Access over 20 million homework & study documents

Individuals And Society

Content type
User Generated
Subject
English
School
Los Angeles Pierce College
Type
Homework
Rating
Showing Page:
1/6
Surname 1
Student's Name
Professor's Name
Course
Date
Individuals and Society in "A White Heron" and "Drown"
Human beings have a special connection with society because their activities, expressions, and
behaviors reflect practices in their surroundings. In this regard, individuals do not solely regulate
their behaviors. The society, including its standards and practices, influence people's experiences
and dictates their self-actualization processes. As Hossain and Ali claim, society allows people to
conform to norms, occupy statuses, and belong to groups (130). The stories, "A White Heron" by
Sarah Orne Jewett and "Drown" by Junot Diaz help elaborate on the complex relationship
between humans as individuals and their relationship with society. Jewett addresses the idea of
human condition through her protagonist, Sylvia, who lives and thrives in solitude. Likewise,
Diaz presents the story of Yunior to illustrate how society influences people's experiences and
decisions that they make in their lives. Even though the protagonists in the stories live in
dissimilar societies, they help elaborate on the ways that people's surroundings influence their
experiences and behaviors.
A shared theme between the two stories is the struggle between innocence and self-
actualization. Jewett explores the theme of innocence when she presents her protagonist as a
young girl who lives a quiet life in the countryside. Before the hunter's arrival, Sylvia rarely
explores her surroundings, and her adventures revolve around looking for their cow or driving
her back home. She knows about the location of the ocean and great pine-tree but lacks the
courage to explore these mysteries. However, the appearance of the hunter encourages the

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
2/6
Surname 2
protagonist to explore the countryside, robbing off her innocence. One day before dawn, she
wakes up stealthily and goes climbing the tree to discover where the white heron lives (Jewett
62). While her drive is the hunter's bounty on the bird, she has an intrinsic desire to see "all the
world." Her adventures lead her to the discovery of the bird's habitat, with her initial innocence
transforming into experience and awakening her desire to conserve nature.
Likewise, the relationship between Yunior in "Drown" and Beto robs him his sexual
innocence and replaces it with an experience that dramatically transforms his life. The narrator
and Beto spent most of their childhood together, shoplifting from stores and watching movies at
home. Yunior mentions that his father is strict and would not tolerate indiscipline, contrary to his
friend's father, who does not punish his child. Yunior loses his childhood innocence one day
when watching the TV with Beto (Diaz 511). Beto sexually violates the protagonist, an
experience that negatively affects his relationship and adult life. After the experience, Yunior's
relationship with his best friend changes. Even as an adult, he lives an intertwined life with a
disingenuous relationship with his friend.
Unlike Sylvia, whose loss of childhood innocence helps her become wiser and
determined to conserve the environment, Yunior's loss of innocence significantly damages his
life. Arguably, the place where the protagonists live influences their behaviors and the ways that
they respond to solitude. Initially, Sylvia lived with her mother and siblings in the city before
moving to the countryside with her grandmother. She cherishes the solitude life in the
countryside where she interacts with nature freely. Hence, the secluded life with her grandmother
protects her from social evils in the city. For her, the loss of innocence and coming to age is a
positive experience that awakens her love for nature over human companionship (Indu 2).
Conversely, Yunior lives in a dysfunctional family and crime-prone neighborhood that

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
3/6

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
End of Preview - Want to read all 6 pages?
Access Now
Unformatted Attachment Preview
Surname 1 Student's Name Professor's Name Course Date Individuals and Society in "A White Heron" and "Drown" Human beings have a special connection with society because their activities, expressions, and behaviors reflect practices in their surroundings. In this regard, individuals do not solely regulate their behaviors. The society, including its standards and practices, influence people's experiences and dictates their self-actualization processes. As Hossain and Ali claim, society allows people to conform to norms, occupy statuses, and belong to groups (130). The stories, "A White Heron" by Sarah Orne Jewett and "Drown" by Junot Diaz help elaborate on the complex relationship between humans as individuals and their relationship with society. Jewett addresses the idea of human condition through her protagonist, Sylvia, who lives and thrives in solitude. Likewise, Diaz presents the story of Yunior to illustrate how society influences people's experiences and decisions that they make in their lives. Even though the protagonists in the stories live in dissimilar societies, they help elaborate on the ways that people's surroundings influence their experiences and behaviors. A shared theme between the two stories is the struggle between innocence and selfactualization. Jewett explores the theme of innocence when she presents her protagonist as a young girl who lives a quiet life in the countryside. Before the hunter's arrival, Sylvia rarely explores her surroundings, and her adv ...
Purchase document to see full attachment
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Anonymous
Really helpful material, saved me a great deal of time.

Studypool
4.7
Indeed
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4

Similar Documents