Please review the case study below and answer the following question.

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Question Description

The case study below offers an excellent perspective on how projects are often initiated under less than ideal circumstances—which often lays the ground work for project failure.

Companies that provide a service for another company usually respond to a bid document from a company that needs help. This case study is a good example of this situation. The bid document can be as simple as an email from the buyer to the seller or as complicated as a request for proposal (RFP) outlining the objectives of the project and asking a seller to develop a proposal that provides a solution.

Each company (seller and buyer) will have a business case for doing the project. The Peter’s Company is outsourcing for a reason. The Corwin Corporation is taking on the project for a different set of reasons. One of the reasons the Corwin Corporation is taking on the work is the looming, potentially very lucrative production contract if they are successful. There are no guarantees in research and development project that there will be success.

Question- Create a Scope Statement. Using the requirements documents from Part 2, prepare a Scope Statement that addresses the four components described in Section 5.3.3.1, Project Scope Statement, PMBOK 6e. The statement should not exceed 3 pages and does not need to conform to APA guidelines except for citing and referencing sources.

Below is the attached file for Requirements documents.

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. ct io n du ro ep R or le Sa n, tio bu tri is D Fo r ot N INCLUDES: THE STANDARD FOR PROJECT MANAGEMENT ANSI/PMI 99-001-2017 or A Guide to the PROJECT MANAGEMENT BODY OF KNOWLEDGE (PMBOK ® GUIDE ) Sixth Edition Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Names: Project Management Institute, publisher. Title: A guide to the project management body of knowledge (PMBOK guide) / Project Management Institute. Other titles: PMBOK guide Description: Sixth edition. | Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute, 2017. | Series: PMBOK guide | Includes bibliographical references and index. Identifiers: LCCN 2017032505 (print) | LCCN 2017035597 (ebook) | ISBN 9781628253900 (ePUP) | ISBN 9781628253917 (kindle) | ISBN 9781628253924 ( Web PDF) | ISBN 9781628251845 (paperback) Subjects: LCSH: Project management. | BISAC: BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Project Management. Classification: LCC HD69.P75 (ebook) | LCC HD69.P75 G845 2017 (print) | DDC 658.4/04--dc23 LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2017032505 ISBN: 978-1-62825-184-5 Published by: Project Management Institute, Inc. 14 Campus Boulevard Newtown Square, Pennsylvania 19073-3299 USA Phone: +1 610-356-4600 Fax: +1 610-356-4647 Email: customercare@pmi.org Website: www.PMI.org ©2017 Project Management Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. Project Management Institute, Inc. content is copyright protected by U.S. intellectual property law that is recognized by most countries. To republish or reproduce PMI’s content, you must obtain our permission. Please go to http://www.pmi.org/permissions for details. To place a Trade Order or for pricing information, please contact Independent Publishers Group: Independent Publishers Group Order Department 814 North Franklin Street Chicago, IL 60610 USA Phone: +1 800-888-4741 Fax: +1 312- 337-5985 Email: orders@ipgbook.com (For orders only) For all other inquiries, please contact the PMI Book Service Center. PMI Book Service Center P.O. Box 932683, Atlanta, GA 31193-2683 USA Phone: 1-866-276-4764 (within the U.S. or Canada) or +1-770-280-4129 (globally) Fax: +1-770-280-4113 Email: info@bookorders.pmi.org Printed in the United States of America. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, manual, photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without prior written permission of the publisher. The paper used in this book complies with the Permanent Paper Standard issued by the National Information Standards Organization (Z39.48—1984). PMI, the PMI logo, PMBOK, OPM3, PMP, CAPM, PgMP, PfMP, PMI-RMP, PMI-SP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA, PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, PM NETWORK, PMI TODAY, PULSE OF THE PROFESSION and the slogan MAKING PROJECT MANAGEMENT INDISPENSABLE FOR BUSINESS RESULTS. are all marks of Project Management Institute, Inc. For a comprehensive list of PMI trademarks, contact the PMI Legal Department. All other trademarks, service marks, trade names, trade dress, product names and logos appearing herein are the property of their respective owners. Any rights not expressly granted herein are reserved. 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 N OTI C E The Project Management Institute, Inc. (PMI) standards and guideline publications, of which the document contained herein is one, are developed through a voluntary consensus standards development process. This process brings together volunteers and/or seeks out the views of persons who have an interest in the topic covered by this publication. While PMI administers the process and establishes rules to promote fairness in the development of consensus, it does not write the document and it does not independently test, evaluate, or verify the accuracy or completeness of any information or the soundness of any judgments contained in its standards and guideline publications. PMI disclaims liability for any personal injury, property or other damages of any nature whatsoever, whether special, indirect, consequential or compensatory, directly or indirectly resulting from the publication, use of application, or reliance on this document. PMI disclaims and makes no guaranty or warranty, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of any information published herein, and disclaims and makes no warranty that the information in this document will fulfill any of your particular purposes or needs. PMI does not undertake to guarantee the performance of any individual manufacturer or seller’s products or services by virtue of this standard or guide. In publishing and making this document available, PMI is not undertaking to render professional or other services for or on behalf of any person or entity, nor is PMI undertaking to perform any duty owed by any person or entity to someone else. Anyone using this document should rely on his or her own independent judgment or, as appropriate, seek the advice of a competent professional in determining the exercise of reasonable care in any given circumstances. Information and other standards on the topic covered by this publication may be available from other sources, which the user may wish to consult for additional views or information not covered by this publication. PMI has no power, nor does it undertake to police or enforce compliance with the contents of this document. PMI does not certify, test, or inspect products, designs, or installations for safety or health purposes. Any certification or other statement of compliance with any health or safety-related information in this document shall not be attributable to PMI and is solely the responsibility of the certifier or maker of the statement. � � TABLE O F CONTENTS PART 1. A GUIDE TO THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT BODY OF KNOWLEDGE (PMBOK® Guide) 1. INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Overview and Purpose of this Guide ................................................................................ 1 1.1.1 The Standard for Project Management ............................................................... 2 1.1.2 Common Vocabulary ............................................................................................ 3 1.1.3 Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct ........................................................... 3 1.2 Foundational Elements ..................................................................................................... 4 1.2.1 Projects ................................................................................................................. 4 1.2.2 The Importance of Project Management ........................................................... 10 1.2.3 Relationship of Project, Program, Portfolio, and Operations Management............................................................................. 11 1.2.4 Components of the Guide................................................................................... 17 1.2.5 Tailoring .............................................................................................................. 28 1.2.6 Project Management Business Documents ...................................................... 29 � � 2. THE ENVIRONMENT IN WHICH PROJECTS OPERATE................................................................ 37 2.1 Overview ......................................................................................................................... 37 2.2 Enterprise Environmental Factors.................................................................................. 38 2.2.1 EEFs Internal to the Organization ...................................................................... 38 2.2.2 EEFs External to the Organization ..................................................................... 39 I 2.3 Organizational Process Assets ...................................................................................... 39 2.3.1 Processes, Policies, and Procedures ................................................................. 40 2.3.2 Organizational Knowledge Repositories ........................................................... 41 2.4 Organizational Systems ................................................................................................. 42 2.4.1 Overview ............................................................................................................. 42 2.4.2 Organizational Governance Frameworks .......................................................... 43 2.4.3 Management Elements ...................................................................................... 44 2.4.4 Organizational Structure Types ......................................................................... 45 3. THE ROLE OF THE PROJECT MANAGER.................................................................................... 51 3.1 Overview ......................................................................................................................... 51 3.2 Definition of a Project Manager ..................................................................................... 52 3.3 The Project Manager’s Sphere of Influence .................................................................. 52 3.3.1 Overview ............................................................................................................. 52 3.3.2 The Project.......................................................................................................... 53 3.3.3 The Organization ................................................................................................ 54 3.3.4 The Industry ....................................................................................................... 55 3.3.5 Professional Discipline ...................................................................................... 56 3.3.6 Across Disciplines .............................................................................................. 56 3.4 Project Manager Competences ...................................................................................... 56 3.4.1 Overview ............................................................................................................. 56 3.4.2 Technical Project Management Skills ............................................................... 58 3.4.3 Strategic and Business Management Skills ..................................................... 58 3.4.4 Leadership Skills ................................................................................................ 60 3.4.5 Comparison of Leadership and Management ................................................... 64 3.5 Performing Integration ................................................................................................... 66 3.5.1 Performing Integration at the Process Level..................................................... 67 3.5.2 Integration at the Cognitive Level...................................................................... 67 3.5.3 Integration at the Context Level ........................................................................ 67 3.5.4 Integration and Complexity................................................................................ 68 II Table of Contents 4. PROJECT INTEGRATION MANAGEMENT ................................................................................... 69 4.1 Develop Project Charter ................................................................................................. 75 4.1.1 Develop Project Charter: Inputs ......................................................................... 77 4.1.2 Develop Project Charter: Tools and Techniques ................................................ 79 4.1.3 Develop Project Charter: Outputs ...................................................................... 81 4.2 Develop Project Management Plan ................................................................................ 82 4.2.1 Develop Project Management Plan: Inputs ....................................................... 83 4.2.2 Develop Project Management Plan: Tools and Techniques .............................. 85 4.2.3 Develop Project Management Plan: Outputs..................................................... 86 4.3 Direct and Manage Project Work ................................................................................... 90 4.3.1 Direct and Manage Project Work: Inputs .......................................................... 92 4.3.2 Direct and Manage Project Work: Tools and Techniques ................................. 94 4.3.3 Direct and Manage Project Work: Outputs ........................................................ 95 4.4 Manage Project Knowledge ........................................................................................... 98 4.4.1 Manage Project Knowledge: Inputs ................................................................. 100 4.4.2 Manage Project Knowledge: Tools and Techniques ........................................ 102 4.4.3 Manage Project Knowledge: Outputs .............................................................. 104 4.5 Monitor and Control Project Work ............................................................................... 105 4.5.1 Monitor and Control Project Work: Inputs ....................................................... 107 4.5.2 Monitor and Control Project Work: Tools and Techniques .............................. 110 4.5.3 Monitor and Control Project Work: Outputs .................................................... 112 4.6 Perform Integrated Change Control ............................................................................. 113 4.6.1 Perform Integrated Change Control: Inputs .................................................... 116 4.6.2 Perform Integrated Change Control: Tools and Techniques ........................... 118 4.6.3 Perform Integrated Change Control: Outputs .................................................. 120 4.7 Close Project or Phase ................................................................................................. 121 4.7.1 Close Project or Phase: Inputs ......................................................................... 124 4.7.2 Close Project or Phase: Tools and Techniques ................................................ 126 4.7.3 Close Project or Phase: Outputs ...................................................................... 127 III 5. PROJECT SCOPE MANAGEMENT ............................................................................................ 129 5.1 Plan Scope Management.............................................................................................. 134 5.1.1 Plan Scope Management: Inputs ..................................................................... 135 5.1.2 Plan Scope Management: Tools and Techniques ............................................ 136 5.1.3 Plan Scope Management: Outputs .................................................................. 137 5.2 Collect Requirements ................................................................................................... 138 5.2.1 Collect Requirements: Inputs .......................................................................... 140 5.2.2 Collect Requirements: Tools and Techniques ................................................. 142 5.2.3 Collect Requirements: Outputs ........................................................................ 147 5.3 Define Scope ................................................................................................................. 150 5.3.1 Define Scope: Inputs ........................................................................................ 152 5.3.2 Define Scope: Tools and Techniques ............................................................... 153 5.3.3 Define Scope: Outputs...................................................................................... 154 5.4 Create WBS ................................................................................................................... 156 5.4.1 Create WBS: Inputs .......................................................................................... 157 5.4.2 Create WBS: Tools and Techniques ................................................................. 158 5.4.3 Create WBS: Outputs ........................................................................................ 161 5.5 Validate Scope .............................................................................................................. 163 5.5.1 Validate Scope: Inputs ..................................................................................... 165 5.5.2 Validate Scope: Tools and Techniques ............................................................ 166 5.5.3 Validate Scope: Outputs ................................................................................... 166 5.6 Control Scope ............................................................................................................... 167 5.6.1 Control Scope: Inputs ....................................................................................... 169 5.6.2 Control Scope: Tools and Techniques .............................................................. 170 5.6.3 Control Scope: Outputs .................................................................................... 170 6. PROJECT SCHEDULE MANAGEMENT...................................................................................... 173 6.1 Plan Schedule Management ........................................................................................ 179 6.1.1 Plan Schedule Management: Inputs ................................................................ 180 6.1.2 Plan Schedule Management: Tools and Techniques ....................................... 181 6.1.3 Plan Schedule Management: Outputs ............................................................. 181 6.2 Define Activities............................................................................................................ 183 6.2.1 Define Activities: Inputs ................................................................................... 184 IV Table of Contents 6.2.2 Define Activities: Tools and Techniques .......................................................... 184 6.2.3 Define Activities: Outputs ................................................................................ 185 6.3 Sequence Activities ...................................................................................................... 187 6.3.1 Sequence Activities: Inputs ............................................................................. 188 6.3.2 Sequence Activities: Tools and Techniques .................................................... 189 6.3.3 Sequence Activities: Outputs ........................................................................... 194 6.4 Estimate Activity Durations.......................................................................................... 195 6.4.1 Estimate Activity Durations: Inputs ................................................................. 198 6.4.2 Estimate Activity Durations: Tools and Techniques ........................................ 200 6.4.3 Estimate Activity Durations: Outputs .............................................................. 203 6.5 Develop Schedule ......................................................................................................... 205 6.5.1 Develop Schedule: Inputs ................................................................................ 207 6.5.2 Develop Schedule: Tools and Techniques ....................................................... 209 6.5.3 Develop Schedule: Outputs .............................................................................. 217 6.6 Control Schedule ....................................................................... ...
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Tutor Answer

Engr_Audrey
School: University of Maryland

The files below contain complete work of your assignment. Kindly check it and let me know if you need any clarification. Thank you.

Running Head: ALPINE CONSTRUCTORS SCOPE STATEMENT OUTLINE

Alpine Constructors Scope Statement Outline
NAME
INSTITUTION
DATE

1

ALPINE CONSTRUCTORS SCOPE STATEMENT OUTLINE

2

Alpine Constructors Scope Statement Outline
Thesis statement: A scope statement is a document that outlines the range of the project.
It guides and centers the project on its operations and as well forms the basis for future decisions
that concern the project. The Scope Statement also facilitates efficiency during decision making
and in planning since all the stakeholders are on a common base in the project understanding.
The conflicting of ideas will be solved since the scope statement gives the directives. An
elaborate scope statement must have various components of which four are the most essential in
aiding the resource allocation. Every stakeholder is issued with a copy to have a full familiarity
with all the operations and that the firm will conduct.
Answer

ALPINE CONSTRUCTORS SCOPE STATEMENT OUTLINE
References
List of cited work

3


Running Head: ALPINE CONSTRUCTORS SCOPE STATEMENT

Alpine Constructors Scope Statement
NAME
INSTITUTION
DATE

1

ALPINE CONSTRUCTORS SCOPE STATEMENT.

2

Alpine Constructors Scope Statement.
A scope statement is a document that outlines the range of the project. It guides and
centers the project on its operations and as well forms the basis for future decisions that concern
the project. The Scope Statement also facilitates efficiency during decision making and in
planning since all the stakeholders are on a common base in the project understanding. The
conflicting of ideas will be solved since the scope statement gives the directives. An elaborate
scope statement must have various components of which four are the most essential in aiding the
resource allocation. Every stakeholder is issued with a copy to have a full familiarity with all the
operations and that the firm will conduct.
Justification
This is normally the first component in the scope statement that is necessary for planning
and allocation of resources. The project justification serves to address the reason as to why the
project is being undertaken. The Alpine constructor is a firm that was started with the a...

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Anonymous
Tutor went the extra mile to help me with this essay. Citations were a bit shaky but I appreciated how well he handled APA styles and how ok he was to change them even though I didnt specify. Got a B+ which is believable and acceptable.

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