Assignment 3

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timer Asked: Jul 3rd, 2018
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Question description

[Please do not change/edit the file, only answer within the gray/grey areas]

like below

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MY COMMENTS: (GRAY/GREY AREA)

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Please and Thank You Very Much


ENGLISH 475 DIRECTED LEARNING ACTIVITY THE READING PROCESS OBJECTIVE: To understand and develop an effective reading process and apply it to current and future class assignments. LESSON: Type your responses in the parentheses below. What do you enjoy about reading? What do you dislike about reading? ( ) Describe what you do before, during, and after reading. ( ) ACTIVITY A Read and mark up the following information on the reading process. ● Put angle brackets < > around the main idea. ● Put asterisks * * around examples and other support. ● Comment on what you read. Type your comments in the parentheses below. EXAMPLE COMMENT: (AS I READ, I SHOULD MAKE NOTES ON THE PAGE. WHAT IDEAS ARE IMPORTANT?) The Reading Process Reading is an ongoing process of taking in, understanding, and remembering information. Breaking the reading process down into three stages is an effective way to get more out of your reading time. Now you might be saying, “A three step process takes too much time. Isn’t it faster to just read?” Well, a good reading plan makes learning easier and will save you time in the long run. MY COMMENTS: ( ) In the before reading stage, ask yourself, “What do I already know about the topic? What do I want to know?” This will help you better take in the new information. Before Reading ● Read the title. ● Read headings and subheadings. ● Ask questions. ● Read bold-faced words. ● Look at pictures. ● Create a purpose for reading! MY COMMENTS: ( ) During reading, stay active by questioning what you read and imagining you are having a conversation with the author. You will also be looking for answers to your questions as you read. This will help you improve your understanding. During Reading ● Make notes on the text. ● Find the main idea. ● Find major details. ● Look for answers to your questions. ● Agree or disagree with the author. ● Read it again if part of the text does not make sense. ● Read to learn! MY COMMENTS: ( ) After reading, review and think about what you just read. This will help you remember and use what you have read. After Reading ● Review information. ● Quiz yourself to better remember. ● Talk about what you have read. ● Write down your thoughts. ● Use the information so you will remember it! MY COMMENTS: ( ) ACTIVITY B See the textbook selection below entitled “It’s Critical” and answer the questions before, during, and after reading the selection. Before Reading What are the textbook features that will help you create a purpose for reading “It’s Critical” (Title, Headings, etc.)? ( ) What do you know about the topic? ( ) What questions do you have about the topic? ( ) What is your purpose for reading “It’s Critical?” ( ) During Reading Now read and mark up “It’s Critical.” ● Put angle brackets < > around the main idea. ● Put asterisks * * around examples and other support. ● Comment on and ask questions about what you read. 3.2 It’s Critical LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1. Understand what critical thinking is and why it’s important. Americans Have Access to… ● 1 million new books each year ● 5,500 magazines ● 10,500 radio stations ● 65,000 iPhone apps ● 1,000,000,000,000 Web pages In today’s environment, it is not so critical to “know” a great deal of information. The list above indicates how much information we can easily access. In fact, the abundance of information might be the greater challenge. Your success will depend on what you can do with the information, not just on what you know. How we filter and use that abundance of data is the reason critical thinking has become so important today. Critical thinking is the ability to discover the value of an idea, a set of beliefs, a claim, or an argument. It requires you to use logic and reasoning to evaluate evidence or information to make a decision or reach a conclusion. Critical thinking is ● a foundation for effective communication, ● the principal skill used in effective decision making, ● at the core of creating new knowledge, ● a way to uncover bias and prejudices. Critical thinking is a part of everyday life, too. Decisions you make can have a lasting impact on your life, and these decisions benefit from critical thinking. Did you ever decide to quit smoking or to lose weight? Were you successful? How did you decide to attend the college you are in? Was that the right choice for you? In any of these cases, could you have made a better decision if you had better or more information? MY COMMENTS AND QUESTIONS: ( ) The Critical Thinking Process The critical thinking process is really nothing more than asking the right questions to understand a problem or issue and then gathering the data you need to complete the decision or take sides on an issue. What is the problem or issue I am considering really about? Understanding this is key to successful critical thinking. What is the objective? A position? A decision? Are you deciding what candidate in an election will do a better overall job, or are you looking to strengthen the political support for a particular cause? Are you really against a recommendation from your dad, or are you using the issue to establish your independence? Do you understand the terms related to the issue? Are you in agreement with the proponent’s definitions? For example, if you are evaluating a quotation on the health-care system for use in a paper, your objective might be to decide to use the quotation or not, but before you can make that decision you need to understand what the writer is really saying. If a term like “family” is used, for example, does it mean direct relations or extended family? MY COMMENTS AND QUESTIONS: ( ) What are my options? What are choices that are available to you (if you are making a decision), or what are the “sides” (in the case of a position) you might choose to agree with? What are their differences? What are the likely consequences of each option? In making a decision, it might be helpful to ask yourself, “What is the worst thing that might happen in each scenario?” Examining different points of view is very important; there may be dozens of alternative viewpoints to a particular issue—and the validity of each can change depending on circumstances. A position that is popular or politically correct today may not have been a year ago, and there is no guarantee it will be right in the future. Likewise, a solution to a personal problem that was successful for your roommate may not apply to you. Remember also that sometimes the best option might be a combination of the options you identify initially. What do I know about each option? First, make sure you have all the information about each option. Do you have all the information to support each of your likely options? What is still missing? Where can you get the information you need? Keep an open mind and don’t dismiss supporting information on any position before you evaluate it carefully. MY COMMENTS AND QUESTIONS: ( ) How good is my information? Now it’s time to evaluate the quality of the support of each option or point of view. Evaluate the strengths and the weaknesses of each piece of supporting evidence. Are all the relevant facts presented? Are some facts presented in misleading ways? Are enough examples presented to support the premise? Consider the source of the supporting information. Who is the expert presenting the facts? That “expert” may have a vested interest in the position. Consider that bias, more for understanding the point of view than for rejecting it. Consider your own opinions (especially when working with emotional issues); are your emotional ties to a point of view getting in your way of clear thinking (your own biases)? If you really like a particular car model, are you giving the financial implications of buying that car a fair consideration? Are there any errors or fallacies in your logic? Saylor Foundation. College Success. http://www.saylor.org/site/textbooks/College%20Success.pdf MY COMMENTS AND QUESTIONS: ( ) What important information did you find? ( ) What answers did you find to your questions? ( ) What new questions do you have? ( ) After Reading Think of different ways this text can be used in your personal life and as a student. ( ) ACTIVITY C Imagine you are talking with a classmate who is overwhelmed by the amount of reading for your class. Your classmate remarks, “Twenty pages is a lot to read. I don’t know where to start! How am I going to remember all of this information?” What advice would you give to make the reading more manageable for the student? What should he or she do before reading? ( ) What should he or she do during reading? ( ) What should he or she do after reading? ( ) CONCLUDING THOUGHTS. . . What did you learn from this DLA that you can apply to future English assignments and/or other classes? ( ) REVIEW: Once you have completed this exercise, post it to the appropriate drop box. If you need help with posting, watch the video “Submitting a DLA to the COW.” In 1-5 days, a tutor will give you feedback on your DLA. To view the tutor’s response, click on Grades in the Administration box and then on the drop box that you submitted your DLA to. Be prepared to use this DLA experience to contribute to future class discussions about reading and writing, and keep this activity in mind as you select other DLAs, workshops, or learning groups.

Tutor Answer

tutoraxel
School: UT Austin

please find the responses attached

ENGLISH 475
DIRECTED LEARNING ACTIVITY
THE READING PROCESS
OBJECTIVE: To understand and develop an effective reading process and apply it to current
and future class assignments.
LESSON: Type your responses in the parentheses below.
What do you enjoy about reading? What do you dislike about reading?
(I enjoy reading to increase my knowledge. I dislike reading long texts. )
Describe what you do before, during, and after reading.
(Before reading, I skim through the text to get an overview 0f the content. During reading, I
concentrate my thoughts on the reading text and I always reflect on the reading after finishing)
ACTIVITY A
Read and mark up the following information on the reading process.
● Put angle brackets < > around the main idea.
● Put asterisks * * around examples and other support.
● Comment on what you read. Type your comments in the parentheses below.
EXAMPLE COMMENT: (AS I READ, I SHOULD MAKE NOTES ON THE PAGE. WHAT
IDEAS ARE IMPORTANT?)
The Reading Process
Reading is an ongoing process of taking in, understanding, and remembering information.
Breaking the reading process down into three stages is an effective way to get more out of your
reading time. Now you might be saying, “A three step process takes too much time. Isn’t it
faster to just read?” Well, a good reading plan makes learning easier and will save you time in
the long run.
MY COMMENTS: (Breaking down a reading text makes it easy to read a large text by tackling
subtopics within the text)

In the before reading stage, ask yourself, “What do I already know about the topic?
What do I want to know?” This will help you better take in the new information.
Before Reading
● Read the title.
● Read headings and subheadings.
● Ask questions.
● Read bold-faced words.
● Look at pictures.
● Create a purpose for reading!
MY COMMENTS: (Preparations before the reading process is good because it makes one to
grasp the reading text effectively)
During reading, stay active by questioning what you read and imagining you are having
a conversation with the author. You will also be looking for answers to your questions as you
read. This will help you improve your understanding.
During Reading
● Make notes on the text.
● Find the main idea.
● Find major det...

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Anonymous
Excellent job

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