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Anemia Effect On A1c

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Pharmacology
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University of Washington
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Running head: PHARMACOLOGY 1
Pharmacology
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PHARMACOLOGY 2
Anemia Effect on A1C
A1C is a medical tool that is widely known for monitoring glycemic control in patients
with diabetes. It is regarded as a tool for measuring the blood test for type 2 diabetes in particular
and prediabetes for 2-3 months (Radin, 2014). The average blood glucose or sugar level is
measured to make a diagnosis. In addition, the A1C could also be used to allow doctors to
provide a framework for managing a patient’s diabetes. The A1C tests that are conducted vary
from the blood sugar checks that diabetic patients do on a daily basis. The average A1C level is
usually below 6%, and a type two diabetes result is above 6.5%, and the ultimate goal for many
diabetic patients is below 7% by ensuring that they have a proper diabetes care plan. The higher
the level of the A1C, the poorer the blood sugar control of the patient, which is also a risk of
complications related to a diabetes condition.
A blood sample is drawn during the test by pricking the patient’s fingertip with a tiny
pointed lancet or inserting a needle into the vein located in the arm. The blood sample is then
taken to the laboratory for analysis. It is a minor procedure that takes about five minutes, and the
results take about two days. The reason for using A1C to measure blood glucose in diabetes is
because they are more accurate in showing whether a person is a risk of having diabetes
complications or improvements and also predicts future diabetes for a person at risk to start a
healthy program to keep diabetes at bay (Radin, 2014). However, there are certain instances
where Anemia and acute blood loss could influence lower A1C results. In this case, the amount
of time after an acute blood loss is critical in determining the accuracy of reflecting blood sugar
levels in the results. For instance, GI bleed could falsely lower A1C results, and therefore the
AIC could be reused after 2 to 3 months to reflect blood sugars accurately.

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Running head: PHARMACOLOGY 1 Pharmacology Student Name Tutor Name Institutional Affiliation Course Date PHARMACOLOGY 2 Anemia Effect on A1C A1C is a medical tool that is widely known for monitoring glycemic control in patients with diabetes. It is regarded as a tool for measuring the blood test for type 2 diabetes in particular and prediabetes for 2-3 months (Radin, 2014). The average blood glucose or sugar level is measured to make a diagnosis. In addition, the A1C could also be used to allow doctors to provide a framework for managing a patient’s diabetes. The A1C tests that are conducted vary from the blood sugar checks that diabetic patients do on a daily basis. The average A1C level is usually below 6%, and a type two diabetes result is above 6.5%, and the ultimate goal for many diabetic patients is below 7% by ensuring that they have a proper diabetes care plan. The higher ...
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