Annotated Bibliography Essay

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Prompt: The goals of this assignment are fairly simple. First, you will gain experience with the annotated bibliography genre. It’s likely that you’ll be asked to write annotated bibliographies in other classes, so it’s a good thing to get some practice now.

Second, you will reflect on the rhetoric and content of sources you discovered in your research so far. You can use these sources for your final researched proposal essay, so writing this annotated bibliography should help you to consider which sources were most useful.

Your annotated bibliography will need to include a total of seven sources. You will need a minimum of two scholarly sources (ex. articles published in academic journals, book chapters etc.) Your remaining sources can be popular, like magazines and newspaper articles. Your annotated bibliography should also include a variety of primary and secondary sources. You may include only two sources from your research proposal in your annotated bibliography.(I can send it if you need). Also here two good resources: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/cgi/viewcont...
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/James_Engleha...

Each annotation must include the following:

  1. Annotation: MLA style
  2. Summary: Provide a brief (3-5 sentences) summary of the source, covering the mainpoints of the work. Consider the following: Who is the author of this work? What ishis/her underlying claim/ point of view on the issue?
  3. Evaluation: Provide a brief (3-5 sentences) evaluation of the source, explaining how itwill be used in your final research paper. Consider the following: how did this source deepen or strengthen your understanding of the topic? What parts of it were most helpful/insightful?

Writing Project #2 Annotated Bibliography Total Points: 200 Due: Friday, July 6th Draft must include stamp from Center for Excellence in Writing Prompt: The goals of this assignment are fairly simple. First, you will gain experience with the annotated bibliography genre. It’s likely that you’ll be asked to write annotated bibliographies in other classes, so it’s a good thing to get some practice now. Second, you will reflect on the rhetoric and content of sources you discovered in your research so far. You can use these sources for your final researched proposal essay, so writing this annotated bibliography should help you to consider which sources were most useful. Your annotated bibliography will need to include a total of seven sources. You will need a minimum of two scholarly sources (ex. articles published in academic journals, book chapters etc.) Your remaining sources can be popular, like magazines and newspaper articles. Your annotated bibliography should also include a variety of primary and secondary sources. You may include only two sources from your research proposal in your annotated bibliography. Each annotation must include the following: 1. Annotation: MLA style 2. Summary: Provide a brief (3-5 sentences) summary of the source, covering the main points of the work. Consider the following: Who is the author of this work? What is his/her underlying claim/ point of view on the issue? 3. Evaluation: Provide a brief (3-5 sentences) evaluation of the source, explaining how it will be used in your final research paper. Consider the following: how did this source deepen or strengthen your understanding of the topic? What parts of it were most helpful/insightful? Sample MLA annotation: Baggaley, Kate. “Pythons Are Invading Florida. Meet the Scientists Fighting Back.” Popular Science, 13 Oct. 2017, www.popsci.com/florida-invasive-pythons. This article by Popular Science describes different ways in which scientists are trying to combat the python problem in south Florida, including tracking male snakes and using pheromones as bait. The article also provides an excellent overview as to why the problem continues to persist explaining that pythons are difficult to spot and that they procreate at an incredibly fast-pace. It also emphasizes what’s at stake and what will happen if the population of pythons continues to increase in south Florida. Overall, this article helped me better understand why we haven’t been able to eradicate the python population in South Florida, more specifically in the Everglades. Although the article praises efforts made by scientists to capture snakes (like the Judas method) it undermines efforts made by others like the python-hunting program. In my research paper, I am proposing that the Python Elimination Program should be extended and that the bounty for capturing snakes should be increased. I will use some statistics provided in this article to show that the python elimination program is much more affordable and effective when compared to other available measures. Format: Your annotated bibliography should follow all MLA guidelines, including a title, heading, double-spaced, 1-inch margins, 12 point Times New Roman font, and proper pagination. In addition to following the general MLA format guidelines, your annotated bibliography must also adhere to the following rules: v Alphabetized: The annotated bibliography entries are alphabetized according to citation – names of authors or books, or the words that begin each entry – just as a works cited page is. v Double-spaced: Your entries, summaries included, are double-spaced throughout. v Indented: Please keep in mind that all your text, including the write-up beneath the citation, must be indented so that the author's last name is the only text that is flush left. v Commas are used instead of periods between Publisher, Publication Date, and Pagination. v Medium is no longer necessary. v Containers are now a part of the MLA process, in light of technology. Periods should be used between Containers. v DOIs should be used instead of URLS when available. v Use the phrase, “Accessed” instead of listing the date or the abbreviation, “n.d.”
Last name !1 First name Last name Professor Dabek ENC 1102 day month year Annotated Bibliography Falcón, Wilfredo, et al. "Biology and Impacts of Pacific Island Invasive Species. 10. Iguana Iguana, the Green Iguana (Squamata: Iguanidae)." Pacific Science, vol. 67, no. 2, Apr. 2013, pp. 157-186. EBSCOhost, doi:10.2984/67.2 This scientific scholarly article provides a detailed description regarding the average size, eating habits, and reproduction rates of green iguanas. The source also explains the damaging effects that green iguanas can have on their surroundings, including digging up power lines and destroying gardens. Although the article focuses on green iguanas found around the Pacific islands, it also mentions South Florida and Puerto Rico. The article listed some useful facts and statistics about green iguanas. This source gave me a better understanding of how other countries around the world are trying to deal with this invasive species. As for the application for my final paper, I can see myself using this source for background information and to explain how this species has invaded other regions. Magill, Ron. “Hour 3: Kenny G.” The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz, 30 Jan. 2018, itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/hour-3-kenny-g/id934820588?i=1000401078336&mt=2. This source is a radio interview of Ron Magill, a wildlife expert and the Director of Zoo Miami. In the interview, Magill provides some tips and suggestions as to what Miami-Dade residents can do when they encounter green iguanas on their property. Magill also answered questions from callers who were scared to handle these animals. This primary and popular source is useful for a variety of reasons. First, Ron Magill is a very well-respected and knowledgeable wildlife expert from South Florida, so his views on the green iguana will lend credibility to my final paper. Secondly, this source demonstrates the severity of the issue. The fact that several callers phoned in to the station to ask questions about green iguanas demonstrates what I originally suggested, that the general public is misinformed when it comes to this species. Last name !2 Townsend, Josiah H., et al. “Predation of a Tree Snail Drymaeus Multilineatus (Gastropoda: Bulimulidae) by Iguana Iguana (Reptilia: Iguanidae) on Key Biscayne, Florida.” Southeastern Naturalist, vol. 4, no. 2, 2005, pp. 361–364., doi 10.1656/1528-7092(2005)004[0361:poatsd]2.0.co;2. This source, a scholarly scientific article published in a peer-reviewed journal, describes the impact that invasive species like green iguanas have on their environment and on the surrounding native species. The piece focuses primarily on the population of green iguanas in Key Biscayne and South Florida and the impact that they are having on the tree snails. The authors of this article, field scientists who study herbivores, have come to the conclusion that green iguanas living in Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park have the potential of drastically reducing, if not eradicating, the population of tree snails. This group of scientists discovered that green iguanas in Southern Florida may have the potential to put additional pressure on other species of tree snails whose distributions are restricted to the southern Florida mainland. I found this article to be enlightening because I did not know that green iguanas ate anything other than plants. Moreover, I did not think that green iguanas had the potential of throwing off the food-chain and ecological composition of South Florida. I will use this article to highlight the severity of the issue and to argue that a solution needs to be found immediately. Willingham , AJ. “The Cold Is Causing Frozen Iguanas to Fall from Trees in Florida.” CNN.com, 6 Jan. 2018, edition.cnn.com/2018/01/05/weather/iguana-cold-florida-bomb-cyclone.html This news story explains an interesting phenomenon that happens in the winter months in South Florida. As the reporter explains, Miami residents grow concerned when they come across iguanas that appear to be frozen in their yards in the colder months of December and January. The reporter goes on to explain that what is actually happening is that the iguanas go into temporary shock due to the sudden drop in weather. The article suggests that residents do not attempt to move or relocate the frozen iguanas because once the temperature rises they will be back to their normal. This news story is useful for my argument because it demonstrates how overall Miami residents lack education about the green iguanas. I can see myself using this source to elaborate on my solution in my final paper. I will argue that in their workshops, the FWC should also address what people should do if they come across an immobilized iguana in the colder months in south florida.
Primary vs. Secondary Sources Your instructors may require you to use more primary sources than secondary sources for your research. Discover the identifying characteristics and advantages of primary and secondary (and tertiary) sources with this guide. Primary Sources Primary sources are uninterpreted, original, or new materials—e.g. an activist gave a speech, a scientist conducted original research, a student drew original conclusions from others’ works, an artist created a piece of artwork, or your grandmother wrote an autobiography. Primary sources are first-hand and not interpreted by anyone else, they offer a personal point of view, and are created by a witnesses of, or participants in, an event (except in cases of historical research written after the fact). Researchers also create primary sources. Questions to Ask When Determining If Something Is a Primary Source:      Did the author conduct original research on the topic? Is the information the result of a survey? Is the information uninterpreted data or statistics? Is the source an original document or a creative work? Did the information come from personal experience? Why Use Primary Sources? Sources that present new research, original conclusions based on the research of others, or an author's original perspective are more helpful and effective for your needs. They allow you to interpret the information rather than relying on the interpretations of others. This is why your instructors may require you to seek out original research for your assignments. Note: Keep in mind that because primary sources reflect the true meanings and ideas put forth by authors, the information itself may not be completely objective, well-reasoned, or accurate. Examples:        Scholarly journal article that reports new research and findings Newspaper/magazine articles written soon after the event/fact Court records Translation/excerpt of an original document Art or music Autobiographies Manuscripts      Correspondence, letters Speeches Interviews Data from a research study Websites Secondary Sources Secondary sources are information sources that interpret, include, describe, or draw conclusions based on works written by others. Secondary sources are used by authors to present evidence, back up arguments and statements, or help represent an opinion by using and citing multiple sources. Secondary sources are often referred to as being “one step removed” from the actual occurrence or fact. Questions to Ask When Determining If Something Is a Secondary Source:      Did the author consult multiple sources to create this work? Is this information an interpretation or paraphrasing of another author's work? Did the information come from second-hand reporting? Is the source a textbook, review, or commentary? Does the source include quotations or images? Why Use Secondary Sources? Secondary sources are best for uncovering background or historical information about a topic and broadening your understanding of a topic by exposing you to others’ perspectives, interpretations, and conclusions. However, it is better to critique an original information source (primary source) if you plan to reference it in your work. Examples            Most books (including textbooks) Documentary movies Art, book, movie, and theater reviews Analysis of a clinical trial Newspaper/magazine articles written as historical, opinionated, or reflective accounts Commentaries Biographies Dictionaries, encyclopedias Websites (also primary) A research paper written by you Literature reviews and meta-analyses Note: Many times literature reviews and meta-analyses make up part of a peer-reviewed journal article. If the article includes new data or draws new conclusions, remember that overall it is a primary source. Tertiary Sources Tertiary sources consist of information which is a distillation and collection of primary and secondary sources - they provide overviews of topics by compiling and synthesizing information gathered from other resources. Why Use Tertiary Sources? Tertiary sources are convenient and easy-to-use; they are great resources to use as introductions to a new topic. Examples          Almanacs Bibliographies Dictionaries, encyclopedias (also secondary) Handbooks Fact books Guide books Indexes, abstracts, bibliographies used to locate primary and secondary sources Manuals Textbooks (also secondary) Comparison of Similar Sources Primary Secondary Tertiary Statistical table of public school teachers' salaries in Minnesota. Article describing trends in Minnesota teachers' salaries. Index of sources for finding statistical information. A reproduction of the Declaration of Independence. Book exploring the history and political thought behind the Declaration of Independence. Almanac explaining documents, symbols, and anthems of the United States. Speech by well-known business leader. Biography of business leader. Textbook on human resources management. Physical evidence in a court trial. Lawyer’s closing remarks/argument. Dictionary of criminal justice. Results of a treatment trial testing a new antidepressant on elderly men. Book about treating depression with changes in diet and exercise. Blockbuster movie filmed in 1988. Biography of the lead actor. Manual with practical tips for working with elderly patients with depression. Guide about the movie. Original artwork, perhaps a sculpture. Critique of that sculpture. Encyclopedia about 19th Century sculpture. Notes taken by clinical psychologist. Magazine article about the psychological condition. Textbook on clinical psychology. Last updated February ‘13 / JL
Popular vs. Scholarly Articles - Guide The University of Arizona Library Popular vs. Scholarly Articles - Guide What is the difference between popular and scholarly articles? Popular Articles (Magazines) • • • • • Are often written by journalists or professional writers for a general audience Use language easily understood by general readers Rarely give full citations for sources Written for the general public Tend to be shorter than journal articles Examples of Popular Magazines: Scholarly Articles (Journals) • • • • • • Are written by and for faculty, researchers or scholars (chemists, historians, doctors, artists, etc.) Uses scholarly or technical language Tend to be longer articles about research Include full citations for sources Are often refereed or peer reviewed (articles are reviewed by an editor and other specialists before being accepted for publication) Book reviews and editorials are not considered scholarly articles, even when found in scholarly journals Examples of Scholarly Journals: Some points to remember: • • • Both magazine and journal articles can be good sources for your work. When selecting articles, think about how you intend to use the information: o Do you want background on a topic new to you? (use magazines) o Did your teacher say to cite scholarly resources? (use journals) Often a combination of the two will be most appropriate for undergraduate research. popular-vs-scholarly-guide.pdf, 9.7.2005
Journal entry #4: Complete the following chart for EACH of your seven sources 1. Title of source: 2. Type of source a) Primary or secondary b) Popular or scholarly 3. Authors(s) a) Full name b) Credentials (ex. PhD, MD, etc.) c) Author’s expertise or experience with the topic 4. Date of publication 5. Content a) What did you learn from reading this source?

Tutor Answer

henryprofessor
School: New York University

I will proceed once you provide your research proposal.
Attached.

Surname 1
Name
Professor
Course
Date
Annotated Bibliography
Barrett, Stoyan, and Rob White. "Disrupting environmental crime at the local level: An
operational perspective." Palgrave Communications 3.1 (2017): 2.
In this article, Barrett and White performed a case study analysis of the method for combating
the illegal dumping of waste materials in North East England. The author noted that the
disruption of the processes that are used for the commission of environmental crimes remains the
most effective approach for achieving the inter-agency cooperation for enforcement. They
concluded that the efforts of individual law enforcement agencies have limited impacts on the
crimes in the ways the multi-agency have on the desire of authorities to end the crime.
An assessment of the content of this article revealed various strategies that can be used by
law enforcement agency for implementing multi-agency strategies that result in the expected
outcomes in environmental crime prevention. As a publication by two of the leading climate
change justice experts in the world, the insights and knowledge shared in this article would be
useful for expanding the claims made in the proposed research paper. Finally, the material would
also provide evidence to support the arguments for supporting the arguments regarding the value
of public awareness in the prevention of illegal waste dumping in Miami.

Surname 2
Englehardt, James D., et al. "Solid waste management health and safety risks:
Epidemiology and assessment to support risk reduction." Gainesville, FL: Florida
Center for Solid and Hazardous Waste Management, Report# 00-01(2000): 1-343.
Englehardt, James wrote that the “results of the overall study indicated high rates of mortality,
injury, and disease among municipal solid waste collectors with the actual numbers of injuries
were found to be an order of magnitude higher than the number of workers’ compensation
claims.” They further noted that the training and education of the crews would reduce the
incidence of skin conditions and other related diseases to MSW in the field. Also, public
education is considered an additional safety measure for avoiding the negative consequences of
indiscriminate dispo...

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