Access over 20 million homework & study documents
search

Mexican American Immigrants Analysis

Content type

User Generated

Subject

Social Science

Type

Analytical Review

Rating

Showing Page:
1/5
. In terms of immigration status, most Mexican American immigrants in the study were
not concerned as much with their status whilst in the United States. This may be due to the
location of the study, a region with many legal Mexican American immigrants and no policies
designed to prosecute undocumented immigrants. The lack of association between immigration
stress and alcohol use severity due to immigration status suggests that the Mexican American
immigrants in Florida were driven to depend on alcohol by experiences and encounters when
traveling to the United States and upon arriving. The final moderator analyzed in the study was
the role of social support. Mexican American immigrants that came to the United States in
groups and with family members were found to be less affected by immigration stress on
alcohol use severity. Adversely, many Mexicans that had a lower family cohesion lacked the
same social support and turned to abusing alcohol upon entering the United States. This
supports the claim that experiences both along the journey from Mexico to the United States
and when living in the United States impose stress upon Mexican American immigrants leading
them to rely on the abuse of alcohol to deal with that stress.
For many families in Mexico, it is impossible for all family members to migrate to the
United States due to a lack of financial capability. As a result of this, many Mexican men, usually
husbands and fathers, migrate to the United States alone with the goal of finding a stable job
with satisfying income and continuing to provide for their families by sending some of that
income back to Mexico. This system of familial support places a lot of new stress on the women

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
2/5
back in Mexico. The wives of the men that migrate to the United States are introduced to
“significant stressors associated with the loss of support, with adjustment to new obligations,
and with the potential for family disintegration” (Borges). In some cases, the absence of a
family member was even associated with higher rates of acute coronary syndrome. Not all
Mexican American immigrants are successful in the United States though. Due to an increase in
border patrol and deportation laws, some Mexican American immigrants end up returning to
Mexico either by force or because they were not able to secure a job. Return migrants are more
likely to develop a dependence disorder or abuse substances than others in the Mexican
population. Their failure to achieve success in the United States pushes them to drown their
sorrow and numb the pain, exponentially increasing their risk for suicidality. These stressors
account for an increased risk for suicidality amongst Mexican American immigrants and their
families back in Mexico. Research also shows that Mexican American children both born in the
United States and brought over at a young age are at a higher risk for suicide-related outcomes
than Mexican children that never leave. This is a result of the trauma experienced when
traveling at a young age and the introduction to discrimination when growing up in the United
States as an individual of Mexican origin. Some children had to endure displays of violence
against their parents and loved ones when traveling as their parents fought for their protection
from human smugglers and thieves. Most were taught to be quiet and not act out around
others so as not to draw attention both when traveling and attending schools in the United
States. The fear of losing their parents is always prevalent amongst children born in the United
States from Mexican American immigrants. In 2010, “the state of Arizona passed one of the
most restrictive immigration policies, SB1070, which allows police officers to verify individuals’

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
Showing Page:
3/5

Sign up to view the full document!

lock_open Sign Up
End of Preview - Want to read all 5 pages?
Access Now

Unformatted Attachment Preview

. In terms of immigration status, most Mexican American immigrants in the study were not concerned as much with their status whilst in the United States. This may be due to the location of the study, a region with many legal Mexican American immigrants and no policies designed to prosecute undocumented immigrants. The lack of association between immigration stress and alcohol use severity due to immigration status suggests that the Mexican American immigrants in Florida were driven to depend on alcohol by experiences and encounters when traveling to the United States and upon arriving. The final moderator analyzed in the study was the role of social support. Mexican American immigrants that came to the United States in groups and with family members were found to be less affected by immigration stress on alcohol use severity. Adversely, many Mexicans that had a lower family cohesion lacked the same social support and turned to abusing alcohol upon entering the United States. This supports the claim that experiences both along the journey from Mexico to the United States and when living in the United States impose stress upon Mexican American immigrants leading them to rely on the abuse of alcohol to deal with that stress. For many families in Mexico, it is impossible for all family members to migrate to the United States due to a lack of financial capability. As a result of this, many Mexican men, usually husbands and fathers, migrate to the United States alone with the goal ...
Purchase document to see full attachment
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.

Anonymous
Really helpful material, saved me a great deal of time.

Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4