Strategizing and Improvement

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timer Asked: Oct 21st, 2018
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Question Description

Company – CHESTER

Product – CEDAR (LOW END Segment)

CapSim Login – Username: 22830631

Password: CTUstudent

Competition Round 2 – Due by Monday 10/22/18 11:59 PM CST with DESCISIONS SAVED

As you begin Competition round 2, you will need to evaluate the results of your decisions from the first competition round. As a team, you need to discuss these results and decide which strategy you will choose for the second round. Each member of the team should review the strategy for his or her role, and then a decision needs to be made on the overall strategy for the second round.

Task Assignment Part 1: Team Participation to Begin the Competition 2ndRound

  • Log in to your account from the CAPSIM home page.
  • On the next screen, click on the "C#####" number to get into the course.
  • Left hand side, click on "Decisions" and then "Launch the web spreadsheet".
  • Enter your user ID and password.
  • Begin the competition for Round 2.
  • Go to "Decisions," and start making decisions.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

BUSINESS SIMULATIONS USA & Canada 877.477.8787 Outside USA & Canada +1.312.477.7200 WWW.CAPSIM.COM The Course Road Map Registration Getting Started Practice Rounds Go to capsim.com/register, follow the onscreen instructions and register into your Industry.* Create your User ID and Password. Login with your User ID and Password at capsim.com. Click on Capstone. Go to Getting Started and follow the steps that include: Most instructors include team Practice rounds. When the Practice is over, the simulation will restart from the beginning, using the unique model selected by your instructor. *Your instructor may have given you an Industry ID Number. If not, you can locate your industry by using your school name/campus and either the course section number, start date or your instructor’s initials. » Reviewing the Rehearsal Tutorial » Opening the Capstone Spreadsheet » Forming your company (if applicable) Competition Rounds When the Competition begins, your decisions count! Additional tasks could include: » Optional Homework Assignments » Peer Evaluations See your Dashboard for complete information. (if applicable) Your instructor might include a Comp-XM exam. Go to the Course Page and choose Comp-XM. Follow the instructions on the Dashboard which include: » Decision making using the Comp-XM Spreadsheet » Board Queries (quizzes) Table of Contents 1 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 INTRODUCTION .............................................................. 1 The Industry Conditions Report ..................................1 Management Tools .......................................................1 Company Departments ............................................... 2 Inter-Department Coordination ................................. 3 Practice and Competition Rounds .............................. 3 Company Success ......................................................... 3 2 INDUSTRY CONDITIONS .......................................... 3 2.1 2.2 Buying Criteria .............................................................. 3 Buying Criteria by Segment ........................................ 5 3 3.1 3.2 3.3 THE CUSTOMER SURVEY SCORE ............................. 5 Buying Criteria and the Customer Survey Score ............. 6 Estimating the Customer Survey Score ...................... 8 Stock Outs and Seller’s Market ...................................9 4 MANAGING YOUR COMPANY ................................. 9 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 Research & Development (R&D) ................................10 Marketing .................................................................... 11 Production ...................................................................13 Finance .........................................................................15 5 THE CAPSTONE COURIER ...................................... 17 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 Front Page ................................................................... 17 Stock & Bond Summaries .......................................... 17 Financial Summary ..................................................... 17 Production Analysis ....................................................17 Segment Analysis Reports .........................................18 Market Share Report ..................................................19 Perceptual Map .......................................................... 19 5.8 Other Reports ..............................................................19 6 PROFORMAS AND ANNUAL REPORTS...................... 19 6.1 6.2 6.3 7 7.1 7.2 Balance Sheet .............................................................. 19 Cash Flow Statement ................................................. 20 Income Statement ...................................................... 20 ADDITIONAL MODULES ......................................... 20 TQM/Sustainability ..................................................... 20 HR (Human Resources) .............................................. 20 8 PLUG-INS ............................................................. 21 8.1 Making Decisions ....................................................... 21 9 SITUATION ANALYSIS ............................................ 2110 FORECASTING ...................................................... 22 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 Basic Forecasting Method ........................................ Qualitative Assessment ............................................. Forecasts, Proformas and the December 31 Cash Position ............................................................... Worst Case/Best Case ............................................... 11 BALANCED SCORECARD ....................................... 23 12 SIX BASIC STRATEGIES ...................................... 24 Broad Cost Leader ..................................................... 24 Broad Differentiator ................................................... 24 Niche Cost Leader (Low Technology) ....................... 24 Niche Differentiator (High Technology) ................... 24 Cost Leader with Product Lifecycle Focus ............... 24 Differentiator with Product Lifecycle Focus ............ 24 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 12.5 12.6 SUPPORT TICKETS: If you need assistance, please submit a support ticket. Login at capsim.com, click Capstone, then in the left menu, select Help > Support. If you have problems registering, send an email to support@capsim.com. 22 22 23 23 Management Tools 1 Introduction Congratulations, you are now in charge of a multimillion dollar company. You manufacture sensors, which you market to other manufacturers. They put your products into the devices they sell. Your company was created when the government split a monopoly into identical competitors. As a monopoly, operating inefficiencies and poor product offerings were not addressed because: Increasing costs could be passed onto customers; and Mediocre products would sell because customers had no other choices. Although last year’s financial results were decent, your products are getting old, your marketing efforts are falling short, your production lines need revamping and your financial management is almost nonexistent. Competition in the post-monopoly era means you can no longer ignore these issues. If you do, competitors with better products and/ or lower prices will take your market share. Sensors Are Everywhere... 1.1 The Industry Conditions Report Each simulation industry is unique. As your simulation starts, the Industry Conditions Report, which is explained in Chapter 2, will outline the beginning business environment, including customer buying criteria. 1.2 Management Tools Here are the tools you need to run your company. 1.2.1 The Rehearsal Tutorial Think of the Rehearsal Tutorial as a driving school for the simulation. The tutorial will show you ways to steer the company, including how to: Invent and revise products; Make marketing decisions; Schedule production and buy/sell equipment; and Ensure your company has the financial resources it needs for the upcoming year. The sample resources used for the Rehearsal, including its Capstone Courier (see below) and Industry Conditions Report, mirror those used in the actual simulation. 1.2.2 The Capstone Courier Every round, you and your competitors will have access to an industry newsletter called the Capstone Courier. The Courier (described in Chapter 5) is an extensive year-end report of the sensor industry. It includes customer buying patterns, product positioning, public financial records and other information that will help you get ahead. In business, knowledge is power. If you want to evaluate your company’s performance or analyze your competitors, the Courier is the place to start. Customer Survey Scores for each product (Chapter 3) can be found in the Courier’s Segment Analysis pages. These scores determine sales distribution. In general, the higher the score, the better the sales. The Courier Reports “Last Year’s Results” Team Member Guide 1 Company Departments 1.3 Company Departments The Rehearsal Tutorial and Chapter 4 discuss company activities. You have four main departments or functional areas: 1.2.3 The Situation Analysis Completing the Situation Analysis (described in Chapter 9) will enable you to understand current market conditions and how the industry will evolve in the next few years. It will assist you with your operational planning. The Situation Analysis comes in two versions: Online interactive Downloadable PDF (pen and paper) Research & Development, or R&D Marketing Production Finance Many simulations utilize modules such as Human Resources and TQM (Total Quality Management)/Sustainability. Modules require additional management decisions. Your simulation Dashboard will tell you if any modules are included. Companies use the Capstone Spreadsheet to enter departmental decisions. 1.3.1 Research & Development (R&D) 1.2.4 Proformas & Annual Reports Proformas and annual reports are specific to your company. Proformas are projections for the upcoming year. Annual reports are the results from the previous year. The proformas will help you envision the impacts of your pending decisions and sales forecasts. The annual reports will help you analyze last year’s results. Your R&D Department designs your product line. The department needs to invent and revise products that appeal to your customers’ changing needs. 1.3.2 Marketing Your Marketing Department prices and promotes your products. It interacts with your customers via its sales force and distribution system. Marketing is also responsible for sales forecasts. 1.3.3 Production Your Production Department determines how many units will be manufactured during the year. It is also responsible for buying and selling production lines. 1.3.4 Finance Your Finance Department makes sure your company has the financial resources it needs to run through the year. The department can raise money via one-year bank notes, 10-year bonds or stock issues. 1.2.5 The Capstone Spreadsheet The Capstone Spreadsheet is the nerve center of your company where you formulate and finalize management decisions for every department. The spreadsheet comes in two versions: A Web Version that allows you to work via any Internet browser; and An XLS Version that runs via Microsoft® Excel®. 1.2.6 Just in Time Information In the spreadsheet decision areas, look for the flag symbol shown to the right. Clicking it will give you detailed information about the area you are viewing. 2 The department can also issue stock dividends, buy back stock or retire bonds before their due dates. 1.3.5 Plug-ins Plug-ins are different than modules. Plug-ins and their decisions have a greater overall impact on your organization. For example, the simulation might include the Ethics plug-in, which presents you with an unexpected dilemma. Group discussion and consensus is imperative because your decisions will affect your financial results. Your simulation Dashboard will notify you if a plug-in has been scheduled. Buying Criteria 1.4 Inter-Department Coordination to success! Companies compete for up to eight rounds, with each round simulating one year in the life of your company. 1.4.1 R&D and Marketing 1.5.1 Decision Audits R&D works with Marketing to make sure products meet customer expectations. The Decision Audit is a complete trail of all team decisions. It will help you identify your decision-making strengths and weaknesses. 1.4.2 R&D and Production R&D works with Production to ensure assembly lines are purchased for new products. If Production discontinues a product, it should notify R&D. 1.4.3 Marketing and Production Marketing works with Production to make sure manufacturing quantities are in line with forecasts. Marketing’s market growth projections also help Production determine appropriate levels of capacity. If Marketing decides to discontinue a product, it tells Production to sell the product’s production line. 1.4.4 Marketing and Finance Marketing works with Finance to project revenues for each product and to set the Accounts Receivable policy, which is the amount of time customers can take to pay for their purchases. 1.6 Company Success The board of directors, shareholders and other stakeholders expect you to make the company a market leader. Successful managers will: Analyze the market and its competing products; Create and execute a strategy; and Coordinate company activities. Best of luck in running a profitable and sustainable company! 1.4.5 Finance and Production Production tells Finance if it needs money for additional equipment. If Finance cannot raise enough money, it can tell Production to scale back its requests or perhaps sell idle capacity. 1.4.6 Finance and All Departments The Finance Department acts as a watchdog over company expenditures. Finance should review Marketing and Production decisions. Finance should cross-check Marketing’s forecasts and pricing. Are forecasts too high or too low? Will customers be willing to pay the prices Marketing has set? Is Production manufacturing too many or too few units? Does Production need additional capacity? Has Production considered lowering labor costs by purchasing automation? 1.5 Practice and Competition Rounds Practice Rounds allow you to organize workflow among the members of your company. You will begin to compete against the other companies in your simulation or, if you are in a Footrace competition, against a common set of computer-run companies. 2 Industry Conditions The information in your Industry Conditions Report will help you understand your customers. Your customers fall into different groups, which are represented by market segments. Customers within a market segment have similar needs. The segments are named for the customer’s primary requirements such as: Traditional Low End High End Performance Size The Industry Conditions Report lists market segment sales percentages and projected growth rates unique to your simulation. how experiment After the conclusion of the Practice Rounds the simulation is reset and the real competition begins. Now it’s time to drive your company 2.1 Buying Criteria Customers within each market segment employ different standards as they evaluate products. They consider four buying criteria: Price, Age, MTBF (Mean Time Before Failure) and Positioning. Team Member Guide 3 Buying Criteria 2.1.1 Price Each segment has different price expectations. One segment might want inexpensive products while another, seeking advanced technology, might be willing to pay higher prices. 2.1.2 Age Each segment has different age expectations, that is, the length of time since the product was invented or revised. One segment might want brand-new technology while another might prefer proven technology that has been in the market for a few years. 2.1.3 MTBF (Mean Time Before Failure) or Reliability MTBF (Mean Time Before Failure) is a rating of reliability measured in hours. Segments have different MTBF criteria. Some might prefer higher MTBF ratings while others are satisfied with lower ratings. 2.1.4 Positioning Sensors vary in their dimensions (size) and the speed/sensitivity with which they respond to changes in physical conditions (performance). Combining size and performance creates a product attribute called positioning. The Perceptual Map Positioning is such an important concept that marketers developed a tool to track the position of their products and those of their competitors. This tool is called a Perceptual Map. Note the Perceptual Map in Figure 2.1. You will see this map quite often through the course of the simulation. The map measures size on the vertical axis and performance on the horizontal axis. Each axis extends from 0 to 20 units. The arrow in Figure 2.1 points to a product called Able with a performance measurement of 8.0 and a size of 12.0. 4 2.1.5 Market Segment Positions on the Perceptual Map Market segments have different positioning preferences. The Low End segment is satisfied with inexpensive products that are large in size and slow performing. It wants products that fall inside the upper-left set of dashed and solid circles in Figure 2.2. The High End segment wants products that are faster performing and smaller in size. It wants products that fall within the lower-right set of dashed and solid circles. Over time, your customers expect products that are smaller and faster. This causes the segments to move or drift a little each month. As the years progress the locations of the circles significantly change. The example in Figure 2.3 shows the location of the market segments at the end of the fourth year. Figure 2.4 shows the segments at the end of the eighth year. Buying Criteria by Segment Each year, some market segments demand greater improvement than others. Therefore segments drift at different rates. Segments demanding greater improvement will move faster and farther than others. As time goes by, the overlap between the segments diminishes. Market segments will not move faster to catch up with products that are better than customer expectations. Customers will refuse to buy a product positioned outside the circles. Customers are only interested in products that satisfy their needs. This includes being within the circles on the Perceptual Map! Your R&D and Marketing Departments have to make sure your products keep up with changing customer preferences. To do this, R&D must reposition products, keeping them within the moving segment circles. See “4.1 Research & Development (R&D)” for more information. 2.2 Buying Criteria by Segment Buyers in each segment place a different emphasis upon the four buying criteria. For example, some customers are more interested in price, while others are more interested in positioning. Perceptual Maps Can Be Used for Many Types of Products... Buying Criteria for the previous year are reported in the Capstone Courier’s Segment Analysis pages. As you take over the company to make decisions for Round 1, your reports reflect customer expectations as of December 31, Round 0 (yesterday). The Industry Conditions Report displays the Round 0 buying criteria for each market segment. Here are two example segments. Example 1: Customers seek proven products at a modest price. Age, 2 years– importance: 47% Price, $20.00-$30.00– importance: 23% Ideal Position, size 16.0/performance 4.0– importance: 21% MTBF, 14,000-19,000– importance: 9% Example 2: Customers seek cutting-edge technology in size/ performance and new designs. Ideal Position, size 11.1/performance 8.9– importance: 43% Age, 0 years– importance: 29% MTBF, 20,000-25,000– importance: 19% Price, $30.00-$40.00– importance: 9% 3 The Customer Survey Score In any month, a product’s demand is driven by its monthly customer survey score. Assuming it does not run out of inventory, a product with a higher score will outsell a product with a lower score. Team Member Guide 5 Buying Criteria and the Customer Survey Score 3.1.1 Positioning Score A customer survey score reflects how well a product meets its segment’s buying criteria. Company promotion, sales and accounts receivable policies also affect the survey score. Scores are calculated once each month because a product’s age and positioning change a little each month. If during the year a product is revised by Research and Development, the product’s age, positioning and MTBF characteristics can change quite a bit. As a result, it is possible for a product with a very good December customer survey score to have had a much poorer score–and therefore poorer sales– in the months prior to an R&D revision. Prices, set by Marketing at the beginning of the year, will not change during the year. 3.1 Buying Criteria and the Customer Survey Score The customer survey starts by evaluating each product against ...
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