Stages and Stage Terminology Assignment

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timer Asked: Oct 20th, 2018
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Question Description

Assignment:

This assignment will be three short responses to the videos and files included in this unit. You will receive two points for each area below, for a total of 6 points. Please indicate clearly which number you are answering of the three questions below.

1. Theatre Spaces Around the World:

After viewing the images for incredible and spectacular theatre spaces, name your favorite image, where the theatre is located and what draws you to that image.

2. Inside of Theatre Spaces:

Describe the basic differences between a proscenium stage, a thrust stage, and an arena stage.

3. Basic Terminology for Staging a Performance:

Describe what blocking is, and why actors are often positioned in diagonals and triangles on a stage.


Material:

World Theatre Day: Stunning theatres around the world

Read more: https://metro.co.uk/2017/03/27/world-theatre-day-s...

Twitter: https://twitter.com/MetroUK | Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MetroUK/


Spectacular Theatre Spaces from Around the World

15 of the World's most spectacular Theatre Spaces:

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/spectacular-theaters/index.html (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

21 Most spectacular Theatre's in the U.S.A:

https://www.curbed.com/2017/3/15/14927584/best-theater-concert-opera-united-states (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.


Theatre's Four Spaces (Video)


Basic Terminology for Theatre Spaces (Video)


Proscenium Stage (Video)


Thrust Stage (Video)


The Arena Stage (Video)


Areas of the Stage (Video)

Stage Directions (Video)

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Types and Forms of Theatres © Theatre Projects Consultants  Table of contents Types and forms of theatres ................................................. 3 ................................................................... Smaller drama theatres .................................................... Arena ...................................................................... Thrust ...................................................................... End stage ................................................................. Flexible theatre ................................................................... Environmental theatre ................................................. Promenade theatre ................................................... Black box theatre ...................................................... Studio theatre ........................................................... Courtyard theatre ...................................................... 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 6 6 7 Spaces for drama Larger drama theatres ............................................................ 7 Proscenium theatre ............................................................ 7 Thrust and open stage.......................................................... 8 Spaces for acoustic (unamplified) music ............................. Recital hall ...................................................................... Concert hall ...................................................................... Shoebox concert hall ................................................. Vineyard concert hall, surround hall ............................... 9 9 9 10 10 Spaces for opera and dance 11 ................................................. Opera house ...................................................................... 11 Dance theatres .................................................................. 11 Spaces for multiple uses ........................................................ 12 ......................................................... 12 Multipurpose theatre Multiform theatre ...................... ........................................ 13 Spaces for entertainment ...................................................... 13 Multiuse commercial theatre – a “Broadway theatre” form ... 13 Showroom ........................................................................ 14 Spaces for media interaction ................................................ 14 Spaces for meeting and worship 15 15 15 Spaces for teaching 15 15 15 15 .......................................... Convention congress theatre .............................................. Houses of worship ............................................................. ................................................................ Single purpose spaces ....................................................... Instructional spaces .......................................................... StageConsultants technology .............................................................. © Theatre Projects theatreprojects.com  Types and forms of theatres Theatre has been around since people first gathered together to listen to someone else tell a story. Friends and family shared the responsibilities of audience and player, trading roles back and forth as long as someone had a story to share. Modern theatre may be more formal, with trained actors providing the story and sophisticated theatre-goers supplying the reactions, but the idea of sharing energy between a live actor and a live audience remains just as it ever was. The biggest difference is in the building where theatre happens. Theatre buildings evolved from the open-air amphitheatres of the Greeks and Romans to the incredible array of forms we see today. Though some forms work better for particular types of performance, there is no ideal shape of a theatre. A theatre may house drama, classical or popular music, opera, musicals, ballet, modern or folkloric dance, cabaret, circus, or any activity where a performing artist communicates with a living audience. How could any one kind of building work for all these different types of performing art? There is no ideal size of a theatre. The scale of a theatre depends on the size of the staging required by the type of performance and the number of audience to be accommodated, with each variable influencing the other as they change. No one-size-fits-all formula works with that kind of nuance. A theatre is not simply a space for looking at or listening to a performance. A successful theatre for live performance supports the emotional exchange between the performer and the audience, and between members of the audience. All that said, we’ve outlined the typical theatre forms for different performance types. **indicates venues that weren’t designed by Theatre Projects Spaces for drama Drama—comedy or tragedy—can be performed in many different types of theatres, as well as outdoors, in warehouses, stairwells, and other unusual places. Many of these spaces and forms also support musical theatre, which is discussed separately under “Spaces for entertainment.” For simplicity, we’ve divided this discussion into smaller drama theatres—which include flexible and courtyard theatres—and larger drama theatres, which include thrust, open, and proscenium stages. But keep in mind, no discussion like this can fully describe the many types of spaces where theatre happens. © Theatre Projects Consultants  Smaller drama theatres A small drama theatre usually seats between 50 and 300, with an upper limit of perhaps 400. It often doesn’t have a separate stage house—meaning the stage is within the same architectural space as the audience. These small theatres often feature a unique or especially intimate actor/audience relationship. This may be defined by a fixed seating arrangement, or the relationship may be created by temporary seating set up in a found space or in a flexible, purpose-built space. We’ve described popular forms below. Arena A theatre in which the audience completely surrounds the stage or playing area. Actor entrances to the playing area are provided through vomitories or gaps in the seating arrangement. • Bingham Theatre, Actors Theatre of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA • Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester, UK (image shown) Photo: Carlton Studios, Courtesy of the Royal Exchange Theatre Thrust A theatre in which the stage is extended so that the audience surrounds it on three sides. The thrust stage may be backed by an enclosed proscenium stage, providing a place for background scenery, but audience views into the proscenium opening are usually limited. Actor entrances are usually provided to the front of the thrust through vomitories or gaps in the seating. • Chicago Shakespeare Theater, Chicago, IL, USA • The Playhouse, Overture Center for the Arts, Madison, WI, USA (image shown) Photo: Jeff Goldberg/Esto © Theatre Projects Consultants  End stage A theatre in which the audience seating and stage occupy the same architectural space, with the stage at one end and the audience seated in front facing the stage. • The New School for Drama, Westbeth Building, New York, NY, USA (image shown) • Playwrights Horizons, New York, NY, USA** • Studio Theatre, The Lowry, Salford, UK Photo: Theatre Projects Flexible theatres Flexible theatre is a generic term for a theatre in which the playing space and audience seating can be configured as desired for each production. Often, the theatre can be configured into the arena, thrust, and end stage forms described above. Environmental, promenade, black box, and studio theatre are other terms for this type of space, suggesting particular features or qualities. Environmental theatre A found space in which the architecture of the space is intrinsic to the performance, or a theatre space that is transformed into a complete environment for the performance. The audience space and performance space are sometimes intermingled, and the action may be singlefocus or multiple-focus. In environmental theatre, the physical space is an essential part of the performance. • Mysteries productions at the Cottesloe Theatre, Royal National Theatre, London, UK (image shown) Photo: Michael Mayhew Promenade theatre A theatre without fixed seating in the main part of the auditorium – this allows the standing audience to intermingle with the performance and to follow the focal point of the action to different parts of the room. Multiple-focus action and a moving audience are the primary characteristics of the promenade theatre. • De La Guarda and Fuerzabruta productions at the Daryl Roth Theatre, New York, NY, USA** © Theatre Projects Consultants  Black box theatre A flexible theatre usually without character or embellishment—a “void” space that may indeed be black, but isn’t always. Usually, audience seating is on the main floor, with no audience galleries, though a technical gallery may be provided. Photo: Tim Griffith • Flanagan Studio Theatre, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA, USA • Kogod Theatre, Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA • Regis Philbin Studio Theatre, Marie P. DeBartolo Center for the Performing Arts, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN, USA (image shown) • Theatre Studio, Esplanade - Theatres on the Bay, Singapore Studio theatre A flexible theatre with one or more audience galleries on three or four sides of a rectangular room. The main floor can usually be reconfigured into arena, thrust, endstage, and flat floor configurations. The room usually has some architectural character. Photo: John Edward Linden Photography • Centerstage, ’62 Center for Theatre and Dance, Williams College, Williamstown, MA, USA • Clore Theatre, Unicorn Children’s Centre, London, UK • Lee Theatre, Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center, University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO, USA • Studio Theatre, RiverCenter for the Performing Arts, Columbus, GA, USA • Studio, Tempe Center for the Arts, Tempe, AZ, USA (image shown) • Studio Theatre, Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester, UK • Theatre Studio, Esplanade - Theatres on the Bay, Singapore © Theatre Projects Consultants  Photo: Mark Tupper Courtyard theatre The term courtyard theatre embraces a range of theatre forms, all with the common characteristic of at least one raised seating gallery surrounding a central area. Often this central area is flexible, and can be configured into arena, thrust, end stage, and flat floor configurations. Sometimes the central area has fixed seating that faces a proscenium opening and stage. Inspired by the Shakespearean theatre of Elizabethan times and the English Georgian Theatre, the much loved Cottesloe Theatre at the National Theatre in London is the granddaddy of contemporary courtyard theatres. Interestingly, a courtyard theatre does not need to be rectangular. Hall Two at The Sage is a striking example of a 16-sided courtyard theatre. • Arthur Miller Theatre, Charles R. Walgreen Jr. Drama Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA • Cottesloe Theatre, Royal National Theatre, London, UK • Hall Two, The Sage, Gateshead, UK • Jarson-Kaplan Theatre, Aronoff Center for the Arts, Cincinnati, OH, USA • Martha Cohen Theatre, EPCOR Centre for the Performing Arts, Calgary, Alberta, Canada • Wilde Theatre, South Hill Park, Bracknell, UK • Woolly Mammoth Theatre, Washington, DC, USA • Jerwood Vanbrugh Theatre, Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, London, UK (image shown) • Tricycle Theatre, London, UK Larger drama theatres Larger drama theatres seat audiences in the range of 300 to 900, with an upper limit of about 1,100. Larger drama theatres are usually some variant of the proscenium form. However, some feature a thrust or open stage. Proscenium theatre In a proscenium theatre, the stage is located at one end of the auditorium and is physically separated from the audience space by a proscenium wall. This is sometimes called a “two-box” arrangement—the auditorium and stage occupy two separate “boxes” or rooms. The stage box (stage house) provides fly space and wings and permits a wide variety of scenic and lighting effects. The auditorium box is the audience chamber, which may take many forms—fanshaped, courtyard, lyric, etc. Photo: Alan Karchmer/Esto © Theatre Projects Consultants  The opening between the auditorium and stage is called the proscenium frame, proscenium opening, proscenium arch, or simply the proscenium. In its earliest forms, the heart of the proscenium theatre was the forestage in front of the proscenium. It wasn’t until the middle part of the nineteenth century that performers were confined with the scenery behind the proscenium arch. Contemporary proscenium theatres try to provide a flexible transition zone between stage and audience, adaptable to suit the needs of each performance. • Albert Ivar Theatre, Goodman Theatre, Chicago, IL, USA • American Airlines Theatre, Roundabout Theatre Company, New York, NY, USA • Argyros Stage, South Coast Repertory, Costa Mesa, CA, USA • Dubai Community Theatre, Dubai, UAE • Kay Theatre, Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, College Park, MD, USA (image shown) • Le Quai, Angers, France • Mainstage, ’62 Center for Theatre and Dance, Williams College, Williamstown, MA, USA • Max Bell Theatre, EPCOR Centre for the Performing Arts, Calgary, Alberta, Canada • Paul R. Cramer Center for the Arts, Steward School, Richmond, VA, USA • Royal Court Theatre, London, UK • Sandvika Theatre, Sandvika, Norway • San Jose Repertory Theatre, San Jose, CA, USA • Douglas L. Manship, Sr. Theater for the Visual and Performing Arts, Shaw Center for the Arts, Baton Rouge, LA, USA • Steppenwolf Theatre, Chicago, IL, USA • Suzanne Roberts Theatre, Philadelphia Theatre Company, Philadelphia, PA, USA • Thompson Theatre, Louise and David Roselle Center for the Arts, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA Thrust and open stage Some larger drama theatres take the form of a thrust stage, with the audience surrounding three sides of the performance platform. The term open stage can be used interchangeably with thrust, but implies a more frontal arrangement. These and similar forms can accommodate a high seat count within an acceptable distance to the stage. Audience balconies can increase the intimacy of the room. Photo: Richard Einzig, Arcaid Tyrone Guthie’s thrust spaces in Stratford, Ontario, and Minneapolis, Minnesota are notable examples of the thrust stage. The Olivier Theatre in the National Theatre in London is a modified thrust, with the audience arrayed in a 110° arc around the front of the stage. • Angus Bowmer Theatre, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Ashland, OR, USA** • Birmingham Repertory Theatre, Birmingham, UK • Festival Theatre, Stratford Shakespeare Festival, Stratford, Ontario, Canada** • Olivier Theatre, Royal National Theatre, London, UK (image shown) • Original 1963 thrust stage and new Wurtele Thrust Stage, Guthrie Theater, Minneapolis, MN, USA** © Theatre Projects Consultants  Spaces for acoustic (unamplified) music Concert and recital halls are theatres for the performance of music. The requirements of acoustic (non-amplified) music determine the volume, shape, and even the architectural detailing of the hall. At the same time, the hall must support the visual presentation of the performance and provide an intimate patron experience. A universal characteristic of these buildings is that performers and audience share the same space—there is no architectural separation between stage and auditorium. Today, concert halls aren’t used exclusively for acoustic music. A new hall must have enough flexibility to allow other uses, like popular (amplified) and ethnic music, dance, lectures, meetings, and film presentations. Recital hall A space designed for soloists and small ensembles (up to chamber orchestra size), with a seat count typically in the range of 150 to 800. This form is a descendant of the court music rooms of the Renaissance. It is often rectangular in plan, with an open concert platform at one end of the room and seating galleries on the other three walls. Photo: Scott Frances • Dewan Filharmonik Petronas Concert Hall, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia • Gildenhorn Recital Hall, Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, College Park, MD, USA • Legacy Hall, RiverCenter for the Performing Arts, Columbus, GA, USA • Mixon Hall, Cleveland Institute of Music, Cleveland, OH, USA (image shown) • Recital Hall, Esplanade - Theatres on the Bay, Singapore • Recital Hall, Irish World Academy of Music & Drama, Limerick, Republic of Ireland • Studzinski Recital Hall, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME, USA • Robert J. Werner Recital Hall, College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA Concert hall A space designed primarily for symphonic music, with a seat count typically in the range of 1,100 to 2,000. The upper limit for a successfully intimate room is about 2,200 seats. © Theatre Projects Consultants  Shoebox concert hall The classic concert hall form is the shoebox, named after the rectangular shape and approximate proportions of a tennis-shoe box. The shoebox form has high volume, limited width, and multiple audience levels, usually with relatively narrow side seating ledges. The Musikvereinsaal in Vienna, the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, and Symphony Hall in Boston are classic examples of this form. Photo: Tim Griffith, Courtesy of The Esplanade Co. Ltd. • Chan Shun Concert Hall, Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada • Concert Hall, Esplanade - Theatres on the Bay, Singapore (image shown) • Concertgebouw, Amsterdam, Netherlands** • Dekelboum Concert Hall, Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, College Park, MD, USA • Hall One, The Sage Gateshead, Gateshead, UK • Jack Singer Concert Hall, EPCOR Centre for the Performing Arts, Calgary, Alberta, Canada • Musikvereinsaal, Vienna, Austria** • Royal Concert Hall, Nottingham, UK • Symphony Hall, Boston, MA, USA ** • The Music Center at Strathmore, Bethesda, MD, USA • Verizon Hall, Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, Philadelphia, PA, USA Vineyard concert hall, surround hall Some modern concert halls have audience seating in terraces reminiscent of a vineyard. The seating may completely or partially encircle the concert platform. An important early example of the vineyard form is the Berlin Philharmonie. A hall with partial encirclement may be called a modified vineyard. The Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles is a contemporary example of this form. Photo: Hufton & Crow / View Pictures / Rex Features • New World Symphony, Miami Beach, FL, USA • Philharmonie, Berlin, Germany** • Walt Disney Concert Hall, Music Center, Los Angeles, USA (image shown) © Theatre Projects Consultants 10 Spaces for opera and dance The opera house developed as a specific theatre form in the late Renaissance and persists to this day. Historically, opera and ballet performances coexist in these spaces, but beginning in the twentieth century, dedicated dance spaces began to appear. Opera house An opera house is a proscenium theatre in form. Seat count ranges from 1,200 to 2,000 with an upper limit of about 2,400 seats. The auditorium is almost always multilevel with side tiers or boxes to enhance visual and aural intimacy. The stage is usually large, with extensive machinery. It sometimes has separate auxiliary stages in a cruciform, sixsquare, or other arrangement to enable the opera company to perform in repertory. European opera houses generally have smaller auditoriums and more elaborate stages, as compared to ope ...
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EagleEye1
School: Carnegie Mellon University

Attached.

Running Head: THEATRE SPACES
1

Theatre Spaces
Student Name:
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THEATRE SPACES

2

1. Theatre Spaces around the World
In my view, I choose Opera house which is a proscenium theatre in form. The theatre has
seat counting ranging from 1200 to 2000 within the cap of about 2400 seats. The barn is always
multiple with side category to augment optic and deafening intimacy. The stage of the theatre is
very safe with a great appliance. It occasionally has an isolate adjuvant scene in cruciform six
square or another compromise to empower the opera company to achieve in routine. The theatre
is located in Norway, Ningbo China, and Glyndebourne Opera house in the United Kingdom.
2. Inside of Theatre Spaces
Thrust Stage
The thrust stage is enlarged so that the congregation besieges into three sides. The scene
is balanced by a confined facade stage which gives a place background scenario. The audience
glimpse into the facade opening is usually finite. The actor entrance is generally given to the
front of thrust through a chasm in the accommodation. The theatre broadens into the
congregation on three sides and is linked to the behind the cur...

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Anonymous
Good stuff. Would use again.

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