Observing Bioreactions

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timer Asked: Oct 15th, 2018
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Question Description

Task 1: Observing Bioreactions



Introduction:



Bioreactions (i.e., fight, flight, freeze, or appease) include quick responses to stimuli or threats that are dangerous and fearful experiences, many of which are caused by social interactions. Bioreactions help the brain reinforce certain pathways. This is one way to learn. Some pathways then associate that past reaction with similar events. The fear response may then become associated with other non-fearful events. Because the brain is so good at making these associations, we are not even aware of the miscue.



Bioreactions are automatic responses that happen within 11–14 milliseconds. In most cases, they are not under your control. However, you can learn to become aware of when you are experiencing a bioreaction by paying attention to what is going on in your body.



To become aware of your bioreactions, it may be helpful to ask yourself the following questions:

• What event/experience led to the bioreaction?

• What emotions did you feel?

• How did your body react?

• What, if anything, did you do differently when you noticed you were having a bioreaction?

• Why is it important for you to be aware of your bioreactions?


Requirements:



Your submission must be your original work. No more than a combined total of 30% of the submission and no more than a 10% match to any one individual source can be directly quoted or closely paraphrased from sources, even if cited correctly. An originality report is provided when you submit your task that can be used as a guide.



You must use the rubric to direct the creation of your submission because it provides detailed criteria that will be used to evaluate your work. Each requirement below may be evaluated by more than one rubric aspect. The rubric aspect titles may contain hyperlinks to relevant portions of the course.



Note: Complete the Learning Brains and bioreaction material found in module 1 in your course of study before completing this task.

A. Describe a time when you were in a social situation that triggered a bioreaction(s) by doing the following:

1. Describe the environment around you before and during the bioreaction(s).

2. Describe the stimulus (which the amygdala interprets as a threat) that triggered the bioreaction.

3. Describe the bioreaction(s) (i.e., fight, flight, freeze, and appease) you experienced.

4. Describe the physical sensations (e.g., sweaty palms, tight muscles) you experienced in your body when you became aware of the bioreaction(s).

5. Describe the feeling(s) you experienced in the social situation before, during, and after the bioreaction(s).

6. Describe what you would do differently to successfully navigate this type of reaction the next time you experience a similar social situation.

a. Reflect on why it is important to react differently when you experience this bioreaction.

B. Demonstrate professional communication in the content and presentation of your submission.


Rubric guideline

QVP Task 1 (1018)

Not Evident

Approaching Competence

Competent

A1. Environment

A description of the environment before and during the bioreaction(s) is not provided.

The description is missing details or includes unclear details about the environment before and during the bioreaction(s).

The description of the environment includes specific, contextual, and sensory details about the environment before and during the bioreaction(s).

A2. Stimulus

A description of the stimulus or threat that triggered the bioreaction(s) is not provided.

The description is missing details or includes unclear details about the stimulus or threat that triggered the bioreaction(s).

The description contains relevant and specific details about the stimulus or threat that triggered the bioreaction(s).

A3. Description of Bioreaction(s)

A description of the bioreactions(s) experienced is not provided.

The description reflects limited awareness of specific bioreaction(s) and includes minimal details of the candidate’s personal experience.

The description reflects awareness of specific bioreaction(s) and includes specific details of the candidate’s personal experience.

A4. Physical Response

A description of the physical sensations experienced during the bioreaction(s) is not provided.

The description demonstrates a lack of awareness of the specific physical sensations that occurred when the candidate became aware of the bioreaction(s).

The description demonstrates awareness of specific physical sensations that occurred when the candidate became aware of the bioreaction(s).

A5. Feeling(s)

A description of the feeling(s) experienced in the social situation is not provided.

The description is missing details or includes unclear details of the feeling(s) experienced in the social situation before, during, and after the bioreaction(s).

The description includes specific, reflective details of the feeling(s) experienced in the social situation before, during, and after the bioreaction(s).

A6. What Could Be Done Differently

A description of what could be done differently to successfully navigate the reaction is not provided.

The description is not practical or does not appropriately address what the candidate would do differently, or the response is not feasible to successfully navigate the reaction in a similar social situation.

The description is practical and appropriately addresses what the candidate would do differently to successfully navigate the reaction in a similar social situation.

A6a. Reflection

A reflection on the importance of reacting differently during the bioreaction is not provided.

The reflection includes unclear insights or does not demonstrate understanding of the importance of modifying the candidate’s response when experiencing the identified bioreaction.

The reflection includes personal insights and demonstrates understanding of the importance of modifying the candidate’s response when experiencing the identified bioreaction.

B. https://lrps.wgu.edu/provision/27641407

Content is unstructured, is disjointed, or contains pervasive errors in mechanics, usage, or grammar. Vocabulary or tone is unprofessional or distracts from the topic.

Content is poorly organized, is difficult to follow, or contains errors in mechanics, usage, or grammar that cause confusion. Terminology is misused or ineffective.

Content reflects attention to detail, is organized, and focuses on the main ideas as prescribed in the task or chosen by the candidate. Terminology is pertinent, is used correctly, and effectively conveys the intended meaning. Mechanics, usage, and grammar promote accurate interpretation and understanding.

Tutor Answer

kathysmth
School: Cornell University

Attached.

Running head: OBSERVING BOIREACTIONS

Observing Bioreactions
Name:
Course:
Instructor:
Date:

1

OBSERVING BIOREACTIONS

2
Bioreactions

Bioreactions refers to the signals that the human brain receives in the Amygdala to
respond to strong emotions of the brain conditions alternatives fear, flight, and freeze or appease
(Jones, 2018). Everyone has had an experience that led to a Bioreactions. My experience
occurred one day in my class sometimes back. I had been previously asked to research on an
assignment to present to my colleagues in class. I had studied it the previous week. On this
fateful day, the teacher called me out to give a presentation of the assignment I had been
researching on. At that moment, it came to my mind that I had been assigned a topic to present
and I had completely forgotten about it. I stood up, walked to the front of the class, encouraging
myself that I could get through with the situation. I could not carry my notes of the research to
refer to since it was against the rules set by my teacher. I knew I would be punished for my
forgetfulness something that triggered fear in me. Additionally, the moment I saw all the faces
gazing at me, I was overwhelmed, and I froze.
At that moment, my mind went completely blank. The whole class zoomed in on me. My
heart rate increased drastically, and it was as if I was experiencing a heart attack. Breathing too
became a difficult task. I felt like my airway had been blocked. I was trembling due to
nervousness. My palms felt cold and clammy. I tried to talk, but my lips were trembling, and I
could not move my mouth. I was called out again by my teacher, and at that moment I came back
to my senses. I was relieved to hear that I had been given more time to prepare. Sweat was
running down my head and palms. My body temperature ha...

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Anonymous
Top quality work from this guy! I'll be back!

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