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Hebrew Prophetic Literature Paper

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Hebrew Prophetic Literature 1
Hebrew Prophetic Literature
Name of the Student
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Hebrew Prophetic Literature 2
Main Features of Hebrew Prophetic Literature
The Prophet’s Call
Prominence accorded to the prophet’s call is among the striking features of prophetic
literature. The books of Isiah, Ezekiel, and Jeremiah all open with accounts of calls of respective
prophets. Jeremiah 1: 4-7 (The Holy Bible, new international version. (1984) underscores the call
of Jeremiah to be God’s servant, where he states that he sees himself as a child. Isaiah’s vision
which he received in the Temple shows the call to holiness vital to his prophetic message. Amos’
divine call to holiness is seen during his clash with the priest of Bethel, Amaziah.
Commissioning of the prophets happens for a given situation or some message. There is also
assurance from God of help.
Reports of Visions
Visions come in various colors and shapes. The report of visions consists of an
announcement, transition, and finally the vision sequence as basic elements (Ahn, John. (2007).
The announcement comes in reports that the prophet “sees” or is “made to see” some occurrence.
Some reports begin metaphorically, such as the prophet “lifts his eyes up and sees…” (Zech 2:1,
5). Reports of visions can be found in books such as Jeremiah 24:1 or Ezekiel 1:1-3. The
prophets can sometimes only observe something of a scene, be it simple (Jer 38:21-22) or
complex as in 1 Kings 22:19-22.
Symbolic Action
Prophets expressed themselves through the use of symbolic actions. Ezekiel, Jeremiah,
Isaiah, and Elijah made use of symbolic actions to prophesy. This can be seen in the case of
Jeremiah breaking into pieces the clay vessel (Jer 19). Symbolic actions also come in the form of
a movement, ritualistic gestures, or a dramatized action. For instance, Isaiah wrote upon a scroll

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Hebrew Prophetic Literature 1 Hebrew Prophetic Literature Name of the Student Institution Course Hebrew Prophetic Literature 2 Main Features of Hebrew Prophetic Literature The Prophet’s Call Prominence accorded to the prophet’s call is among the striking features of prophetic literature. The books of Isiah, Ezekiel, and Jeremiah all open with accounts of calls of respective prophets. Jeremiah 1: 4-7 (The Holy Bible, new international version. (1984) underscores the call of Jeremiah to be God’s servant, where he states that he sees himself as a child. Isaiah’s vision which he received in the Temple shows the call to holiness vital to his prophetic message. Amos’ divine call to holiness is seen during his clash with the priest of Bethel, Amaziah. Commissioning of the prophets happens for a given situation or some message. There is also assurance from God of help. Reports of Visions Visions come in various colors and shapes. The report of visions consists of an announcement, transition, and finally the vision sequence as basic elements (Ahn, John. (2007). The announcement comes in reports that the prophet “sees” or is “made to see” some occurrence. Some reports begin metaphorically, such as the prophet “lifts his eyes up and sees…” (Zech 2:1, 5). Reports of visions can be found in books such as Jeremiah 24:1 or Ezekiel 1:1-3. The prophets can sometimes only observe something of a scene, be it simple (Jer 38:21-22) or complex as in 1 Kings 22:19-22. ...
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