Filling FEMA IAP ICS 201 form

Anonymous
timer Asked: Oct 16th, 2018
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Question Description

utilize the “Incident Priorities” established in your prior reading assignments, for example: protection of life, incident “stabilization” (prevent it from getting bigger), protection of property, protection of environment, restoration of community.

Don't overthink this. Use the fillable form 201 to document your IAP after you have considered what incident priorities you need to include. Look at the examplar I posted as a model for you.

Group 2: A trio of individuals has opened fire using Soviet pattern automatic rifles in an enclosed two story shopping mall on a major shopping day. There are 50 stores listed on the mall directory, and the reports from the Police “Hunter” Team that deployed immediately upon arrival reports ‘bodies everywhere’, in excess of 50. One shooter has been ‘neutralized’, and one has been ‘isolated’ in the north end of the north-south oriented “W” configured mall. The closest hospital (200 beds) is 2 miles, the closest trauma center (500 beds) is 15 mi. There are two other intermediate size (350 bed) hospitals within 10 mi.

The idea simply is to make an imaginable scenario following what he started in the top or something close to it and fill the IAP form.

I have attached a fallible form and the reading you need for the IAP

I also attached an example for another scenario

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Contents Chapter 1: Introduction ................................................................................................................. 1 Purpose ....................................................................................................................................... 3 Applicability and Scope .............................................................................................................. 3 Authorities and Foundational Documents ................................................................................ 3 Chapter 2: The Incident Action Planning Process ........................................................................ 5 Incident Action Planning ............................................................................................................ 5 The Planning “P” and the Operations “O” ............................................................................ 6 What is the IAP? ..................................................................................................................... 7 Phase 1: Understand The Situation .......................................................................................... 8 Gaining Initial Situational Awareness ................................................................................... 8 Establishing Initial Incident Priorities ................................................................................... 9 Developing the Action Planning Team ................................................................................ 10 Initiating Incident Action Planning ...................................................................................... 11 Conducting Incident Action Planning Meetings and Briefings .......................................... 11 Phase 2: Establish Incident Objectives ................................................................................... 17 Responsibilities .................................................................................................................... 17 Priorities ................................................................................................................................ 17 Incident Objectives .............................................................................................................. 18 Table 2. Priorities—Objectives—Strategies—Tactics, Tasks, Work Assignments ................. 19 UCG Develops and Update Objectives ................................................................................ 20 The C&GS Meeting ............................................................................................................... 20 Phase 3: Develop the Plan ...................................................................................................... 22 Responsibilities for Operations Planning ........................................................................... 22 Strategies ............................................................................................................................. 23 Using the Operational Planning Worksheet (FEMA-ICS Form 215) .................................. 27 The Operations Tactics Meeting ......................................................................................... 29 Phase 4: Prepare and Disseminate the Plan ......................................................................... 30 Planning Section Responsibilities ....................................................................................... 32 January 2012 FEMA Incident Action Planning Guide i General Staff ........................................................................................................................ 37 Additional Items to the IAP .................................................................................................. 38 The Planning Meeting .......................................................................................................... 38 Printing and Distributing the IAP ......................................................................................... 39 Phase 5: Execute, Evaluate, and Revise the Plan.................................................................. 40 Operations Briefing .............................................................................................................. 40 Assess Progress and Effectiveness .................................................................................... 42 Ending Incident Action Planning .............................................................................................. 42 Appendix A: How to Develop Incident Objectives ....................................................................... 43 Appendix B: Incident Command System Map Symbols ............................................................. 47 Appendix C: Job Aids for Staff Preparing FEMA ICS Forms for the IAP ..................................... 48 Appendix D: Final Quality Assurance Checklist .......................................................................... 56 Appendix E: Maintaining Situational Awareness Throughout the Life Cycle of The Incident .. 57 Information Collection Plan ................................................................................................. 57 Situational Awareness Products ......................................................................................... 57 Situation Update Briefing ....................................................................................................58 Responsibilities .................................................................................................................... 58 Summary .............................................................................................................................. 59 Annex 1: Acronyms....................................................................................................................... 60 Annex 2: Glossary......................................................................................................................... 62 January 2012 FEMA Incident Action Planning Guide ii CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) primary mission is to reduce the loss of life and property and protect the Nation from all hazards. When FEMA becomes involved in an incident, it is because the scope and scale of the incident necessitates Federal assistance. When FEMA is engaged, officials from the State and local government are also involved along with nongovernmental organizations (NG0s), elements of the private sector, and—more than likely—other Federal departments and agencies. Ensuring that the efforts of all players are coordinated and synchronized to achieve the best results is the job of incident management. It is also the reason that the National Incident Management System and the Incident Command System (ICS) exist. Incident The National Incident Management System Glossary defines incident as “an occurrence, natural or manmade, that requires a response to protect life or property.” For the purposes of this guide, the term, incident, is used to refer to incidents in which FEMA is involved, generally in support of and in partnership with State, territorial, tribal, and local governments. The incident action planning process provides a tool to synchronize operations at the incident level and ensures that incident operations are conducted in support of incident objectives. The iterative incident action planning process provides FEMA and all interagency partners involved in incident management operations the primary tool for managing incidents. A disciplined system of planning phases and collaboration sessions fosters partnerships and clearly focuses incident operations. Over many years of managing all types and sizes of incidents, ICS practitioners have developed and refined the incident action planning process as a way to plan and execute operations on any incident. This means that incident action planning is more than producing an incident action plan (IAP). It is a set of activities, repeated each operational period, that provides a consistent rhythm and structure to incident management. The organizations that originated ICS and use the system have, after many years of trial and error, developed a set of forms that assist incident personnel in completing this integrated process. Incident leaders must ensure that the plan being developed meets the needs of the incident. Such leaders must also ensure that the forms—while valuable for moving along the path—do not become the primary focus of the planning process. The completion of these forms assists the integrated and rational planning process. FEMA has slightly modified these standard ICS forms to address the implementation of assistance programs and the requirements for assigning resources. Incident action planning is an operational activity and must either direct or support operations. January 2012 FEMA Incident Action Planning Guide 1 Because ICS is the basis for managing incident activities, all incidents to which FEMA responds require the use of the ICS incident action planning process. All members of the Unified Coordination Group and the command and general staff play specific and essential parts in the process. This includes not just FEMA staff, but also our State and Federal interagency partners who are engaged in incident management. When each member plays his/her part correctly, the process is a tool that can bring order to the often chaotic world of managing complex incidents and enables incident management personnel to address problems that seem insurmountable. Because incidents in which FEMA is engaged are complex and intergovernmental and interagency, applying the incident action planning process accurately, consistently, and completely is essential to the success of incident operations. Disciplined application of the incident action planning process produces positive effects on incidents of all size and scope and maintains the otherwise perishable planning skills of FEMA personnel. While the process described in this guide outlines how FEMA as a part of the whole community executes incident action planning, those involved in a FEMA response and recovery must recognize that it will, in all probability, not be the only incident action planning process being executed (as illustrated in Figure 1 below). For example, local and municipal organizations may develop IAPs to guide the actions of first responders. For a catastrophic incident there may be hundreds of concurrent incident action planning efforts taking place simultaneously. The joint IAP that State and Federal incident management personnel develop must support all local IAPs and synchronize those at the State and Federal level. County Law Enforcement IAP County IAP Joint State and Local Fire IAP Joint Search and Rescue IAP County IAP Joint Emergency Route Clearance IAP City Fire IAP County IAP City Police IAP City IAP Joint Federal and State IAP Figure 1: IAPs Developed Across All Echelons of an Incident January 2012 FEMA Incident Action Planning Guide 2 PURPOSE This guide is intended to promote the effectiveness of FEMA incident operations by standardizing the incident action planning process. The guide explains the ICS incident action planning process, describes how FEMA applies it on all FEMA incidents, defines the specific roles and responsibilities of the various players, and establishes standards for incident action planning on FEMA incidents. This guide also communicates to FEMA’s partners the details of how the agency conducts the incident action planning process. This guide is also intended to serve as a reference for incident personnel and to provide the basis for FEMA incident action planning staffing and exercising. Finally, this guide informs the required training, position task books, and development of courses for the positions of the FEMA Qualification System. APPLICABILITY AND SCOPE The guidance contained in this Incident Action Planning Guide applies to all FEMA incidents, including those involving Presidential declarations under the Stafford Act, as well as incidents requiring a coordinated Federal response where the Stafford Act does not apply. Compliance with this guidance is mandatory for all FEMA personnel. This guide is also intended to promote cooperation and interoperability among all levels of government, NGOs, and the private sector by communicating FEMA’s commitment to incident action planning to our partners and sharing the details of how FEMA implements the process. AUTHORITIES AND FOUNDATIONAL DOCUMENTS A number of foundational documents provide statutory, regulatory, and executive guidance for FEMA disaster response. Some key foundational documents are as follows: • • • • • • • • • • • Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Public Law 93-288, as amended, 42 U.S.C. 5121-5207) Title 44 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Emergency Management and Assistance Homeland Security Act (Public Law 107-296, as amended, 6 U.S.C. §§ 101 et seq.) Homeland Security Presidential Directive 5, 2003 Post-Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-295), October 4, 2006 National Response Framework, January 2008 National Disaster Recovery Framework, September 2011 National Incident Management System, December 2008 The Federal Emergency Management Agency Publication 1, November 2010 Incident Management and Support Keystone, January 2011 Comprehensive Preparedness Guide 101--Developing and Maintaining State, Territorial, Tribal, and Local Government Emergency Plans, January 2009 January 2012 FEMA Incident Action Planning Guide 3 • • • Presidential Policy Directive 8: National Preparedness, March 2011. National Preparedness Goal, September 2011 FEMA Incident Management Handbook (FEMA B-761/Interim Change 1), expires January 1, 2013 January 2012 FEMA Incident Action Planning Guide 4 CHAPTER 2: THE INCIDENT ACTION PLANNING PROCESS INCIDENT ACTION PLANNING Incident management personnel involved in an operation that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is coordinating use the Incident Command System’s (ICS) incident action planning process to develop incident action plans (IAPs). All partners involved in the incident (Emergency Support Functions [ESFs], nongovernmental organizations [NGOs], and State) achieve unity of effort through its disciplined process. Additionally, the IAP is the vehicle by which the senior leaders of an incident; the governor of an affected state, through the State Coordinating Officer (SCO); and the President, through the Federal Coordinating Officer (FCO), communicate their expectations and provide clear guidance to those managing an incident. The incident action planning process requires collaboration and participation among all incident management leaders and their staffs from across the whole community. The incident action planning process is built on the following phases: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Understand the situation Establish incident objectives Develop the plan Prepare and disseminate the plan Execute, evaluate, and revise the plan The product of this process, a well-conceived, complete IAP facilitates successful incident operations and provides a basis for evaluating performance in achieving incident objectives. The IAP identifies incident objectives and provides essential information regarding incident organization, resource allocation, work assignments, safety, and weather. January 2012 FEMA Incident Action Planning Guide 5 Figure 2: The Planning “P”: The Incident Action Planning Process ICS and the incident action planning process are used on all incidents in which FEMA is engaged—both Stafford Act and non-Stafford Act incidents. For Stafford Act incidents, an FCO is appointed by the President based on the recommendation of the Regional Administrator (RA) to manage Federal resources and support activities. For non-Stafford Act incidents, the Department of Homeland Security designates a Federal Resource Coordinator (FRC) to perform essentially the same functions that the FCO performs, but without the specific Stafford Act authorities. Both the FCO and the FRC lead an Incident Management Assistance Team (IMAT). In this guide, the term, FCO refers to both FCO and FRC, and all IAP guidance applies equally to Stafford Act and non-Stafford Act incidents. The Planning “P” and the Operations “O” The Planning “P” (Figure 2) depicts the stages in the incident action planning process. The leg of the “P” includes the initial steps to gain awareness of the situation and establish the organization for incident management. Although maintaining situational awareness is essential throughout the life cycle of the incident, the steps in Phase 1 are done only one time. Once they are accomplished, incident management shifts into a cycle that of planning and operations, informed by ongoing situational awareness, that continues and is repeated each operational period. This cycle, which is depicted in the barrel of the “P”, becomes the Operations “O,” (Figure 3). January 2012 FEMA Incident Action Planning Guide 6 Figure 3: The Operations “O”: The Operational Period Cycle of the Incident Action Planning Process What is the IAP? The IAP is a written plan that defines the incident objectives and reflects the tactics necessary to manage an incident during an operational period. There is only one FEMA IAP for each incident, and that IAP is developed at the incident level. The IAP is developed through the incident action planning process. The IAP is a directive, “downward-looking” tool The Operational Period that is operational at its core; it is not primarily An operational period is the period of an assessment tool, feedback mechanism, or time scheduled for executing a given report. However, a well-crafted IAP helps senior set of operational actions as specified leadership understand incident objectives and in the IAP. The length of the issues. operational period, typically 12 to 24 The following sections describe the phases in the incident action planning process. January 2012 hours at the beginning of incident requiring extensive response efforts, is established during Phase 1 and subsequently reviewed and adjusted throughout the life cycle of the incident as operations require. When operations are focused primarily on recovery programs, operational periods are typically a week or longer. FEMA Incident Action Planning Guide 7 PHASE 1: UNDERSTAND THE SITUATION Effective actions during Phase 1 may mean the difference between a successfully managed incident and one in which effective incident management is achieved slowly or not at all. Phase 1 focuses on actions that take place prior to the first operational period. While many important things are accomplished during this initial period, efforts focus on gaining an understanding of the situation and establishing initial incident priorities. Gaining an understanding of the situation includes gathering, recording, analyzing, and displaying information regarding the scale, SAVER2 scope, complexity, and potential incident FEMA’s geospatial viewer is called the impacts. Comprehensive situational Situational Awareness Viewer for Emergency awareness is essential to developing and Response & Recovery (SAVER2). This viewer displays data from emergency management implementing an effective IAP. Initial incident priorities are generally established by higher level authorities such as the Governor of the affected State and the FEMA Regional Administrator (RA). partners to provide an integrated operational approach during response to disasters. SAVER2 is a two-way information sharing system that collects, processes, and ...
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Tutor Answer

CompEngineerHarold
School: UT Austin

Attached.

INCIDENT BRIEFING (ICS 201)
1. Incident Name:
A trio gunfire at an enclosed 2 storey
shopping mall

2. Incident Number:
10-122118

3. Date/Time Initiated:
Date: 10/17/2018
Time: 1430

4. Map/Sketch (include sketch, showing the total area of operations, the incident site/area, impacted and threatened
areas, overflight results, trajectories, impacted shorelines, or other graphics depicting situational status and resource
assignment):

5. Situation Summary and Health and Safety Briefing (for briefings or transfer of command): Recognize potential
incident Health and Safety Hazards and develop necessary measures (remove hazard, provide personal protective
equipment, warn people of the hazard) to protect responders from those hazards.
A group of three individuals have engaged the public in an open fire russle using Soviet pattern automatic rifles in an
enclosed two story shopping mall on a major shopping day. Calls started coming in at around 14:30 and upon hearing
the “Hunter” police team was deployed into the scene of incident. The team have reported more than 50 bodies that
have been recovered. One shooter has been ‘neutralized’, and one has been ‘isolated’ in the north end of the northsouth oriented “W” configured mall.

Image Above: Red circle represents the major place of operations for the police and the mall is at the center
6. Prepared by:
ICS 201, Page 1

Name: James R. Maxwell

Position/Title:Mall Director

Signature: __________________

Date/Time: 10/17/2018 3:30 PM

INCIDENT BRIEFING (ICS 201)
1. Incident Name:
A trio gunfire at an enclosed 2 storey
shopping mall

2. Incident Number:
10-122118

3. Date/Time Initiated:
Date: 10/17/2018 Time: 1430

7. Current and Planned Objectives:
Close the shopping mall and the area around it from the public
Close all the roads leading to and from the shopping mall by setting up road blocks at a distance of quatre a mile from
the mall (scene)
Have another police team outside the mall on stand-buy
Come up with an incident command system (ICS) which will help establish a common hierarchy between the various
agencies and...

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Review

Anonymous
Tutor went the extra mile to help me with this essay. Citations were a bit shaky but I appreciated how well he handled APA styles and how ok he was to change them even though I didnt specify. Got a B+ which is believable and acceptable.

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