How to Compute My English 102 Score Definition of Letter Grades Grading Rubric Sample Student Essays Assignment #1 – Syllabus Search-Quiz Assignment #6 – Works Cited Activity Optional Resources if You Have Internet Access Final Exam Review Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 12 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II ESSAY FORMAT EXPECTATIONS: All assignments and essays should adhere to current MLA guidelines as listed in any current writing handbook or online reference. Double space EVERYTHING. Use Times, Courier, Arial or a similar 12 pt. font, and traditional 1" margins. A full page of double-spaced text generally produces 250 words. Be sure to include the appropriate labels on page one and a running header on all pages after page one, as called for in MLA style. Write all assignments in formal, Standard English. Although our first drafts may often be written “as we speak,” final drafts should not reflect our daily slang. Be aware of cliché and colloquialism, and revise by writing more formally and much more concretely than we speak. Do not use contractions. Do not use any forms of “you”. Use a more precise, specific, concrete word instead. Creating the label for the first page: (All double spaced – top left corner) Student Name ASU English 102 Instructor Novotny 30 Jan 2016 Assignment #4 Do not place label in header. Creating the running head in most word programs: After typing your document, Select / Click Insert Page Numbers Position: Top of Page Alignment: Right Type your last name in front of the number on page 2, and add a space Click OK and close. This returns you to your document. See Also: the sample papers in the MLA section of your handbook, and in the appendix of the study guide. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 13 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II STUDY GUIDE ABOUT ME LETTER: __________________ Send a brief letter of introduction to the instructor, to establish communication. Write one or two paragraphs. Tell me how you got your name, one thing you would like to do some day, the last time you wrote four sentences in a row – for any reason – why you are taking this class, your major / minor, one fear or concern you have about this course, what time frame we need to work with, and any other pertinent information. Include a current mailing address and an email address if you have one. enovotny@adams.edu Save work as a word document and attach to an e-mail message, use both your names and some indication of the assignment and course as part of the attached file name (also helpful in the subject line of email). For example: Bob_Smith_Eng 102_about me ASSIGNMENT #1: SYLLABUS SEARCH-QUIZ ______ (100 points) Locate the Assignment #1 – Syllabus Search-Quiz in the Appendix section. Complete Assignment #1. Submit it for grading. REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS: Hacker, Diana and Nancy Sommers. A Writer's Reference. 7th ed. Boston: Bedford/ St.Martin's, 2011. Print. ISBN-13: 978-0-312-60143-0. An e-Book version of this text is also available from Bedford/St. Martin's for half the price of the hard copy. Visit the publisher’s website. Barnet, Sylvan and Hugo Bedau. From Critical Thinking to Argument: A Portable Guide. 4th ed. Boston: Bedford / St. Martin’s, 2014. Print. ISBN-13: 978-1-4576-4995-0. Additional writing resources from the publisher of our textbooks: http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/rewriting2e Re: Writing 3. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 15 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Note: You will read the entire Critical Thinking textbook. Chapters 8, 9, 10 are very interesting and useful (even required content at some colleges and universities) but are not tested material in this course. INTRODUCTION AND REVIEW _______ ____________ Read Preface p. iii - vi Notice the bulleted ideas. You will practice each of these skills as you work through the course assignments. Part One: From Critical Thinking to Argument and Research Skills: Writing with sources, citation and works cited, blending quotes smoothly. Read Chapter 1: Critical Thinking p. 3-8 th TO THINK Webster’s 9 Collegiate Dictionary To form or have in mind To conceive To hold in one’s opinion To judge or consider To believe, surmise or expect To determine, resolve or work out To bring to mind To form an idea of To use the mind for arriving at conclusions, making decisions, drawing inferences To reflect or to reason To weigh something mentally To remember To discover, seek, or invent To reconsider The act of thinking Writing is a thinking and learning process. WRITING IS A THINKING AND LEARNING PROCESS Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 16 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Notice the quoted statements: Emerson, Didion, and Russell. Notice “A Rule for Writers” suggestion boxes p. 9 and p. 11. Notice p. 10 “We try to see [an issue] from all sides before we come to our conclusion. We conduct an argument with ourselves, advancing and then questioning opinions: what can be said for the proposition, and what can be said against it?” Overall, critical thinking involves ongoing analysis, evaluation, and imagination. Notice Frost’s quote p. 16. Notice the “Checklist for Critical Thinking” p. 22. Notice the “Checklist for Evaluating Letters of Response” p. 30. Notice the “Checklist for Examining Assumptions” p. 32. Read Jena McGregor’s Washington Post blog “Military Women in Combat: Why Making it Official Matters,” critically, evaluatively. p. 32. Read “Topics For Critical Thinking and Writing” following McGregor, p. 35. Read Chapter 2: Critical Reading: Getting Started p. 39 - 69 SKILL: Critical, active reading Notice the “Reading with a Careful Eye: Underlining, Highlighting, Annotating” discussion and the sample on p. 41-42. This is a sample of what you should do every time you are reading for information, especially in academia. Annotate the text: “When you annotate, you open up a dialogue between the reader and the text; you communicate” (From Mirror on America: Short Essays and Images from Popular Culture by Joan T. Nims and Elizabeth M. Nollen 6). a. circle unfamiliar vocab. b. underline important sentences or phrases, especially thesis c. mark interesting or well-written sentences or phrases d. jot questions in the margin e. connect ideas to your own experiences f. place question marks (???) by phrases or ideas you do not accept or do not understand g. REACT Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 17 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Read in Hacker’s A Writer’s Reference “Read Actively” section A1-a. Excellent list. Notice “This; Therefore, That” content on p. 42. The bulleted statements work great as thesis statement starters. SKILLS: Read “Summarizing and Paraphrasing” p. 45. Take special note of the difference between summarizing and paraphrasing. Notice the bullets about paraphrasing p. 46. Notice “A Rule for Writers” suggestion box p. 52. Usually just quote original sources to avoid any plagiarism concerns. Notice the bullets about summary p. 53. Read Susan Jacoby’s essay “A First Amendment Junkie” p. 53 with a critical and evaluative eye. Notice she does not use the pronoun “you”. Identify her thesis and main points. Carefully read the summary of Jacoby’s essay (immediately following). Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 18 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II ASSIGNMENT 2: PRO VS. CON LIST ___________ 100 points Skills: Critical thinking, balance, logic, questioning, examining assumptions 1. Read an opinion piece in our textbook: Jena McGregor “Military Women in Combat: Why Making it Official Matters” p. 32. Susan Jacoby “A First Amendment Junkie” p. 53 Zachary Shemtob and David Lat “Executions Should Be Televised” p. 61 Nicholas Kristof “For Environmental Balance, Pick Up A Rifle” p. 156 James McWilliams “The Locavore Myth: Why Buying From Nearby Farms Won’t Save the Planet” p. 302 Michelle Dean “Here Comes the Hillbilly, Again” p. 385 2. Notice the original date and source of publication. 3. Brainstorm a pro/con list about one of the topics discussed. I expect you to give the topic a thorough consideration, leaving no mental stone unturned. Use the checklist “Examining Assumptions” p. 32. 4. After you have listed all ideas, take a break. Come back to the list a few hours or a few days later, and add more ideas, remember, leave no mental stone unturned. Be certain I can tell which elements you added later (use bold, or underling, or caps). 5. List / Chart will be 1-3 pages (depending upon how you format your lists). 6. Label and running header should be in MLA format. When you have completed Assignment #2 Pro vs. Con List, submit the work to the instructor. Save work as a word document (.rtf / Rich Text Format is the most universally accepted). Name your assignment files using both your names and some indication of the assignment and course as part of the attached file name. For example: Bob_Smith_Eng 102_#2 Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 19 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Read in A Writer’s Reference (WR) MLA-3b “Integrating Sources: Using Signal Phrases” and MLA-4 “Documenting Sources” in-text citations and works cited. ASSIGNMENT 3: LETTER TO THE EDITOR ______100 points___ Skills: Critical thinking, examining assumptions, formulate response, quote, cite, 1. Write a 2-3 page letter to the editor in response to THE SAME essay you used for assignment #2 Pro-Con list. 2. We will use letter format, combined with an academic style (citations and work cited). 3. Be certain to name the author, title, name of publication and original date in the first line or two of the letter. 4. Discuss why you agree or disagree with some or all of the author’s points. Or, explain why, although you accept some or all of the author’s points, you think the author has neglected others. Identify any concerns the author neglected to discuss. 5. Quote the essay at least twice, using the textbook page numbers, per MLA format. 6. Give an MLA work cited at the end of the document (use the “Work in an Anthology” format). Sample: Andrews, Emily. “Why I Don’t Spare ‘Spare Change’.” From Critical Thinking To Argument. 4th ed. Sylvan Barnet and Hugo Bedau, eds. Boston: Bedford /St. Martin’s, 2014. 209 - 211. Print. Double space everything Indent second and subsequent lines of each citation. First line is flush on left margin. For the 2nd, indented line, you first have to hit “enter” to break the line. Then hit ‘tab’ and the 2nd line will indent. 7. See Rule for Writers: “Present yourself so that your readers see you as knowledgeable, honest, open-minded, and interested in helping them to think about an issue of significance” (198). When you have completed Assignment #3 Letter to the Editor, submit the work to the instructor. Save work as a word document (.rtf / Rich Text Format is the most universally accepted). Name your assignment files using both your names and some indication of the assignment and course as part of the attached file name. For example: Bob_Smith_Eng 102_#3 Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 20 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Read Chapter 3: Critical Reading: Getting Deeper into Arguments p. 70 Note: The information contained in this chapter is essential to all argument, from both the reading and the writing perspective. SKILLS: Persuasion, Argument, Logos, Pathos, Dispute, Tone, Ethos, Topic, Induction, Deduction, Definition, Definition by synonym, Definition by example, Definition by stipulation, Mention of the essence, Set of sufficient and necessary conditions, Assumptions, Premises, Syllogism, Enthymeme, Sound arguments, Truth, Validity, False premises, Invalid syllogisms, Fallacies, Generalizations, Counterexamples, Samples, Representative samples, Evidence, Experimentation, Examples, Real events, Invented instances, Analogies, Authoritative Testimony, Authority of personal experience, Statistics, (Checklist for Analyzing Statistical Evidence), (Thesis) Argumentation 1. Appeals to logic and sound reasoning. 2. Uses facts, figures, statistics for support. 3. Requires careful thought. 4. Attempts to convince readers of the logic/soundness of your point. Persuasion 1. Appeals to readers emotions, values, beliefs. 2. Uses emotionally charged language. 3. Attempts to convince reader of the "rightness" of your point. 4. Attempts to convert agreement into action. Argumentation and Persuasion are usually combined because humans are both rational and emotional. Thus, emotion supports logic and sound reasoning. Read in A Writer’s Reference “Constructing Reasonable Arguments” section A2. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 21 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Notice the many different types of evidence writers use to support their arguments p. 90 - 101. Experimentation Examples Authoritative Testimony, Statistics Notice the “Checklist for Analyzing Statistical Evidence” p. 101. Read George F. Will’s essay “Being Green at Ben and Jerry’s” p. 109. Identify the thesis and main points. Look for every skill of argument discussed in Ch. 3 (see above). Carefully read the analysis of Will’s essay (immediately following). Notice it is not only a summary – in fact very little is direct summary – because most of the main ideas come out through your analysis. Notice also how Will’s essay is quoted in the analysis. This is an example of what you are about to do in the article analysis, though you will also include the (parenthetical) page number from which the quote was taken. SKILL: Source-Based Writing: Skip ahead to Chapter 7 – read “Quoting From Sources” p. 241 – 266. This section explains the MLA style of in-text citations. Read carefully and follow the examples and directions precisely. Read Hacker’s A Writer’s Reference “Integrating Sources” in the MLA-3 section. NOTE: Need to introduce the quote with a signal phrase, and statement about the source’s relevance. Blending Quotes Smoothly Into Your Own Writing o Signal Phrase at the Beginning: o According to Colombo, the myth of individual opportunity “is the engine that drives the American dream” (135). o Signal Phrase at the Middle: o “History complicates the myth of [individual opportunity]. [Success] can bind as effectively as it can liberate; it can enforce conformity,” according to Colombo, “and limit life chances as well as foster individual” opportunity (138). Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 22 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II o Signal Phrase at the End: o The myth of individual opportunity “is the engine that drives the American dream,” according to Colombo (135). o No Signal Phrase - Entirely Parenthetical Reference to Author: o The myth of individual opportunity “is the engine that drives the American dream” (Colombo 135). o Note – if you decide to paraphrase an original source, you still MUST give credit where credit is due. All the same signal phrasing options exist, the only difference is that you do not use quotation marks, since you are only borrowing ideas, not words. When in doubt – just QUOTE the original and use the appropriate citations systems. o Notice again: no year, no comma, no p / pg / pgs in MLA format in-text citation For stronger writing style, use many different synonyms for “says”: explains clarifies lists complains demands insists contends argues begs theorizes declares illustrates interprets finds describes hints implores claims advises cautions apologizes attacks cheers briefs outlines . . . See also A Writer’s Reference “Integrating Sources” section MLA-3. ***NOTE: I know these details are pesky – but each academic discipline insists upon the importance of following a standardized format. English uses MLA. I am not asking you to memorize anything – just know where to find the answers in your textbook so you are able to correctly and effectively cite secondary sources. Now you know HOW to quote. Remember to avoid plagiarism. Read “The Use and Abuse of Quotations” p. 243. Note “Rule for Writers” p. 243. GIVE CREDIT to borrowed thoughts and words. Read WR “Summarizing Without Plagiarising” R3-c. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 23 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Chapter 4: Visual Arguments (while this is valid and interesting information, it is not a critical element in the scope of this course). Optional reading. Consider the debate about photographs of soldier’s coffins as a research topic. SKILL: Writing a Thesis *Read p. 178 -179. * Read in Hacker’s A Writer’s Reference “Writing Effective Thesis Statements” sections C1-c and C2-a. * See Checklist for Thesis p. 156. * Avoid these COMMON THESIS ERRORS: 1. A thesis cannot be a fragment. 2. A thesis must not be worded as a question. 3. A thesis must be neither too broad nor contain unrelated elements. 4. A thesis should not contain phrases like "I think" or "In my opinion" because they weaken the writer's argument. 5. A thesis should not be expressed in vague, muddled, or incoherent language. 6. A thesis should not be expressed in figurative terms. *Aim for these EASY THESIS FLIPS: 1. A thesis can be 1-2 complete sentences. 2. A thesis can be worded as the answer to a question 3. A thesis topic must be focused and specific. 4. A thesis should contain only related elements. 5. A thesis should not usually contain phrases like "I think" or "In my opinion" because they weaken the writer's argument. 6. A thesis should be expressed in specific, concrete language. 7. A thesis must be expressed in clear, precise language. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 24 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II 12 Methods for Writing a Thesis or Topic Sentence 1. Occasion / Position Statements Before you make the decision to light up a cigarette, consider the problems caused by smoking. 2. Number Statements The architect presented several options to the committee. 3. However Statements The new rules for the school cafeteria seemed unfair to the students; however, the rules have made the cafeteria a better place to eat lunch. 4. And / But / Or Statements I enjoy most music, but jazz is my favorite. 5. A Few Good Prepositions In case of a fire, all families should make an escape plan and practice it. 6. To, Plus a Verb To win at chess, players need to master three skills. 7. The List Statement Joe’s Café offers the best in service, food, and atmosphere. 8. Declarative Statement Police Officer’s salaries must be increased. 9. Side-By-Side Statements A little wine may be good. Too much is dangerous. 10. Semicolon Statements Human friends are good; canine friends are better. 11. Two Nouns and Two Commas Snare drums and maracas, percussion instruments, help keep the rhythm in music. 12. Using a quotation When Mark Twain said, “Wrinkles should merely indicate where the smiles have been,” it reminded me of my grandma. From Step-Up to Writing Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 25 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II ASSIGNMENT 4: WRITING A THESIS STATEMENT ______100 points___ Skills: Thesis, logic, critical thinking, precise word choice See p. 212 - 213 in the Critical Thinking textbook. Write an improved thesis statement for all seven of the topic choices. (You may flip from the pro to con). Use more specific and formal language than the original. Use precise word choice. Identify, by name, which of the 12 Methods for Writing a Thesis (above) you used. Do not use any method more than once. 1. Students in laboratory courses should not be required to participate in the dissection of animals. 2. Washington D.C. should be granted statehood. 3. Women should, in wartime, be exempted from serving in combat. 4. The annual Miss America contest is an insult to women. 5. The government should not offer financial support to the arts. 6. The chief fault of the curriculum in high school was . . . 7. No specific courses should be required in colleges or universities. When you have completed Assignment #4: Writing a Thesis Statement, submit the work to the instructor. Save MLA formatted work as a word document (.rtf). Name your assignment files using both your names and some indication of the assignment and course as part of the attached file name. Keep copies of all your work. A Word About Words: SKILL: Word Choice Read “Tone and the Writer’s Persona” p. 196 – 203 Writers must always use specific, concrete language to make the ideas more real to the reader. Otherwise what you describe is more foggy, abstract, vague. I want to see your idea in full color, alive, and breathing. You want the exactly right word – so there is no room for misunderstanding. Are you using the most precise, most concrete, most accurate word choice available – or just an average, generic, vague word? Highlight a word, select the ‘shift f7’ to access the computer’s internal dictionary and thesaurus. Word choices matter, especially those having to do with your main point. Expand your vocabulary. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 26 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Read Chapter 5: Writing an Analysis of an Argument p. 147 - 166 Notice the careful thinking process described in the 2nd paragraph starting on p. 147-148 Notice the boxed information about Transitions and Verbs which help you draw conclusions and imply proof p. 149. Notice the bulleted information “Examining the Author’s Methods” p. 149. Notice that you will need to write your own thesis when analyzing another piece of writing. Notice the “Checklist for Analyzing an Author’s Intended Audience” p. 153. Notice the “Checklist for Analyzing a Text” p. 155. Read in A Writer’s Reference “Guidelines for Analyzing a Text” sections A1-d and A1-e. Overall, Ch. 5 instructs step-by-step ‘how to write an analysis’. Read Nicholas D. Kristoff’s essay “For Environmental Balance, Pick Up A Rifle” p. 156. Identify the thesis and main points, purpose, methods, persona, etc. Carefully read the analysis of Kristoff’s essay (immediately following). Notice it is not only a summary. This is an example of analysis, which is the next assignment. Carefully read Betsy Swinton’s analysis of Kistoff’s essay. This is another example of what you are about to do. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 27 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II MLA rules new in 2010 – Give a medium of publication label at the end of every entry: print, web, radio, television, cd, audiocassette, film, videocassette, dvd, performance, lecture, and pdf file. Italicize name of Publication or Website (only Underline if you are handwriting – like on the final exam!!!). Capitalize the “First Letter of all Title Words” – even if original did not. Likewise – do not use all caps – even if the original did. We no longer include the since it proved too unreliable as a research tool. Write name of website in standard English, Italicized – not as a web address. Web-accessed sources need posted or updated date and your access date. Write the name of an electronic source (in italics) in standard English – not as a web address. All dates are inverted: 22 May 2016. All months use a three letter abbreviation. (May is not abbreviated). Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 28 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II ASSIGNMENT 5: ANALYSIS OF A TEXTBOOK ESSAY 100 points___ Skills: analysis of audience, purpose, tone; response, quote, cite, critical thinking, balance, logic, questioning, examining assumptions 1. Select / Read an essay in our textbook: (these all happen to be student essays) Jeffries “Play Ball: Why Homeschoolers Should Be Allowed to Play on Public School Teams” p. 13 Wilde “Why the Pledge of Allegiance Should Be Revised” p. 65 Smith “Pledging Nothing?” p. 140 Timmerman “An Argument for Corporate Responsibility” p. 273 2. Write an analysis of one selected piece 3-5 pages. Use the “Checklist for Analysis of an Argument” p. 108. FACTS Paragraph: (fairly short) Provide author, title, date and source of article. Quote or paraphrase author’s thesis. Provide your over-all opinion of both the author’s argument and the writing (this is YOUR thesis). (Thesis sample: While I agree with his / her premise that YYZZ, Smith was neither thorough nor clear in his/her argument.) (See also “12 Methods For Writing A Thesis Statement”) ANALYSIS Paragraphs: Discuss the article in terms of the author and his/her writing. Identify the tone of the writing and list several words or phrases which demonstrate the tone. Is the author biased? Objective? Thorough? Hasty? Complete? Informed? Authority on topic? Justly emotional or biased? Defensive? Welcoming? Provide complete evidence to support their point? Use clear style and organization? Provide solutions? Aware of audience? Use tone to advance his/her opinion? What is the author’s purpose in writing this? (Do not use this as a laundry list for rote answers. Use this list as a guide to brainstorm ideas about your analysis / assessment / consideration of this piece of writing. Answer only those which spark interesting and relevant ideas.) REACTION Paragraphs: Share your personal/political/professional responses. Label your emotional reaction to the article or the topic (clarify which you are discussing) in no less than 2 terms. Why do you feel this way? With what do you agree? Disagree? Pick out a phrase that you feel is especially well-worded and interesting for the author’s purpose and QUOTE it. Identify any ideas which the author expressed that you had not thought of. Can you think of any ideas the author did not Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 29 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II include? Clarify your feelings about the issue. Share your insights and solutions to the issue. Do you have any advice or support for the author? 3. Incorporate at least two quotes into your discussion, using standard MLA in-text citation format. 4. Include a Work Cited page at the end of the document (use the “Selections From an Anthology” format). Be careful to clarify between the topic the author has chosen and the author’s success at communicating. You may disagree with an author’s POINT, but still recognize that he / she has written well. THIS DOES NOT ASK FOR A SUMMARY OF THE ARTICLE. Good writers re-name the author regularly, especially when starting a new paragraph. In academic writing, we refer to others by full name or last name alone, but never by first name alone, and never by Mr. / Miss / Mrs./ Ms. titles When you have completed Assignment #5: Analysis of a Textbook Essay, submit the work to the instructor. Save MLA formatted work as a word document (.rtf). Name your assignment files using both your names and some indication of the assignment and course as part of the attached file name. Keep copies of all your work. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 30 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II SKILL: MLA FORMAT WORKS CITED Review WR “MLA” Works Cited section In Writer’s Reference, read the annotations along the margins of the entire Anna Orlov “Sample MLA Paper” in section MLA-5c. Skim section, again, so that you are generally aware of where to look for an answer. Notice that there is a citation format for EVERY type of source. Notice the typical pattern of information repeats for every different type of source. Read “Citation Generators” p. 237 Read the annotations along the margins of the entire Lesley Timmerman “Student Research Paper in MLA Format” p. 273 – 280. Accurate citation in MLA format is a major component of English 102. Any format is exacting and tricky -- but consistent once you grasp the basic concepts. It is especially important to understand the information (not memorize) because works cited skills are on the (open book) final exam as well. (See “Exam Review” in Appendix). ASSIGNMENT #6 WORKS CITED ACTIVITY ______100 points___ Locate the Assignment #6 – Works Cited Activity in the Appendix section. Complete Assignment. Submit it for grading. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 31 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II For further discussion of distinctive argumentative and persuasive methods, read Part Two: Further Views On Argument. Each of these are interesting and academically revealing, but are not a direct part of our course content. Chapter 8: A Philosopher’s View: The Toulmin Method Chapter 9: A Logician’s View: Deduction, Induction, Fallacies Chapter 10: A Psychologist’s View: Rogerian Argument Now you will begin the process of writing your own argumentative / persuasive source-based essay. The textbook chapters and coordinating assignments #6 –10 lead you through the steps of scholarly, source-based writing. Assignment #10 is the final product. Each assignment is a distinct, graded submission, even while each step builds upon the previous work. Read in WR MLA-5b and 5c “Highlights of One Student’s Research Process” Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 32 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II OVERVIEW of ASSIGNMENTS 7 - 11: ARGUMENTATIVE SOURCE-BASED ESSAY A CURRENT TOPIC IN MY MAJOR or MINOR Essay Guidelines 1. Write 7-9 pages following current MLA manuscript format and citation style. 2. Present and support your thesis / claim / viewpoint. 3. Find at least 12 scholarly sources. 4. Incorporate at least 6 scholarly sources into your final project. 5. Include a title, works cited page, and AT LEAST 6 citations (quote or paraphrase). 6. Be prepared to submit notes, draft, and copies of (or links to) all cited sources if asked. Essay Skills 1. Using direct quotations and paraphrases smoothly and effectively. 2. Forming a working and final thesis statement. 3. Researching for evidence and evaluating sources (MUST USE SCHOLARLY JOURNALS IN YOUR FIELD). 4. Using evidence and reasoning. 5. Using standard English mechanics and grammar, and current MLA style. 6. Developing voice and audience awareness in writing. 7. Reading and following directions for all parts of an assignment. 8. Seeking a current and relevant topic in your major or minor. Argumentative Source-Based Essay – Notes *My students learn the most when they attempt to meet or correspond with someone who works in your field of interest. Interview him / her about that field of study to identify current, relevant, interesting, important topics about which to write. If a meeting or correspondence is not possible, read in current publications about current studies / events happening in your field of interest, or search for an appropriate YouTube speech or interview. *Access scholarly publications in your field by using your college’s or ASU’s database, EbscoHost, Academic Search Premier, LexisNexis, Academic OneFile, etc. *You will need to pay special attention to the “Articles in Periodicals” and “Online Sources” sections of your MLA handbook to cite these correctly (see especially the “Article From a Database” section). Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 33 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Read Chapter 6: Developing an Argument of Your Own (With an Audience in Mind) p. 167 See the “Researching” chapter in Writer’s Reference. Great sample calendar. Notice numbered lists, bulleted info, graphs, charts Notice Testing a Working Thesis C1-c Notice Checklist for Assessing the Writing Situation C1-b Notice Checklist for Global Revision C3-b. USE THIS!!! Notice Checklist for Audience p. 160 and 177 See p. 191 -193 “Choosing a Topic” Read the entire WR “Understanding an Assignment”. C1-b. Re-read the appropriate pages before completing each assignment. Read in WR “Constructing Reasonable Arguments” section A2. * Selecting a topic with a strong personal connection often produces the most interesting research and work from my students. * Consider issues in your major or minor area of study. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 34 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II ASSIGNMENT 7: Developing an Argument of Your Own - A Beginning There are 6 steps in Assignment #7. __ ______ 100 points Skill: invention, questioning, selecting a topic Step 1 (Invention Strategies p. 168 - 171 and WR C1-b “Explore Your Subject”): A. Complete 3 different invention strategies for one topic. (Cluster, list, free write, chart, etc.). B. Complete 3 different invention strategies for a second topic. Use no invention strategy more than 2 times. C. Go back to these invention strategies after a break (several hours to several days) and add to the ideas. Each successive strategy should produce a few new ideas. Step 2 (Asking Questions p. 171 – 178 and C1-b): A. Select one of your topics from STEP ONE, ABOVE. B. Complete a questioning process to further discover your stance on the topic issue. Explore the 5 basic questions for one of your topics. This will take 1-2 pages. C. Go back to the questioning strategies after a break (several hours to several days) and add to the ideas. NOTE: At this point, you have explored several ideas for a source-based topic in your major or minor. After careful consideration, you must now select ONE topic for your remaining assignments. SKILL: Academic Research: Access scholarly publications in your field by using your college’s or ASU’s database, EbscoHost, Academic Search Premier, LexisNexis, etc. Read the “Researching” section in Writer’s Reference. Notice especially in Writer’s Reference R1-c “To Locate Articles, Search a Database” and the additional sites listed in R1-e “To Locate Other Sources, Use a Variety of Online Tools.” Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 35 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Students in print-based courses may contact our Distance Education Librarian for help with their research. Rosanna Ensley is available to assist students with their literature searches. If there are additional questions, please feel free to contact us: Rosanna Ensley rensley@adams.edu Distance Education Librarian Nielsen Library – Adams State University Alamosa, CO 81101 (719) 587-7174 (Incarcerated students: the reference librarian would also be happy to perform a literature search for the student and send along relevant results. Send some kind of thesis statement and a few research keywords to the Distance Education Librarian). If your local librarian offers a tour or a lesson, take it!!!!!! Ask your writing center for a guidance. Regardless of when you have a question, askacademic can help. This is a 24/7 online reference service for college students everywhere. A .com website is not considered a reliable source for academic work since it is not peer reviewed in any way. In fact, I can buy my own .com website and post anything I want – no matter how erroneous. My money bought it – I own it. .edu / .gov / some .org are more reliable. The whole point of academic writing using research citations is that a future scholar could follow your intellectual path. Be certain to keep clear notes, so you can cite accurately. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 36 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Read Chapter 7: Using Sources in MLA Format p. 214 - 280 Read A Writer’s Reference R3 “Managing Information” and “Taking Notes Without Plagiarizing”. Skim WR “MLA” section, again. Note the detailed and thorough information in the Writer’s Reference handbook, as opposed to the brief overview of MLA format offered in the Critical Thinking textbook. Notice the Checklist for Papers Using Sources p. 271 in in the Critical Thinking textbook, and MLA-4 “Reviewing an MLA Paper: Use of Sources” in WR. Read the annotations along the margins of the entire Lesley Timmerman “Student Research Paper in MLA Format” p. 273 – 280. Step 3: Explore your topic by conducting research R1-b in WR Gather ideas from a variety of sources, including both print and non-print sources. NOTE 1: As much as each student’s access allows, scholarly sources should provide the majority of your support. NOTE 2: I strongly recommend including an interview, p. 224. Or, if you have access, search YouTube for an interview or speech in your topic. NOTE 3: Be aware, the instructor may request a copy of your sources, or at least the first page or the page you quote from for each source, if it is necessary to prove validity and accuracy. Step 4: Evaluate the quality of each source (checklists p. 226-7, 230 and 231). Never use Wiki anything for college-level work except in the very early brainstorming / idea gathering stages of a project. See p. 221 “A Word About Wikipedia” and “Finding Quality Material on the Web” p. 219 – 223. Step 5: Read the source for relevance to your argument. Consider each source through a full analysis, as in earlier assignments. This is a time consuming thinking and learning and mulling and reconsidering ideas step. Step 6: Take notes as necessary (p. 229 – 235). Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 37 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Submit some evidence of ALL STEPS 1 - 6 for your one selected argumentative topic for the assignment. This should be enough (brainstorming, questions, notes, research, links) to prove to me you are conducting original and authentic work. This may be easiest to send along as more than one attached document – just be certain to label clearly that these all create your body of evidence for the assignment. Some students upload a free scanner application to their smart phone or tablet device for ease of gathering, organizing, sending hand-written documents. When you have completed all 6 steps of Assignment #7: Developing an Argument of Your Own – A Beginning, submit the work to the instructor. Name your assignment files using both your names and some indication of the assignment and course as part of the attached file name. Keep copies of all your work. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 38 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II ASSIGNMENT 8: Compiling an Annotated Bibliography __ __ 100 points___ Skill: MLA format works cited, analysis, evaluation of sources, research Step 7 Read about Annotated Bibliography p. 236 – 237 Read section R3-a in Writer’s Reference Use the bullets R2-c and R2-d See the sample in the Appendix Compile an Annotated Bibliography of your sources so far, including a variety of print and non-print sources (like an interview), about 12 total. For each source, create an MLA style citation, and then offer several more evaluative sentences, as prompted in the textbook. Besides identifying the thesis / purpose / point of each source, your comments in the annotations may refer to the validity (or non-validity) of the source, a summary of the contents, an analysis of the contents, and how it relates to your own exploration of ideas. The 12 sources will not necessarily all be used for your final project. In fact, after completing this evaluative process you should be able to eliminate weak or invalid sources. Each annotation is a mini-analysis. When you have completed Assignment #8: Compiling an Annotated Bibliography, submit the work to the instructor. Save MLA formatted work as a word document (.rtf). Name your assignment files using both your names and some indication of the assignment and course as part of the attached file name. Keep copies of all your work. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 39 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II ASSIGNMENT 9: Developing an Argument of Your Own - A Middle ____ 100 points___ Skills: audience awareness, thesis, organizing ideas Step 8: (Audience p. 179 – 183): In about one page, respond briefly to the bulleted “Imagining an Audience” questions on p. 183. Step 9: (Thesis C1-c and C2-a in WR and see the “12 Methods for Writing a Thesis” notes in this study guide): Write 4 possible thesis statements for your argument. After I make comments for revisions, you will use one for your introduction and one for your conclusion. Step 10: (Organizing the Body of the Essay p. 189 - 192 and 194 - 197): Notice the quote on p. 189 contrasting writing a draft to brain surgery: “The beautiful part of writing is that you don’t have to get it right the first time – unlike, say, a brain surgeon” (Cromier 189). Write several statements / sentences / bullets for each element #1-6 p. 189 and 190. When you have completed Assignment #9: Developing an Argument of Your Own – A Middle, submit the work to the instructor. Name your assignment files using both your names and some indication of the assignment and course as part of the attached file name. Keep copies of all your work. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 40 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Skill: Strategies for Refuting Evidence Deny the Truth of the Data Cite Counterexamples or Countertestimony Cast Doubt on the Representativeness or Sufficiency of Examples Cast Doubt on the Relevance or Recency of the Examples, Statistics, or Testimony Question the Credibility of an Authority Question the Accuracy or Context of Quotations Question the Way Statistical Data Were Produced or Interpreted From Ramage, Bean, and Johnson. Writing Arguments: A Rhetoric With Readings. 6th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Learning, 2004. Print. Ch 8. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 41 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II ASSIGNMENT 10: Developing an Argument of Your Own - The Draft ___ 200 points___ Refer back to the Overview: Assignments 7-11 detailed instructions to refresh your memory of the expectations. Skills: Synthesis of ideas, quote, paraphrase, citation, MLA format, logic, coherence, argument, audience, draft, etc., etc., etc. Step 11 WR “Drafting” C2: A. Write a complete draft of your argumentative essay. At this point, the introduction and the conclusion may be very sketchy . . . just your thesis. See “The First Draft.” And “Later Drafts” p. 238-239. B. The body of the essay will likely follow the pattern outlined on p. 189. Develop your discussion using at least 6 of your researched sources as support for your own argument, blending no less than 6 quotes into your argumentative essay, using MLA format. Step 12: Review the “Checklist for Papers Using Sources” p. 271. Step 13: Revising the Argumentative essay C3: A. Revise the drafted body paragraphs into a polished, final product. The introduction and conclusion still do not need to be complete, full, or polished. Right now – the main course of the essay matters more than the appetizer. B. Send in Assignment 8: The Draft so that I may easily assess what revision progress you have made, how your exploration has become more fine-tuned, how your thinking has developed and grown. When you have completed Assignment # 10: Developing an Argument of Your Own - The Draft, submit the work to the instructor. Name your assignment files using both your names and some indication of the assignment and course as part of the attached file name. Keep copies of all your work. NOW IS A GOOD TIME TO REQUEST THE FINAL EXAM. READ AHEAD SEVERAL PAGES FOR INSTRUCTIONS. The instructor will make comments. The student will then revise this work into the final source-based argument assignment, complete with introduction, conclusion, works cited. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 42 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II I recommend that students print returned draft including instructor comments. Then make the revisions to the original, using the returned comments systematically, like a checklist. (This also avoids having to undo all the instructor’s highlights and notes.) ASSIGNMENT 11: Finalizing an Argument of Your Own _______200 points__ Refer back to the assignment sheet to refresh your memory of the expectations. Remember to save often! This is the complete documented essay and works cited. Step 14: Read WR “Academic Writing” A2 – A4. Revise the draft to precisely reflect your thinking and instructor comments. Step 15: Write a title p. 184. Step 16: Write a formal introduction (p. 185) for this source-based essay. Step 17: Write a formal conclusion (p. 192) for this source-based essay. Step 18: Compile a Works Cited page as the last numbered page(s) of your essay, citing each source you have quoted or paraphrased. Be certain to incorporate the corrections and revisions the instructor made on the annotated bibliography assignment into this final product. Remove the annotations and unused sources. Step 19: Review the “Checklist for Global Revisions” C3-a and “Checklist for Papers Using Sources” p. 271. Step 20: Submit (and do a little dance of joy)! When you have completed Assignment #11: Finalizing an Argument of Your Own, submit the work to the instructor. Name your assignment files using both your names and some indication of the assignment and course as part of the attached file name. Keep copies of all your work. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 43 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II ASSIGNMENT 12: Proctored Final Exam ___________ 200 points___ Use the “Final Exam Review” appendix to prepare for the final exam. The final exam must be requested from Extended Studies using the Examination Request form provided in the course materials. You will provide the name and address of a proctor or testing center who will supervise the exam. The exam will be sent to the proctor or testing center. Stay in contact with the proctor or testing center so you know when the exam arrives. This process takes some time, so plan ahead. The final exam will consist of three parts. Part One is to write five thesis statements for the prompts provided. Part Two is to create accurate in-text citations for the prompts provided. Part Three is to edit and revise a Works Cited page using standard MLA style as described in the Writer’s Reference handbook. All three parts are open book. The exam must be completed in the three hours allowed. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 44 of 52 January 2015 ENG 102 – SECTION # 1256 COMMUNICATION ARTS II APPENDIX Prepared by: Ellen Simpson Novotny, M.A. Adams State University Department of English, Theatre, and Communication 208 Edgemont Blvd., Ste. 3070 Alamosa, CO 81101 Fax: (719) 587-8145 (must include instructor’s name) enovotny@adams.edu ©2015 Adams State University ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II COMPUTING YOUR ENGLISH 102 SCORE ASSIGNMENT 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. MY SCORE / POSSIBLE Syllabus Search Quiz ________ / 100 Pro vs. Con List ________ / 100 Letter to the Editor ________ / 100 Thesis Statements ________ / 100 Analysis of Textbook Essay ________ / 100 Works Cited Activity ________ / 100 Developing an Argument of Your Own – A Beginning ________ / 100 Step 1 Invention Strategies Step 2 Asking Questions Step 3: Explore your topic by conducting research Step 4: Evaluate the quality of each source Step 5: Read sources for relevance to the argument, thinking and exploring Step 6: Take notes as necessary 8. Compiling an Annotated Bibliography Step 7: Research, read, analyze, annotate, cite sources ________ / 100 9. Developing an Argument of Your Own – A Middle Step 8: Audience Step 9: Thesis Step 10: Organizing the Body of the Essay ________ / 100 10. Developing an Argument of Your Own – A Draft ________ / 200 Step 11 Drafting the Body of the Essay Step 12: Review the “Checklist for Papers Using Sources” Step 13: Revising the Argumentative essay 11. Finalizing an Argument of Your Own ________ / 200 Step 14: Writing the Research Essay Step 15: Write a Title Step 16: Write a formal introduction Step 17: Write a formal conclusion Step 18: Compile a Works Cited page as the last numbered pages Step 19: Review the “Checklist for Papers Using Sources” 12. Final Exam ________ / 400 1,700 total points (continued on next page) Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 1 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II * Divide the score you earned by the points possible to figure the score for one essay. For example: 80/100 = 80% = B* To compute your score in the overall course, add all the points you’ve earned. Divide that by the total of all the points possible for the essays you’ve attempted. For example: 75 + 82 + 85 + 70 = 312 (points earned) = 400 (points attempted) 312 / 400 = 82% = B Grading: 90-100% = A, 80-89% = B, 70-79% = C, 60-69% = D, below 60% = F See also “Definitions of Letter Grades” appendix. ****keep copies of all your work**** ***You must complete all assignments in order to pass this course. *** Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 2 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Characteristics of Letter Grades Student Name: E. Novotny 12/2010 __________________________________________________________ Date_____________________ CATEGOR "A" Exceeds Standard "B" Above Standard "C" Meets Standard "D" Below Standard Scor Y s s s s e Opening Compelling opening. Engaging opening. Passable opening. Weak / unclear Paragraph Clear, powerful thesis Effective thesis Thesis exists, but may opening. No thesis. identifies topic and identifies topic and be weak or outlines points to be hints toward outline. unbalanced. Shows freshness of Clearly stated Central idea Below average thought in stating and purpose, logically and organized clearly achievement in developing a central adequately developed. enough to convey its conceiving and theme or idea. Well Clearly individual purpose to the reader. expressing ideas above assignment insight or tone. Meets assignment. correctly/ effectively. expectations. Exceeds assignment Does not meet expectations. assignment. discussed. Ideas Sentence All sentences are well- Most sentences are Most sentences are Sentences are not Fluency constructed with varied well-constructed, with well constructed, but well-constructed or structure, and careful, some sentence there is little / no varied. precise word choice. variation. Some "just variation in structure. right" words and Clear, but basic word phrases. choices. Support and All of the support and Most of the support Support and detail are Support and details Details details are specific and and details are not specific. Support are NOT relevant relevant. Explanations specific and relevant. is mostly relevant. and/or are not show how each piece of Explanations show Weak explanation explained. evidence supports the how each piece of showing how position. evidence supports the evidence supports the position. position. Closing Complete closure brings Effective closure Cursory or haphazard There is no closure -- paragraph all ideas and position restating main ideas restatement of ideas. the paper just ends. together in compelling and position in fresh Same word usage as discussion. language. original. Authentic, lively voice Some sense of Any college student No sense of voice. sounds like author and personality. A few could have written Reads like a textbook no one else. Fresh way fresh ideas / phrases. this paper. No sense or newspaper. Voice of using words. of self, though some sense of humanity. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 5 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Grammar & No grammatical errors. No serious, distracting Contains some Contains serious Mechanics 0-2 mechanical / grammatical errors. 3- grammatical errors errors in the use of spelling errors. 4 mechanical / which distract reader grammar and spelling errors. from the content. mechanics. Needs More than 4 revision to earn a mechanical / spelling passing grade. errors. Format Overall Formatted according to Formatted according Formatted according NOT formatted all MLA / course to all MLA / course to major MLA / according to MLA / guidelines. guidelines. course guidelines. course guidelines. Contains all the positive Contains some The "C" paper may With more careful qualities of good qualities of good have few marks on it, proofreading, fuller writing: skillful writing, but lacks the but it lacks the vigor development, and sentence style, precise reinforcing qualities of thought and more perceptive word choice, clear of ideas and style expression which observation, "D" purpose and firm which characterize the would entitle it to an papers might receive support. "A" paper. above average rating. a higher mark. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 6 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II SAMPLE STUDENT WORK SAMPLE ESSAY 1 Student Name ASC English 102 June 30, 2012 Instructor Novotny Assignment #4 Dig for Spirituality in the Mind Laura DeVeau’s student essay “The Role of Spirituality and Religion in Mental Health”, published in the From Critical Thinking to Argument textbook edited by Sylvan Barnet and Hugo Bedau, is an intriguing piece of writing that is full of ideas for careful consideration. Deveau openly discusses the role spirituality plays in the lives and the health of society as she urges that “spiritual belief in general should be valued more highly than it is currently in mental health circles” (284). Leading up to introducing her argument, she suggests common opinions and thoughts on how religion and spiritualty exist in individual’s lives. After reflecting on this essay and the aspect of religion and spirituality in life, I fully agree with the author’s stance of a high importance of spirituality. However, she incorporates biased examples, which weaken her overall effect. DeVeau writes to inform society, more or less the mentally weak population as well as those in the psychology world, that a rise in spirituality could potentially offer a more stable and peaceful lifestyle. She immediately gets her readers thinking; “Who is responsible for all these different interpretations? Who would begin searching the truth to solve the answers of religion?”. She writes from a previous dilemma of her own on Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 7 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II the effects of spirituality on the mental state. In the second paragraph, she recognizes the opposing side +++ to the positive impact religion has, the members of psychology; however, she does continue to say, “how this exploration has changed her beliefs as well” (DeVeau 265). I certainly do not know the widespread research on religion and mental health, but I can tell that DeVeau is speaking from a somewhat biased +++ perspective as she has personal experience on the benefits of religion. Although, she does attempt to include all parts from the opposing side when she explains the “less structured spiritual practices such as meditation, yoga and the Cabala” (DeVeau 266). DeVeau moves to then confidently go back to her argument on the goodness of religion. She shares how a structured religion helps a child grow better with guidance and stability with concrete examples such as “handing a child a Cabala and saying, ‘Read this’ rather than bringing them to a church service” (DeVeau 267). She does a very fine job balancing out the positives to both sides, but she seems to include stronger, more persuasive features to prove her point to the audience. +++ DeVeau’s organization +++in this argumentative essay is well-done; she begins with her point, moves to the opposing side in which she will argue against, writes on a personal experience, explains how this would not benefit a child alike, and continues to bounce from religion being a prime aspect for the mental state and concerns critics have on how religion is of no use. When she makes an argument, she is sure to support it with an example or a statement. +++ For example, she acknowledges cults and theirs charismatic leaders, but then comes back and defends the religious side by saying, “If we are going to acknowledge these leaders, then we must do the same for the Christianity and Islam, founded on the teachings of charismatic leaders” (DeVeau 268). Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 8 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Her word choice is reasonable and keeps the readers attention. +++ DeVeau includes words when transitioning from one side to the other +++ like “Besides” (269), “Again, though”, “Another factor contributing” (268), and “While this may be true, there is also” (269). After she is through giving her statistics and research, she moves to get the reader to think of common sense and today’s world. In the final paragraph, she asks the reader “why then” (DeVeau 270), to stimulate a more thought-provoking process of their own and not from statistics. DeVeau completes her argument with thorough explanations and relevant statistics+++ most importantly to keep the reader attentive and attract convincing minds. As a religious individual myself, I do agree with DeVeau and her view on religion being a strong influence on the mental state. I can too share a similar experience of being brought up in the Catholic Church and looking to my parents for the truth on religion. After reading this essay, I felt very convinced and supported in that my religious journey does give me hope in my mind, strength and a meaning for life especially in that it keeps my mental state strong. I stand very much on DeVeau’s side with the New Wave and the benefits of becoming more in contact with one’s inner peace to promote a healthier mentality, as well as the statement she says about the “positive religious coping pattern being tied to benevolent outcomes due to a major stressful event” (269). I strongly believe in this specific statement and find it very compelling for a reader who may be on the fence about this topic. She then supports the statement with pointing out how the symptoms of the coping include “psychological distress and psychological and spiritual growth as a result of the stressor” (DeVeau 269-70). I think this a very common entrance for individuals into the spiritual mindset, including an event I experienced Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 9 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II myself causing my religion to bloom. I think this would be a good opportunity for the author to possibly include an example of an individual who experienced a dramatic spiritual upbringing due to a crisis they dealt with. An example would give the reader proof that this does occur and support her statement of “reports”. In short, I feel DeVeau produced a predominant and appealing essay with the credible facts and support; she notes “there is no right or wrong answer when it comes to self-fulfillment” (270). She continues to write, “It is whatever works for the individual… but, clearly there are benefits to be gained [by spirituality]”, as she engages the reader in deciding if spirituality is right for them, but makes it clear that spirituality does in fact initiate benefits for the mind; therefore, it needs to be acknowledged by mental health professionals whether they believe it or not (DeVeau 270). EFFECTIVE ANALYSIS. 96/ 100 = A Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 10 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Work Cited DeVeau, Laura. “The Role of Spirituality and Religion in Mental Health.” From Critical Thinking to Argument. 4th ed. Eds. Sylvan Barnet and Hugo Bedau. Boston: Bedford /St. Martin’s, 2014. 282 - 289. Print. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 11 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 12 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II SAMPLE ESSAY 2 Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 13 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 14 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 15 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 16 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II SAMPLE ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 17 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 18 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 19 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 20 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II ASSIGNMENT #1: SYLLABUS SEARCH-QUIZ _______ (100 points) You may remove these pages from the study guide and write directly on them. Then you may use US Postal or you may scan and submit jpeg files attached to email (a really good picture on your phone can work). Alternately, you may retype the whole thing if you would prefer to submit it that way. Search through the syllabus and study guide to answer the following questions. 1. Starting from the date of registration, how long do you have to complete the course? a. Minimum: _________________ weeks b. Minimum: _________________ weeks from date of first contact c. Maximum: _________________ year(s) 2. Effective writing is fundamental to student _l_______________ and _s______________ in every __d____________________. (fill in the blanks) 3. The textbooks are (circle one): totally optional required 4. The textbooks are available from (circle all that are true): the ASU bookstore ebook from the publisher. 5. Student will complete ________ assignments and ______ exam during the course. (fill in the blanks with a #) 6. ________ completed assignments and ______ exam are required to pass the course. (fill in the blank with a #) 7. All work submitted for this course must be __a_____________________ and _o__________________, meaning the student thought it, created it, and wrote it him / herself. (fill in the blanks) Instructor: Ellen Simpson Novotny, M.A. Name: ________________________________ (please print) Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 21 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II 8. What may happen to the student if plagiarized work is submitted? (short answer): 9. Even though the distance student is not on campus, he / she is responsible for following the ASU code of conduct. (circle one): true false 10. I may select my sister to be my proctor for the final exam. (circle one): true false 11. Students are strongly encouraged to select an arguable topic in their major or minor for the large project (assignments #7-11). (circle one): true false 12. This course uses what style format? (circle all that are true): APA CHICAGO MLA ACS 13. The proctored final exam is open book (circle one): true false 14. English 102 allows each writer unlimited revision opportunities. (circle one): true false 15. [Throughout the course,] the expectations __i____________________ for the student to demonstrate _i_____________________ skills. (fill in the blanks) 16. Before I submit an assignment, I need to label the file with certain information. My filename for assignment #5 will look like this (short answer): Instructor: Ellen Simpson Novotny, M.A. Name: ________________________________ (please print) Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 22 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II 17. What should you do after the instructor returns an assignment? (short answer) 18. What email subject line heading should the student use when emailing a question (circle the one that will get the fastest instructor response): URGENT English 101 my name QUESTION 19. ASU offers access to ADA accommodations and adaptations (circle one): true false 20. Most institutions do not accept “D” grades for transfer (circle one): true false 21. I can call the Extended Studies Office if I have a question at (fill in the blank): 1-800___________ 22. I can email the Extended Studies Office if I have a question at (fill in the blank): _______________________@adams.edu 23. This course is _i________________________ distance study. (fill in the blank) 24. The student (circle one): works at the same pace as the entire class / self-paces / follows a daily calendar 25. In MLA format, the student places a label on the top left / right of the first page of assignments. (circle one). Instructor: Ellen Simpson Novotny, M.A. Name: ________________________________ (please print) Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 23 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II 26. Enrollment in English 102 assumes _b_______________ writing skills, so the instructor has not assigned any _g__________________ study. However, the handbook A Writer’s Reference will assist you with many composition questions. (fill in the blanks) 27. The student can submit all the assignments at one time (circle one): true false 28. Choosing to _s_________ the reading selections is like choosing to _s__________ class. (fill in the blanks) 29. I will avoid using “_y_________” words in all academic writing. “_Y__________” is usually indefinite. I can use a more precise, _s___________________, _c___________________ word instead. (fill in the blanks) 30. Assignment grades are available immediately after student submits the work (circle one): true false 31. The final grade is posted to the transcript 10 minutes after the proctor submits the final exam (circle one): true false 32. All rules of Standard English apply to the course assignments (circle one): true false When you have completed the Syllabus Search-Quiz, submit it to the instructor. Instructor: Ellen Simpson Novotny, M.A. Name: ________________________________ (please print) Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 24 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II ASSIGNMENT #6 WORKS CITED ACTIVITY _____ 100 points___ NAME:____________________________________ Listing Sources Using MLA style From Models For Writers companion website Instructions: For each of the following pairs, choose the works-cited page entry that uses correct MLA style. AND explain WHY you selected your answer. (Explain what was wrong with the incorrect answer / or what is the correct technique for the citation). You may highlight or circle to help your explanation. 1. The writer has cited the article "Ghost Sonata" by Alex Ross. It is found on pages 64-71 of the New Yorker magazine dated March 24, 2003. Ross, Alex. "Ghost Sonata." New Yorker March 24 2003: 64-71. Print. Ross, Alex. "Ghost Sonata." New Yorker 24 Mar. 2003: 64-71. Print. EXPLAIN: Instructor: Ellen Simpson Novotny, M.A. Name: ________________________________ (please print) Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 25 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II 2. The writer has cited the book A Speaker's Guidebook by Dan O'Hare, Rob Stewart, and Hannah Rubenstein. It was published by Bedford/St. Martin's in Boston and New York in 2001. O'Hare, Dan, Rob Stewart, and Hannah Rubenstein. A Speaker's Guidebook. Boston: Bedford, 2001. Print. O'Hare, Dan, et al. A Speaker's Guidebook. Boston: Bedford, 2001. Print. EXPLAIN: 3. The writer has cited the book The Dragon in the Land of Snows by Tsering Shakya. The subtitle is A History of Modern Tibet Since 1947. The book was published in New York by Penguin Compass in 2000. Shakya, Tsering. The Dragon in the Land of Snows. New York: Penguin Compass, 2000. Print. Shakya, Tsering. The Dragon in the Land of Snows: A History of Modern Tibet Since 1947. New York: Penguin Compass, 2000. Print. EXPLAIN: Instructor: Ellen Simpson Novotny, M.A. Name: ________________________________ (please print) Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 26 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II 4. The writer has cited two works by Norman F. Cantor. One is Inventing the Middle Ages: The Lives, Works, and Ideas of the Great Medievalists of the Twentieth Century, published in 1991 by Quinn-William Morrow in New York. The other is The Civilization of the Middle Ages, published in 1994 by HarperPerennial in New York. Choose set a or set b. Cantor, Norman F. Civilization of the Middle Ages. New York: HarperPerennial, 1994. Cantor, Norman F. Inventing the Middle Ages: The Lives, Works, and Ideas of the Great Medievalists of the Twentieth Century. New York: Quinn-William Morrow, 1991. Print. Cantor, Norman F. Civilization of the Middle Ages. New York: HarperPerennial, 1994. ---Inventing the Middle Ages: The Lives, Works, and Ideas of the Great Medievalists of the Twentieth Century. New York: Quinn-William Morrow, 1991. Print. EXPLAIN: Instructor: Ellen Simpson Novotny, M.A. Name: ________________________________ (please print) Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 27 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II 5. The writer has cited an article, "Campaign Contributions: The Currency of Our Democracy," from a Web site called "Color of Money" found at www.colorofmoney.org. The site was last updated on December 11, 2003, and was read by the writer on December 14, 2003. The site is sponsored by the group Public Campaign. No individual writer or editor is named on the site. “Campaign Contributions: The Currency of Our Democracy." Color of Money. Public Campaign, 11 Dec. 2003. Web. 14 Dec. 2003. Anonymous. "Campaign Contributions: The Currency of Our Democracy." Color of Money. Dec. 11, 2003. Public Campaign. http://www.colorofmoney.org EXPLAIN: 6. The writer has cited a review of a book, Nelson Mandela's Favorite African Folk Tales, edited by Nelson Mandela. The review, entitled "Into the Woods," was written by K. Anthony Appiah and appeared on pages 46, 48, 50, and 51 of the New York Review of Books dated December 18, 2003. Appiah, K. Anthony. "Into the Woods." Rev. of Nelson Mandela's Favorite African Folk Tales, ed. Nelson Mandela. New York Review of Books 18 Dec. 2003: 46+. Print. Appiah, K. Anthony. "Into the Woods." New York Review of Books 18 Dec. 2003: 46-51. Print. EXPLAIN: Instructor: Ellen Simpson Novotny, M.A. Name: ________________________________ (please print) Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 28 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II 7. The writer has cited an article from the Web site of a newspaper, the Washington Post. The article, "Civil Rights Charges Dog Citizen Patrols on Border" by Evelyn Nieves, appeared on the site on December 15, 2003, and was read by the writer on December 18, 2003. The URL for the article is http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A75-2003Dec14.html. The site's sponsor is The Washington Post Company. Nieves, Evelyn. "Civil Rights Charges Dog Citizen Patrols on Border" Washington Post. 15 Dec. 2003. 18 Dec. 2003. Nieves, Evelyn. "Civil Rights Charges Dog Citizen Patrols on Border." Washington Post. The Washington Post Company, 15 Dec. 2003. Web. 18 Dec. 2003. EXPLAIN: 8. The writer has cited an article, "American Gothic" by Rebecca Traister, from an online magazine, Salon.com, that does not appear in print form. The article appeared on December 8, 2003, and was read on December 18, 2003. The article is thirty paragraphs long, and the URL is http://www.salon.com/mwt/feature/2003/12/18/thurmond/index.html. Salon.com is sponsored by Salon Media Group. Traister, Rebecca. "American Gothic." Salon.com 18 Dec. 2003. 30 pars. . Traister, Rebecca. "American Gothic." Salon.com. Salon Media Group, 18 Dec. 2003. Web. 18 Dec. 2003. EXPLAIN: Instructor: Ellen Simpson Novotny, M.A. Name: ________________________________ (please print) Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 29 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II 9. The writer has cited a book, Psychology, by Peter Gray. The writer used the fourth edition, published in 2002 in New York by Worth Publishers. Gray, Peter. Psychology. 4th ed. New York: Worth, 2002. Print. Gray, Peter. Psychology. New York: Worth, 2002. Print. EXPLAIN: 10. The writer has cited a film, Jason and the Argonauts, which was released in 1953 by Columbia Pictures. The film stars Todd Armstrong and Nancy Kovack, with Don Chaffey directing. The writer watched a DVD released by Columbia Tristar in 1998. Jason and the Argonauts. Dir. Don Chaffey. Perf. Todd Armstrong and Nancy Kovack. 1953. Columbia Tristar, 1998. DVD. Jason and the Argonauts. Dir. Don Chaffey. Perf. Todd Armstrong and Nancy Kovack. Columbia Pictures, 1953. EXPLAIN: Instructor: Ellen Simpson Novotny, M.A. Name: ________________________________ (please print) Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 30 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II OPTIONAL RESOURCES IF YOU HAVE INTERNET ACCESS Purdue University maintains a primary website for writing topics, including videos: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/02/ purdue owl: mla formatting - the basics - youtube Re: Writing 3. A vast array of writing resources from the publisher of our textbooks. http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/rewriting2e You Tube hosts videos for EVERYTHING, including how to cite a source in MLA format, and interviews / speeches useful as sources for your final project. So – if you would rather listen than read, go for it. Remember – some videos are better quality than others. Search Pinterest for Writing Topics posters. AskAcademic - An online information service provided by participating academic libraries. Ask your questions anytime - 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (except holidays). www.askacademic.org/ Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 31 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 32 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II FINAL EXAM REVIEW Final Exam REVIEW Part 1 – Writing Thesis Statements Write an improved thesis statement for each of the prompts below. It must be a debatable idea. Use more specific and formal language. Use precise word choice. Be certain to include the criteria which would form the basis for your argument. 1. Music lyrics are always vibrant and lively. 2. Chewing tobacco should be banned. 3. Schools are falling apart. 4. Some laws are good. 5. What can we do about pollution? 6. We need environmental reform. 7. Bullying in schools is a problem. 8. “Get rich quick” is a common theme in tv shows. 9. Americans should exercise more. 10. Citizens need to work now to prevent a social security problem. * See 12 Methods for Writing a Thesis Statement * A thesis must not be worded as a question * Write the answer to a question you are trying to answer. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 33 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Final Exam REVIEW Part 2 – Using MLA In-Text Citations Revise each incorrect in-text citation using MLA format correctly. Original statement: “Critical thinking requires us to use our imagination, seeing things from perspectives other than our own and envisioning the likely consequences of our position.” Information: Authors: Sylvan Barnet and Hugo Bedau , Page: 10, Title: From Critical Thinking to Argument: A Portable Guide, Publication year: 2014. 1. Incorrect: From Critical Thinking to Argument: A Portable Guide (2011) claims “Critical thinking requires us to use our imaginations, seeing things from perspectives other than our own and envisioning the likely consequences of our position. “ (page 11). 2. Incorrect: Sylvan and Hugo insist that thinking requires imagination. 3. Incorrect: When practicing critical thinking, we are “seeing things from perspectives other than our own and envisioning the likely consequences of our position.” (11) 4. Incorrect: Barnet and Bedau (11) encourage critical thinkers to “face objections to our own beliefs” (2014). 5. Incorrect: “Critical thinking requires us to use our imagination, seeing things from perspectives other than our own and envisioning the likely consequences of our position.” (Sylvan and Hugo 11). Hints – Use your texts. The MLA section in each text and the study guide notes “Blending Quotes Smoothly Into Your Writing” will demonstrate correct use of quotation marks, final period, page number, parenthesis, signal phrase, author’s name. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 34 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Final Exam REVIEW Part 3 – Works Cited You may use textbooks or other references you have for this exercise. Using the information listed, create a Works Cited page using MLA style. REMEMBER TO: alphabetize, label, include a running header, and italicize. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ M.L. Snyder wrote the article "The effects of failure on subsequent performance" printed on pages 1685 - 1688 in the Journal of Psychology dated July 2014 as volume 211, issue 7. The article was accessed from the ASC Neilsen Library access to EBSCOhost on April 23, 2016, though it appeared exactly as the printed form. Sharon Begley and Debra Rosenberg wrote the article "The Latest Trouble with Racial Profiling" printed on page 8 Newsweek dated January 14, 2010 as volume 131, issue 3. The lecture titled "Debate over school funding intensifies on the hill" was presented on October 20, 2011 as part of the Teacher's Today Lecture Series at ASC Neilsen Library, Alamosa, CO. Frank Johnson was the speaker. Jane Smiley wrote the article "CSAP Math Test is Hard" printed on page 8A in the Denver Post dated Jan 29, 2012. The article was continued on page 18A. The same Jane Smiley, a Middle School Math Teacher, gave a personal interview on March 28, 2012. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 35 of 36 January 2015 ENG 102 – COMMUNICATION ARTS II Bev Bos wrote the book Before the Basics: Creating Conversations with Children which was published in 2002 in California by Cal Central Press. Spencer Noyce and Jennifer Parr wrote the article "Handling Kids With Love" printed in Baby Magazine dated November 2008. The article was posted on the Baby Magazine website at http://www.babymag.com on November 2010. It printed on Jan 10, 2011, from the website. The book Mapping the Human Genome, edited by Amy M. Cey, was printed in New York, New York by Random Publishing House in 2012. L. Strong, K. Wu, G. Po, and F. Nelson created and produced the self-help DVD "Choosing your child's gender" distributed March 2006 by PBS in Washington D.C. Gina Kolata wrote the article "$50,000 Offered to Tall, Smart Egg Donor" printed on pages 702703 in the fouth edition of Everything's An Argument by Andrea A. Lunsford, John J. Rusk, and Keith Walters and published by Bedford/St. Martin's in Boston, 2014. "Child Abuse Prevention Tips" is a link of the Parent's for Megan's Law website accessed April 23, 2010 at http://www.parentsformeganslaw.com. This article has no date and no author listed. Adams State University – Extended Studies© Page 36 of 36 January 2015

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