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Understanding Dying Death And Bereavement

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Capella University
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Understanding Dying, Death and Bereavement
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Understanding Dying, Death and Bereavement
Strange things happen suddenly, leading to pain and grief in society. Arguably, one of the
most painful experiences in life is death or losing a loved one. Although death is inevitable,
Americans fear and strive to avoid the topic. However, death is universal, inevitable, and
inseparable part of human life (Leming & Dickson, 2020). As such, this paper explores the
different aspects of death and grief. The main areas of focus include America's death avoidance,
death taboos, Kubler-Ross's stages of death, hospice care euthanasia, and dealing with grief and
loss. Understanding the nature of death helps the grieving to cope with grief as physicians and
the patient's family members learn to respect the wishes of terminally ill individuals.
Undoubtedly, patients prefer assisted suicide because it gives them dignified and peaceful death
and reduces the burden on their loved ones (Leming & Dickson, 2020). While the study outlines
fundamental ways of dealing with grief, death anxiety, and bereavement, it contends that death is
inevitable, and people must learn to accept its existence and consequences.
Americans' Avoidance of Death and Dying
Several Americans perceive the topics related to death and dying as unpleasant. Notably,
the death of millions of Americans during World War I is one of the main experiences that have
shaped how they perceive dying (Golbert, 2015). The experience led to increased interest in
understanding death, and it got incorporated as a genre of literature so that people can learn to
deal with the inevitable experience. Americans often try to deny the outcomes of death as an
avoidance mechanism of its consequences. Therefore, Samuel asserts that the avoidance of death
and dying complicates the lives of Americans who lose their loved ones (Golbert, 2015).
Additionally, healthcare providers were taught not to reveal to the dying patients or their
relatives that the terminal condition is inevitable.

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The Perception of Death from Birth to Twelve Years
People perceive death differently through various stages in life. In this regard, one's
understanding of death transforms drastically from birth to twelve years. Longbottom and
Slaughter (2018) highlight that children may assume that death is temporal and associated with
unrealistic causes. Nonetheless, their perception that the dead can passively participate in
activities changes, but most understand the terminal condition perfectly after reaching twelve
years of age. Besides, children may assume that death is avoidable and controllable. Eventually,
children understand the irreversibility of death as they gradually approach adolescence (Leming
& Dickinson, 2020). Indeed, the perception of death changes among children as they grow and
mature until they finally understand the agony that it causes.
Death Taboo among the Elderly in the United States
Elderly people in the United States regard death as a medical failure and a taboo. The
terminal condition is considered taboo because of its undesirable, emotional, ethical, financial,
and physical implications. Golbert (2015) explains that death is termed an "un-America
experience" because it is the leading cause of agony. The culture of elderly people regarding
death taboo has made people prefer not to talk about it directly despite being inevitable (Leming
& Dickinson, 2020). Although death is considered a taboo among Americans, associating it with
the loss of a loved one made it clear that death is universal, irreversible, and unavoidable.
Five Stages of Dying
Elizabeth Kübler-Ross divides the dying process into five progressive phases. These
stages include denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance (DABDA). In disbelief,
patients try to refute the terminal condition even if the outcome is foreseeable. Denial is followed
by anger or pain, which could be projected to God, physicians, and relatives (Leming &

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1 Understanding Dying, Death and Bereavement Student's Name Institutional Affiliation Course Number/Title Instructor's Name Submission Date 2 Understanding Dying, Death and Bereavement Strange things happen suddenly, leading to pain and grief in society. Arguably, one of the most painful experiences in life is death or losing a loved one. Although death is inevitable, Americans fear and strive to avoid the topic. However, death is universal, inevitable, and inseparable part of human life (Leming & Dickson, 2020). As such, this paper explores the different aspects of death and grief. The main areas of focus include America's death avoidance, death taboos, Kubler-Ross's stages of death, hospice care euthanasia, and dealing with grief and loss. Understanding the nature of death helps the grieving to cope with grief as physicians and the patient's family members learn to respect the wishes of terminally ill individuals. Undoubtedly, patients prefer assisted suicide because it gives them dignified and peaceful death and reduces the burden on their loved ones (Leming & Dickson, 2020). While the study outlines fundamental ways of dealing with grief, death anxiety, and bereavement, it contends that death is inevitable, and people must learn to accept its existence and consequences. Americans' Avoidance of Death and Dying Several Americans perceive the topics related to death and dying as unpleasant. Notably, the death of millions of Americans during World War I is one of the main ...
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