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Half a Million Dollar Rip Off Unequal Pay Every Day Article Analysis

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Business

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Analytical Review

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The article is mainly about the way society treats women in the work place. The article
starts its argument from the World War II era until our modern day and it looks at how women
gets paid a little bit over 70 cents to a man’s dollar on average. “Yet, women in American today
earn 78 cents to a man's dollar, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, and have struggled for
decades to achieve equal pay for equal work.” The article goes on and argues that women in
during the World War II era were practically taking over the work force, during which men were
fighting the war. After the end of the war, men returned back to their normal jobs and women
saw a very steep decline in the job market. In fact “in 1945, the men came home and employers
were allowed to replace female workers with males without cause.” This caused a feminist group
to be assembled in which a lot of things were done in order for things to change. In 1963, Pres.
John F. Kennedy signed the Equal Pay Act of 1963 in which made it easier for women to be paid
equally as men. In 2009-2011 The Equal Paycheck Act was introduced. Although it faced a lot of
republican opposition in the congress, the feminist groups promised not to settle until their
paycheck equaled that of a man’s with the same job.
Page 377 of Business Law: Text and Exercises chapter 28 defines workplace
discrimination as “Treating employees or job applicants unequally on the basis of race, color,
gender, national origin, religion, or age.” The article Half a Million Dollar Rip-Off: Unequal Pay
Every Day directly supports that definition in page 377 and elaborates on it. Focusing on
discrimination in the work place, the article argues that women’s dollar should never be worth 78
cents at any given time comparing to a man’s full dollar. The text book also suggests the same
approach of not settling down until a full equality in the work place is reached. The feminist
group that rallied to have the Equal Pay Act of 1963 signed considers the firing of female
workers for men to be a type of desperate-treatment discrimination. The book goes onto this
definition even further stating that “Intentional discrimination against individuals on the basis of
color, gender, national origin, race, or religion.” Last but not least, the text agrees with that
sometime even congress women go against a bill that is made to support the female worker in the
work place. The article ends its argument with a strong link to the book in that “Senator Kelly
Ayotte, (R-NH) worried that it would prohibit merit-based pay, although merit pay is carved out
in the original bill.

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Half a Million Dollar Rip-Off:
Unequal Pay Every Day
Posted: 11/05/2014 3:30 pm EST Updated: 11/05/2014 3:59 pm EST
The war on women permeates American society. Consider the non-progress of equal pay for
equal work.
Imagine the outrage if employers routinely told two men applying for the same job, "I need
forklift operators. You both have equal experience. I'll hire you both. Of course, Bob will
earn one dollar an hour because he's short, and John will get 78 cents an hour because he's
tall." Tall men wouldn't tolerate height discrimination and would quickly enact laws
prohibiting it.
Yet, women in American today earn 78 cents to a man's dollar, according to the U.S. Census
Bureau, and have struggled for decades to achieve equal pay for equal work.
During WWII, women joined the work force and men joined the armed force. In 1945, the
men came home and employers were allowed to replace female workers with males without
cause. Many companies who had hired women during the war, reverted to hiring only men,
and working women saw their jobs reclassified and their wages lowered. Newspapers
published separate job listings for men and women and ran identical jobs, but with different
pay scales for men and women.
In the 1950's, women entered the job market in great numbers, and bosses (usually men)
paid them less for equal work because, supposedly, women didn't need the money. They
worked for extra money and men worked to support their families. Also, old cultural
messages taught that women belonged in the home taking care of children and should be
punished for invading men's terrain.
Feminists fought to correct the gender wage gap and, because of their efforts, President
John F. Kennedy signed The Equal Pay Act on June 10, 1963. It read in part:

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The article is mainly about the way society treats women in the work place. The article starts its argument from the World War II era until our modern day and it looks at how women gets paid a little bit over 70 cents to a man’s dollar on average. “Yet, women in American today earn 78 cents to a man's dollar, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, and have struggled for decades to achieve equal pay for equal work.” The article goes on and argues that women in during the World War II era were practically taking over the work force, during which men were fighting the war. After the end of the war, men returned back to their normal jobs and women saw a very steep decline in the job market. In fact “in 1945, the men came home and employers were allowed to replace female workers with males without cause.” This caused a feminist group to be assembled in which a lot of things were done in order for things to change. In 1963, Pres. John F. Kennedy signed the Equal Pay Act of 1963 in which made it easier for women to be paid equally as men. In 2009-2011 The Equal Paycheck Act was introduced. Although it faced a lot of republican opposition in the congress, the feminist groups promised not to settle until their paycheck equaled that of a man’s with the same job. Page 377 of Business Law: Text and Exercises chapter 28 defines workplace discrimination as “Treating employees or job applicants unequally on the basis of race, color, gender, national origin, religion, or age.” ...
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Anonymous
Awesome! Perfect study aid.

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