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Count Revol 2

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History
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Santa Monica College
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THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND "POWERLESS GROUPS"
The American Revolution and "Powerless Groups"
Student's Name:
Institutional Affiliation:
Course Code:
Due Date:

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THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND "POWERLESS GROUPS"
I concur with Joan Hoff Wilson's assessment of the effects of the American Revolution of
1776 on American women, Native Americans, blacks, most property less white males, and
indentured servants. The ''counter-revolution of 1776'' irradiates how safeguarding of slavery was
an encouraging element for the groundbreaking war. Preceding 1776, anti-slavery opinions
expanded all over Britain and in the Caribbean; defiant Africans were in the insurgency. For
European colonists in America, the main risk to their security was alien conquest combined with
an insurgence of the confined. It was a tangible and frightening likelihood that London would
enforce abolition all over the colonies. The ending of servitude appeared all but unavoidable in
London, relishing Africans as much as it annoyed slaveholders, and igniting the colonial
Revolution.
Once the American Revolt concluded in 1783, pro-British ex-slaves could not live in
America. The fresh United States was still a slave-owning country. Fugitive black slaves who
had fought for the British turned into the targets of detestation by white Americans. Moreover,
they could not leave for the West Indies since the economy of these islands rested on slave labor.
In the 1783 Treaty of Paris that concluded the American Revolt, the British relinquished all
Indian lands as far west as the Mississippi River to the Americans. This put pro-British Indians at
the compassion of Americans, who were not disposed to be liberal. It was by and large held that
by assisting the British, the Indian tribes surrendered their rights to land inside the United States.
The new nation felt it was right in compelling the Indians to leave for Canada or to the
unidentified parts past the Mississippi.

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1 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND "POWERLESS GROUPS" The American Revolution and "Powerless Groups" Student's Name: Institutional Affiliation: Course Code: Due Date: 2 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND "POWERLESS GROUPS" I concur with Joan Hoff Wilson's assessment of the effects of the American Revolution of 1776 on American women, Native Americans, blacks, most property less white males, and indentured servants. The ''counter-revolution of 1776'' irradiates how safeguarding of slavery was an encouraging element for the groundbreaking war. Preceding 1776, anti-slavery opinions expanded all over Britain and in the Caribbean; defiant Africans were in the insurgency. For European colonists in America, the main risk to their security was alien conquest combined with an insurgence of the confined. It was a tangible and frightening likelihood that London would enforce abolition all over the colonies. The ending of servitude appeared all but unavoidable in London, relishing Africans as much as it annoyed slaveholders, and igniting the colonial Revolution. Once the American Revolt concluded in 1783, pro-British ex-slaves could not live in America. The fresh United States was still a slave-ownin ...
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