Identify my professional skills and communicate them effectively in an elevator speech

Anonymous
timer Asked: Oct 17th, 2018
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Question Description

WORKSHEET INSTRUCTIONS

Part I:

1. List three professional accomplishments related to work or school.

Examples: volunteering for a worthy cause, successfully mediating a dispute among your co-workers, solving a tough problem for your employer, helping your athletic or academic team to be successful, presenting difficult or highly technical information in class, facing unusual travel or cultural challenges, starting or making a major contribution to a small business, etc.

2. List three skills and behaviors you demonstrated to attain each achievement.

Examples: engaging others in discussion, working independently, listening carefully, paying attention to detail, thinking abstractly, being decisive, taking risks that paid off, communicating effectively, training diligently, etc.

Part II and III: Networking is the number one way that people get jobs in the U.S., yet it requires a confident behavior to leave a favorable impression. This confidence is developed through preparation and practice of your Elevator Speech. Follow the guidelines below for your First Impression exercise, where you will deliver your Elevator Speech.

Creating Your Elevator Speech: Spend some time thinking about how you would introduce yourself to a potential employer or other influential business associate, using the worksheet on the reverse side.

  • Small Talk and Background: Include relevant facts about your background that can be explained in an interesting way. Depending on the situation (networking event, meeting someone in an “elevator” or in an interview) what background information are you comfortable sharing, and is appropriate to share? Examples: where you are from, something unique about you (born and raised in X state, just returned from a trip to X, just earned pilots license, etc). This is the “small talk” that occurs before most people launch in with the question, “So what do you do?”
  • College Student’s Elevator Speech: When describing what you do, you may share why you selected your major, why you find some courses or professors interesting, the most rewarding thing about your current job or activity, etc. Also include information about one of your selected accomplishments and how the behavior(s) you demonstrated applies to your ability to be successful in your future career.

First Impression Exercise Assignment (later in the semester): In the First Impression Exercise, be prepared to enter the assigned conference room, shake hands and introduce yourself to the guest, share the information you prepared, answer any questions they have and ask questions to learn something about the other person. Be sure to keep the conversation on a professional level and do not forget to practice a good firm handshake, maintain direct eye contact, and confident body language while you are seated across from the guest. Watch out for excessive mannerisms and movements.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Elevator Pitch/Your Living Bio (30 Points) Purpose: Identify your professional skills and communicate them effectively in an elevator speech. ● ● ● ● Use the following instructions to complete worksheet on the next page and compile the information into your personal pitch. An “A” will have fully completed the worksheet with complete sentences/paragraphs and a thoughtful reflection. ○ Text boxes are expandable and the size presented is not indicative of the amount of space required to earn an outstanding score. You must bring your speech to class on practice day. Be prepared to practice with your classmates. Submit the completed worksheet with your typed elevator speech to D2L/Brightspace by the due date. WORKSHEET INSTRUCTIONS Part I: 1. List three professional accomplishments related to work or school. Examples: volunteering for a worthy cause, successfully mediating a dispute among your co-workers, solving a tough problem for your employer, helping your athletic or academic team to be successful, presenting difficult or highly technical information in class, facing unusual travel or cultural challenges, starting or making a major contribution to a small business, etc. 2. List three skills and behaviors you demonstrated to attain each achievement. Examples: engaging others in discussion, working independently, listening carefully, paying attention to detail, thinking abstractly, being decisive, taking risks that paid off, communicating effectively, training diligently, etc. Part II and III: Networking is the number one way that people get jobs in the U.S., yet it requires a confident behavior to leave a favorable impression. This confidence is developed through preparation and practice of your Elevator Speech. Follow the guidelines below for your First Impression exercise, where you will deliver your Elevator Speech. Creating Your Elevator Speech: Spend some time thinking about how you would introduce yourself to a potential employer or other influential business associate, using the worksheet on the reverse side. ● Small Talk and Background: Include relevant facts about your background that can be explained in an interesting way. Depending on the situation (networking event, meeting someone in an “elevator” or in an interview) what background information are you comfortable sharing, and is appropriate to share? Examples: where you are from, something unique about you (born and raised in X state, just returned from a trip to X, just earned pilots license, etc). This is the “small talk” that occurs before most people launch in with the question, “So what do you do?” ● College Student’s Elevator Speech: When describing what you do, you may share why you selected your major, why you find some courses or professors interesting, the most rewarding thing about your current job or activity, etc. Also include information about one of your selected accomplishments and how the behavior(s) you demonstrated applies to your ability to be successful in your future career. First Impression Exercise Assignment (later in the semester): In the First Impression Exercise, be prepared to enter the assigned conference room, shake hands and introduce yourself to the guest, share the information you prepared, answer any questions they have and ask questions to learn something about the other person. Be sure to keep the conversation on a professional level and do not forget to practice a good firm handshake, maintain direct eye contact, and confident body language while you are seated across from the guest. Watch out for excessive mannerisms and movements. Elevator Speech Worksheet Name: Part I: Professional Skills Self-Assessment Use the following format to think of three of your top accomplishments. List the skills you used, and why those skills will help you succeed in future positions. Accomplishment #1 Transferable Skills Used Related to Future Job Success Transferable Skills Used Related to Future Job Success Transferable Skills Used Related to Future Job Success a. b. c. Accomplishment #2 a. b. c. Accomplishment #3 a. b. c. Part II: Creating Your Elevator Speech Use the following format to organize your elevator speech. Feel free to deliver the information in any way you feel will be most engaging. State your Name and Major Small talk or background info that you would share What type of career field have you chosen – describe it with enthusiasm? Why are you interested in this field – make it interesting and use examples? Why do you think you will be successful – what unique skills do you bring to a company (remember your accomplishments)? Part III: Type your Speech below and don’t forget to end with a transitional question - you are starting a conversation!: it is a 30 second pitch of you ...
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ProfessorLessard
School: New York University

I have worked o...

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Anonymous
Thanks, good work

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