Humanities
ENG106 Grand Canyon University Exchange of Human Organs Legalized Essay

eng106

Grand Canyon University

Question Description

Definition Argument Essay Assignment

Goal

Write a 1,500-1,750-word essay using five to seven academic resources in which you argue that a contested “case” involving the sale, trade, or donation of human organs fits (or does not fit) within a given category. A case may include a specific news article, story, or incident illustrating a dilemma or controversy relating to the exchange of human organs. The case does not need to be a court case.

Directions


Follow these steps when composing your essay:

1.Start by selecting a controversial case found in the media involving the sale, trade, or donation of human organs. For example, an appropriate case might include a story in the news about an organ broker, and the term to define might be “criminal.”

2.Decide what category you think your case belongs in, with the understanding that others may disagree with you about the definition of your category, and/or whether your chosen case matches your category.

3.In the opening of your essay, introduce the case you will examine and pose your definition question. Do not simply summarize here. Instead, introduce the issue and offer context.

4.To support your argument, define the boundaries of your category (criteria) by using a commonly used definition or by developing your own extended definition. Defining your boundaries simply means naming the criteria by which you will discuss your chosen case involving the sale, trade, or donation of human organs. If you determine, for example, that an organ broker is a criminal, what criteria constitute this? A criminal may intentionally harm others, which could be one of your criteria.

5.In the second part of your argument (the match), show how your case meets (or does not meet) your definition criteria. Perhaps by comparing or sizing up your controversial case to other cases can help you to develop your argument.

This essay is NOT simply a persuasive essay on the sale, trade, or donation of human organs. It is an argumentative essay where the writer explains what a term means and uses a specific case to explore the meaning of that term in depth.

First Draft Grading

You will receive completion points for the first draft based upon the successful submission of a complete draft.

Because your first draft is a completion grade, do not assume that this grade reflects or predicts the final grade. If you do not consider your instructor’s comments, you may be deducted points on your final draft.

Final Draft Grading

The essay will be graded using a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations.

Sources

Include in-text citations and a references page in GCU Style for FIVE to SEVEN scholarly sources outside of class texts.

These sources should be used to support any claims you make and should be present in the text of the essay.

Use the GCU Library to help you find sources.

Include this research in the paper in a scholarly manner.

Format

Prepare this assignment according to the guidelines found in the GCU Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

ENG-106 Rubric: Definition Argument Criteria % Value % Scaling 1: Unsatisfactory 2: Less Than Satisfactory 3: Satisfactory 4: Good 5: Excellent 0% 65% 75% 85% 100% Does not have title, and has missing or indiscernible thesis statement and minimal evidence to support main ideas. Argument includes elements of reasoning by definition, but does not center on a definition argument. Student does not use outside sources. Title may not suggest subject and does not spark interest. Thesis statement and/or the controlling idea are not clearly stated. Argument includes elements of a definitional argument, but does not use strategies (especially the criteria-match structure) very well. Ideas are underdeveloped and clichéd. They do not support the thesis. Evidence from outside sources can be irrelevant. Title suggests subject but does not necessarily spark interest. Thesis statement clearly identifies the main point the author is trying to make. Argument centers specifically on a definitional argument and uses strategies that support it, including matching criteria for definition arguments. Most of the content supports thesis, and cited evidence usually justifies ideas. Title suggests subject and sparks interest. With a clear, controlling idea, thesis statement effectively identifies the main point the student is trying to make. Content supports thesis well. Argument centers specifically on a definitional argument and effectively uses strategies that support it, including matching criteria for definition arguments Specific, cited evidence justifies ideas and enriches the essay. Content & Ideas – 40% Definition Argument Content and Ideas Should: Include an effective title. Provide a thesis that centers specifically on an argument of definition. Establish clear criteria related to the definition in question. Match one or more cases to the established criteria. Use evidence appropriate for definitional arguments. 40% Title suggests subject but does not spark interest. Thesis statement identifies the main point the author is trying to make. Most of content relates to thesis statement, but lacks sufficient support through appropriate strategies. Argument centers specifically on a definitional argument, but may not effectively uses strategies that support it, including matching criteria for definition arguments Cited evidence sometimes does not justify ideas. Organization – 12% © 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. Organization 12% No apparent organization present. Ineffective introduction does not invite readers or explain the subject. The reader cannot find the thesis statement. Underdeveloped paragraphs lack focus and topic sentences. No conclusion present. No apparent organization present. Introduction explains subject, but does not engage readers. Thesis is difficult to find. Underdeveloped paragraphs lack focus and topic sentences. Weak conclusion offered. Organization is clear, but with minor errors. Introduction explains subject, but does not adequately engage readers. Thesis may be misplaced. Paragraphs are not developed around topic sentences, and may not always advance essay's ideas. Conclusion summarizes but does not conclude. Organization aids readers in understanding content. Introduction explains subject, but may not engage readers. Thesis statement is placed appropriately, according to the genre set forth in the assignment description in the syllabus. Wellordered paragraphs are developed around topic sentences, and advance essay's ideas. Conclusion may be more of a summary. Logically organized to lead readers to understanding content. Introduction explains subject and engages readers. Thesis statement is placed appropriately, according to the genre set forth in the assignment description in the syllabus. Wellordered paragraphs are developed around topic sentences, and advance essay's ideas. Conclusion provides strong, satisfying ending, not a mere summary of the essay. Essay lacks ONE of the following: double-spaced, 12 pt. Times New Roman font, 1inch margins, heading (with name, course, date, and instructor), assignment title, and page numbers using appropriate header function. All information, paraphrases, quotations, and Layout: Essay is double-spaced with 12 pt. Times New Roman font, 1inch margins, heading (with name, course, date, and instructor), assignment title, and page numbers using appropriate header function. All information, paraphrases, quotations, and borrowed ideas are cited in parenthetical GCU format; all Format – 16% Paper Format 16% Layout: Essay lacks more than THREE of the following: double-spaced, 12 pt, Times New Roman font, 1inch margins, heading (with name, course, date, and instructor), assignment title, and page numbers using appropriate header function. Not all information, paraphrases, quotations, and borrowed ideas are cited on the page they appear; little or no Layout: Essay lacks THREE of the following: doublespaced, 12 pt. Times New Roman font, 1inch margins, heading (with name, course, date, and instructor), assignment title, and page numbers using appropriate header function. Not all information, paraphrases, quotations, and borrowed ideas are cited on the page they Layout: Essay lacks TWO of the following: doublespaced, 12 pt. Times New Roman font, 1 inch margins, heading (with name, course, date, and instructor), assignment title, and page numbers using appropriate header function. Not all information, paraphrases, quotations, and borrowed ideas are cited on the page they appear; missing one intext citation and/or reference entry; minor © 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. in-text citations and/or entries on reference page used; major documentation oversights noted; major format errors and omissions noted; inappropriate number of required sources used. appear; missing more than one citation and/or reference entry; significant documentation oversights noted; significant format errors or omissions noted; inappropriate number of required sources used. documentation oversights noted; minor formatting errors or omissions noted; appropriate number of required sources are used. borrowed ideas are cited on the page that they appear and are listed on the references page (GCU format); some minor errors or omissions in format noted; appropriate number of required sources is used. sources are listed on the references page (GCU format); all citations and reference entries are complete and in alphabetical order; appropriate number of required sources is used. Voice & tone usually characterize ideas effectively create appropriate mood. Word choice usually includes current standard usage, active verbs, concrete nouns, and precise words. Some slang or jargon exists in the paper. Some variety of sentence structures strengthens the ideas, creates vitality, and avoids choppiness in the writing. Writing is mostly concisely written. Voice & tone characterize ideas and effectively create appropriate mood. Word choice includes current standard usage, active verbs, concrete nouns, and precise words. Sentence structures strengthen the ideas, create vitality, and avoid choppiness in the writing. Writing is concise. Language & Style – 16% Language & Style 16% Voice & tone are inappropriate and ineffective in creating appropriate mood. Inappropriate word choice used. Sentence structure includes ungrammatical structures and no variety. Writing is wordy. Voice & tone are inappropriate and ineffective in creating appropriate mood. Word choice fails in use of appropriate, precise language and strong verbs. Includes too many to be verbs. No attempt to vary sentence structure noted. Writing is wordy. Voice & tone usually do not characterize ideas appropriately or effectively create appropriate mood. Word choice includes nonstandard outdated usage, too many to be verbs, is not precise, and is occasionally incorrect. Some slang or jargon exists in the paper. Inadequate variety in sentence structure noted. Writing is wordy. Grammar & Mechanics – 16% Grammar & Mechanics 16% Demonstrates no control of grammar, spelling, & Demonstrates minimal control of grammar, Demonstrates reasonable control of grammar, © 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. Demonstrates high control of grammar, Demonstrates outstanding control of punctuation conventions. Many errors, such as: Apostrophe use Capitalization Commas misplaced or missing Parallelism Faulty point of view shifts Pronoun agreement Quotation errors Semicolons misused Run-ons & fragments Spelling errors Subject-verb agreement Tense shifts spelling, & punctuation conventions. Several errors, such as: Apostrophe use Capitalization Commas misplaced or missing Parallelism Faulty point of view shifts Pronoun agreement Quotation errors Semicolons misused Run-ons & fragments Spelling errors Subject-verb agreement Tense shifts spelling, & punctuation conventions. Some errors, such as: Apostrophe use Capitalization Commas misplaced or missing Parallelism Faulty point of view shifts Pronoun agreement Quotation errors Semicolons misused Run-ons & fragments Spelling errors Subject-verb agreement Tense shifts © 2015. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. spelling, & punctuation conventions. Few errors, such as: Apostrophe use Capitalization Commas misplaced or missing Parallelism Faulty point of view shifts Pronoun agreement Quotation errors Semicolons misused Run-ons & fragments Spelling errors Subject-verb agreement Tense shifts grammar, spelling, & punctuation conventions. No errors, such as: Apostrophe use Capitalization Commas misplaced or missing Parallelism Faulty point of view shifts Pronoun agreement Quotation errors Semicolons misused Run-ons & fragments Spelling errors Subject-verb agreement Tense shifts 1 Formatting: This is an electronic template for papers written in GCU style. The purpose of the template is to help you follow the basic writing expectations for beginning your coursework at GCU. Margins are set at 1 inch for top, bottom, left, and right. The first line of each paragraph is indented a half inch (0.5"). The line spacing is double throughout the paper, even on the reference page. Use one space after punctuation at the end of a sentence. The font style used in this template is Times New Roman. The font size is 12. When you are ready to write, and after having read these instructions completely, you can delete these directions and start typing. The paragraph formatting should stay the same. If you have any questions, please consult with your instructor. Citations: Citations are used to reference material from another source. When paraphrasing material from another source (such as a books, journals, website articles, etc.), include the author’s last name and the publication year in parentheses. When directly quoting material word-for-word from another source, use quotation marks and include the page number after the author’s last name and year. Using citations to give credit to others whose ideas or words you have used is an essential requirement to avoid issues of plagiarism. Just as you would never steal someone else’s car, you should not steal their words either. To avoid potential problems, always be sure to cite your sources by referring to the author’s last name and the year of publication in parentheses at the 2 end of the sentence, such as (Daresh, 2004) and page numbers if you are using word-for-word materials, such as “There are no simple strategies for accomplishing successful transitions, but we do know a great deal about how to get off to a good start” (King & Blumer, 2000, p. 356). The reference list should appear at the end of a paper (see the next page). It provides the information necessary for a reader to locate and retrieve any source you cite in the body of the paper. Each source you cite in the paper must appear in your reference list; likewise, each entry in the reference list must be cited in your text. Reference notes are formatted using a hanging indent of a half inch (0.5"). A sample reference page is included below; this page includes examples of how to format different reference types—books (Black & English, 1986), journal articles (Arnold & Dodge, 1994), website articles ("Seventeen Moments," n.d.), and GCU course lectures ("Lecture 1," 2013). 3 References Arnold, J. B., & Dodge, H. W. (1994). Room for all. The American School Board Journal, 181(10), 22-26. Black, J. A., & English, F. W. (1986). What they don’t tell you in schools of education about school administration. Lancaster, PA: Technomic. Daresh, J. C. (2004). Beginning the assistant principalship: A practical guide for new school administrators. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin. King, M., & Blumer, I. (2000). A good start. Phi Delta Kappan, 81(5), 356-360. Lecture 1. (2013). UNV-103: University Success. Phoenix, AZ: Grand Canyon University. Seventeen moments in Soviet history. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://soviethistory.org/index.php? action=L2&SubjectID=1929collectivization&Year=1929 ...
Purchase answer to see full attachment

Final Answer

Hello the paper is done.Am looking forward to work with you.

Surname 1
Name
Course code
Date
Instructor’s name
Should Organ Trade be legalized?
It has been observed that “demand for life-saving organ transplantation has so outpaced
supply that waiting patients and transplant teams are desperate” (Friedman, 2006, p.746). It has
been one of how the organ trade has not been able to meet the demand of the people in need,
coupled with a higher survival rate among the human beings. Interestingly, there have been some
strides that have been made such as ‘presumed consent’ and the voluntary altruism in which the
people are allowed to donate organs for the people who need them. The analysis of the essay will
follow an article written by ‘The Atlantic’ which argues that legalization of the organs would
help reduce violence and most importantly, save lives. A look at the people who are involved in
the donation of semen, blood, and even eggs shows that they are often compensated for their
services, which leads the article to question why the same threshold cannot be applied for the
organ transplants.
According to the World Health Organization, the organ transplant is explained as “the
removal of organs from the bodies of donating persons” (Shimazono, 2007, p.959). It implies
that there is a form of detachment in which the implied human dignity, which allows an
individual to be treated as a whole is violated. While there have been cases in which all this has
been done under the legal guidelines, such as in Iran, the article raises an issue which has
received diverging views from different scholars. Should the donor transplant be legalized? It is

Surname 2
a debate that has its merits and demerits, but one of the prevailing ideas is that this should not be
an issue which should be left to the political or medical class because the effect mainly lies on
the people involved in the transaction.
History has been cited as one that shows illegalizing of any trade only serves to take it
underground. It i...

University of Maryland

Anonymous
The tutor was pretty knowledgeable, efficient and polite. Great service!

Anonymous
Heard about Studypool for a while and finally tried it. Glad I did caus this was really helpful.

Anonymous
Just what I needed… fantastic!

Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4
Similar Questions
Related Tags

Brown University





1271 Tutors

California Institute of Technology




2131 Tutors

Carnegie Mellon University




982 Tutors

Columbia University





1256 Tutors

Dartmouth University





2113 Tutors

Emory University





2279 Tutors

Harvard University





599 Tutors

Massachusetts Institute of Technology



2319 Tutors

New York University





1645 Tutors

Notre Dam University





1911 Tutors

Oklahoma University





2122 Tutors

Pennsylvania State University





932 Tutors

Princeton University





1211 Tutors

Stanford University





983 Tutors

University of California





1282 Tutors

Oxford University





123 Tutors

Yale University





2325 Tutors