HCP essay that concentrated on sex workers(If you can mention some Chinese elements)

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Concentrated on sex workers and the requirement I have uploaded with the files. (If you can, please put some Chinese elements into it) .define and describe a significant political/social/cultural problem; (2) justify and frame this problem to convince your audience that the problem you’re addressing and the questions you’re asking are alive and relevant right now; (3) summarize and critically evaluate various conversations and debates made by credible scholars and organizations about your topic; and (4) describe and decipher the historical contexts of the problem at hand by locating evidence from both the past and the present that tie the problem as we see it today to its past. (Please MUST READ THE FILES I UPLOADED!!!)

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WR 39C: ARGUMENT & RESEARCH _______________________________________ The Historical Conversations Project Two major projects comprise the 39C curriculum: The Historical Conversations Project (HCP) and The Advocacy Project (AP). This first one, the HCP, asks you to do four things: (1) present and analyze a significant political/social/cultural problem; (2) frame this problem with motives or warrants, which are current examples, incidents, or arguments that convince your audience that the problem you're addressing and the questions you're asking are alive and relevant right now; (3) summarize and critically evaluate various conversations and debates made by credible scholars and organizations about your topic; and (4) decipher the historical contexts of the problem at hand by locating at least 2 pieces of evidence, at least one from the past and one from the present, that tie the problem as we see it today to its past. I. Choosing a Topic Choose a topic that interests you, something that moved you. Use the assigned readings as points of departure for this first composition. You will have to conduct some of your own research. Let’s talk about what to look for and how to find it! Some of the sources listed below we have not yet read. Nevertheless, you have access to all of them. Over the next three weeks you will work on this project, which will be submitted for a grade at the end of week 5. One of the main purposes of this first assignment is to expose you and your peers to various topics, arguments, histories, and background knowledge that will enable you engage with each other rigorously and productively over the course of the quarter. Another purpose is to begin the process of teaching you how to locate, evaluate, select, arrange, and integrate sources into a multi-modal composition. As a genre of communication—and in the case of this assignment, one that frames a problem, delivers arguments, uses evidence, and speaks to a broad audience—a multi-modal composition can be a synthesis of various rhetorical positions—visual and written for example—that work together to deepen argumentative positions and claims. Your composition's multi-modality will come from your use of these two modes together. You may be asking yourself (and you should ask your teacher), “What is a composition and what does it mean if it’s multi-modal?” In your case, you will locate at least two pieces of evidence, one from the present that helps you define the problem you are exploring and one from the past that deciphers this problem’s historical context. And then you will use credible sources to describe for your readers how these distinct pieces of evidence work together to explain the viability of the contemporary problem. You will need to ask a number of questions in order to understand how your key pieces of evidence speak to each to each other: How does the “artifact” from the past illustrate the evolution of the problem? What arguments do scholars make about the problem’s past and its present? What are scholars and credible people and organizations debating about the problem and its past? As you explain how and why certain historical changes tie your central pieces of evidence together, you will have to think creatively to arrange your arguments and your evidence, both your key pieces of evidence and scholarly sources, to persuade your audience that the historical foundation you have located is meaningful to our understanding of the problem in the present. II. Annotated Bibliography: 6-8 Sources Purpose: An annotated bibliography, as we are using it here, is a preliminary compilation of your sources. An annotation, which is a short note or comment, gives you the opportunity to document your initial understanding of your sources. The entries in the bibliography will provide you with points of reference that you can look back to as your understanding of your sources deepens and as you wield arguments with more dexterity. Task: With your topic selected, read your sources and present what you have learned about your sources in an annotation. Your annotations should include information that both summarizes a selected source for its intrinsic qualities and explains how you intend to use this piece of evidence. Writers of research-based composition often use different types of sources— fact/background sources, exhibit/primary sources, argument and theory sources—to enable them to create various perspectives on their topic and document important details. In the realm of research writing, understanding and describing the value of your sources as pieces of evidence and figuring out how they work together to support arguments are central aspects of a research project, especially in its early stages. Sources & Citations: At minimum, you should use between 6 and 8 sources. • • • Locate at least 2 significant pieces of evidence, at least one from the past and one from the present, that tie the problem as we see it today to its past. 4-6 scholarly sources, at least 2 of which you should find yourself. Use the MLA system for citing your sources. Comments: -Use MLA format. Consult the MLA Formatting and Style Guide online (Links to an external site.) (Links to an external site.) -See pages 80-83 in AGWR. III. Statement of Prospective Claims (500- 900 Words) This will be due at the end of Week 3 Purpose: Your first attempt to write about your topic and your guiding questions will most likely be difficult. This statement of prospective claims is the first formal presentation of your knowledge about the topic and your understanding of the source material. Your primary purpose is to write something that will help further your understanding of your claims. Write your prospective statement in an experimental mindset, try to position this statement as one that captures your current understanding of your sources, your arguments, and the questions you are trying to answer. In other words, write something that will guide you as you craft, revise, and sharpen your questions and arguments. Task: Now that you have summarized and evaluated your sources and offered some speculative thoughts about how you intend to use them as pieces of evidence, write a short statement in which you illustrate how your sources work together to support your developing arguments. Comments: You may use the following prompts to structure a response that should be written as a short essay. Please use first-person language. You do not have to answer these questions, they are prompts to be used as you see fit. 1. State your guiding questions -What are my guiding questions? -How do my sources address these questions? What are their answers? 2. Describe the historical aspects of your topic and guiding questions. -What cases or ideas do your sources trace back in time to substantiate their arguments about the contemporary problems and questions at hand? -Can you offer reasons for why the historical aspects are important? 3. Source Integration -How do my sources talk to or argue with each other? -How might they fit together to support various argumentative claims? Additional Guidance What is a “Key Piece of Evidence” for the HCP? -Key Evidence (Present): It can be a table of data, an image or a series of images or an incident. It is something that clearly articulates the cultural, political, and social problem that is the focus of your project. -How do you locate your evidence? Any social, cultural, or political problem that demands the attention of scholars, intellectuals, thinktanks and advocacy organizations will be defined by and grounded in evidence, and these pieces of evidence are what you are trying to find. What sorts of evidence do your scholarly and credible resources use to substantiate their arguments? -Key Evidence (Past): Like your evidence from the present, your historical artifact(s) can be a compilation of statistics in a table or a graph, an image, an incident, ideas and arguments from primary sources, stories, and various art forms. You can use credible sources to locate your historical “artifacts,” and in selecting them think and write about how the historical evidence speaks to your central problem in the present. Try to describe how your historical pieces reside in the past, summarize how they speak to your contemporary evidence, and explain how the historical dialogue between these two pieces or bodies of evidence connects the present with the past. The historical space between them, which documents historical changes, will enable you to articulate clearly the importance of your central problem in the present. WR 39C: ARGUMENT & RESEARCH _______________________________________ The Historical Conversations Project Two major projects comprise the 39C curriculum: The Historical Conversations Project (HCP) and The Advocacy Project (AP). This first one, the HCP, asks you to do four things: (1) define and describe a significant political/social/cultural problem; (2) justify and frame this problem to convince your audience that the problem you’re addressing and the questions you’re asking are alive and relevant right now; (3) summarize and critically evaluate various conversations and debates made by credible scholars and organizations about your topic; and (4) describe and decipher the historical contexts of the problem at hand by locating evidence from both the past and the present that tie the problem as we see it today to its past. Over the next four weeks you will work on this project, which will be submitted for a grade at the end of week four. One of the main purposes of this first assignment is to expose you and your peers to various topics, arguments, histories, and background knowledge that will enable you engage with each other over the course of the quarter. Another purpose of the HCP is to begin the process of teaching you how to locate, evaluate, select, arrange, and integrate sources into a multi-modal composition. As a genre of communication—and in the case of this assignment, one that frames a problem, delivers arguments, uses evidence, and speaks to an audience that you define through your research—a multi-modal composition can be a synthesis of various rhetorical positions—visual and written for example—that work together to deepen argumentative positions and claims. You may be asking yourself (and you should ask your teacher), “What is a composition and what does it mean if it’s multi-modal?” In your case, you will locate at least two pieces of evidence, one from the present that helps you define the problem you are exploring and one from the past that deciphers this problem’s historical context. And then you will use credible sources to describe for your readers how these distinct pieces of evidence work together to explain the viability of the contemporary problem. You will need to ask a number of questions in order to understand how your key pieces of evidence speak to each to each other: How does the “artifact” from the past illustrate the evolution of the problem? What arguments do scholars make about the problem’s past and its present? What are scholars and credible people and organizations debating about the problem and its past? As you explain how and why certain historical changes tie your central pieces of evidence together, you will have to think creatively to arrange your arguments and your evidence, both your key pieces of evidence and scholarly sources, to persuade your audience that the historical foundation you have located is meaningful to our understanding of the problem in the present. The Assignments Assignments Deadline Prewriting: Annotations & source evaluations, reading responses, free writing, outlines, etc. Week 2 Draft 1 (Your teacher may ask for more drafts!) (Written portion: 1500 minimum, multimodal, including notes and in-text citations but not bibliography.) Week 3 Final & Graded Submission (Written portion: 1700 minimum, multimodal, including notes and in-text citations but not bibliography.) Week 4 or Week 5 The Rules of the Game: The Graded Submission: By the end of Week 4 or thereabouts, you will submit this assignment for a grade, and your instructor may ask that you “publish” this final version in your ePortfolio for your peers to read. Instructions for how to make your ePortfolio viewable by your peers will be forthcoming from your instructor. The Ungraded Work: Between now and the final submission deadline, your teacher will give you a number of assignments to complete: source evaluations and annotations, outlines, prospective statements of argument, free writing, drafts, peer reviews, and other useful things to help you draft and craft ideas and arguments. All of these assignments are ungraded, and they give you lots of things to use in your final ePortfolio! Take advantage of these ungraded assignments; use them to explore ideas and various arguments and as opportunities to receive feedback from your peers and your instructor so that your arguments become clearer and your composition more cogent, richly textured, and gracefully organized. All of the ungraded work is mandatory, and if done well, you put yourself in a much better position to turn in a welldeveloped submission by the time the final deadline arrives. Imagine if you do not do the ungraded work, but your peers complete all of the assignments. In all likelihood, their work will be of higher quality due to its polish and to the maturity of its arguments. Keep up and have some fun exploring! The Word Count: The written component of your final submission should be 1700 words (minimum). Sources & Citations: At minimum, you should use between 6 and 8 sources. -Locate significant pieces of evidence from the past and from the present that tie the problem as we see it today to its past. -4-6 scholarly sources, at least 3 of which you should find yourself. -Use the MLA system for citing your sources. Additional Guidance What is a “Key Piece of Evidence” for the HCP? -Key Evidence (Present): It can be a table of data, an image or a series of images or an incident. It is something, a primary source for example, that clearly articulates the cultural, political, and social problem that is the focus of your project. -How do you locate your evidence? Any social, cultural, or political problem that demands the attention of scholars, intellectuals, thinktanks and advocacy organizations will be defined by and grounded in evidence, and these pieces of evidence are what you are trying to find. What sorts of evidence do your scholarly and credible resources use to substantiate their arguments? -Key Evidence (Past): Like your evidence from the present, your historical artifact(s) can be a compilation of statistics in a table or a graph, an image, an incident, ideas and arguments from primary sources, stories, and various art forms. You can use credible sources to locate your historical “artifacts,” and in selecting them think and write about how the historical evidence speaks to your central problem in the present. Try to describe how your historical pieces reside in the past, summarize how they speak to your contemporary evidence, and explain how the historical dialogue between these two pieces or bodies of evidence connects the present with the past. The historical space between them, which documents historical changes, will enable you to articulate clearly the importance of your central problem in the present. Reflective Prompts -What specific aspects of your historical evidence make it historical? Is it far enough back in time to be considered historical? Does it represent significant and meaningful historical changes? -What are my credible sources saying about my historical evidence? -How is my historical evidence different from my contemporary evidence? Why are they different? Are they too different to speak to each other to capture historical changes? -What arguments am I using from my scholarly sources and contemporary research to explain the historical relationship between my two bodies/pieces of evidence? -What significant historical changes explain the relationship between my sources? What credible sources am I using to support such explanations and summaries of historical change? ...
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Kishnewt2017
School: Rice University

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Sex Workers as a Social Problem
Introduction
Social controversies exist in many ways both historically and in modern ways. It is
apparent that sex workers are in nearly every country perceived as illegal. A sex worker is
any person who voluntarily engages in sexual acts in exchange for money, goods or other
favors. Primarily, steelworkers are heterogeneous. Historically, sex workers are referred to as
prostitutes. It is noteworthy that during the ancient Rome, prostitution was practiced. In fact,
prostitution is also seen as immoral from the biblical standpoint and other religious books. In
the contemporary world, the term sex worker has been accepted globally for those people in
the practice as a socioeconomic practice. It is notable that the engagement in sex work as in
this context has increased globally to become an industry. Therefore, sex workers are people
working in the sex industry while exchanging sexual services at a fee. Notably, the sex
workers industry is a social problem. In many countries, because commercial sex workers are
illegal, the statistics of the population is only an estimated figure by some researchers and not
government statistics. This paper determines the influence of the sex workers in society.
Sex Workers in Historic Times
According to feminists, sex work degrades women. Oftentimes, the women are
perceived as the sex workers while the men are their clients. In this regard, the female gender
is perceived weak and inferior to men. It is significant to highlight that different sex workers
enter into the practice for various reasons. For instance, throughout the 20th century, many
women in the United States got into the sex work industry because of the increased racial
discrimination at workplaces forcing them to look for other income generating avenues. In
addition, after the civil war, following the economic downfall, many women were left as
widows besides being their early years of marriage and some kids to take care. In this regard,
a significant population among the women ended up in the streets as sex workers at least to
get some cash for upkeep (Zhang et al. 757). It is apparent that the phenomenon is a societal
problem as it not only degrades the women by subjecting them to the patriarchal society as
inferiors and weak but also putting them in an awkward economic state. Notably, in the
Middle Ages, legal brothels were opened in Europe and acted as a considerable source of tax.
In the history of the United States, particularly during the civil war, many women got
most of their customers in the army. When the customers nearly dried up after the civil war,
the sex workers opened up camps along the rail construction sites. The rail constructors used
to move to the camps at night for sexual services in exchange for money. The constructors
used to leave some red lights out of the camps so that they could be called in cases of any
emergencies. In fact, the red light district was formed as a result of hanging the red light
lamps out of the tents. In the early 1900s, most of the young girls had started the practice of
prostitution. Notably, both the church and the government condemned the practice (Smith &

Surname 2
Sarah 88). Although the larger part of society...

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Anonymous
Thanks, good work

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