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Alternative Policies for Dealing with Confederate Monuments Paper

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ALTERNATIVE POLICIES FOR DEALING WITH CONFEDERATE MONUMENTS
(Name of Student)
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Alternative policies for dealing with confederate monuments
Introduction
The removal of Robert E. Lee statue in Virginia created an unprecedented street
protests of extremist groups in recent memories. The violent clashes between the groups
followed by the death of a young woman has forced the country to think about the
significance of confederate monuments. It has raised the question on whether statues which
represent dark periods of a country history ought to be removed, or should the monuments be
reserved as a reminders of the historical injustices and trauma? States, Cities and Counties
across the South have been particularly caught up in this divisive debate on how to deal with
their Confederate monuments. Some say that the monuments and statues idolize those who
fought for and protected the institution of slavery and should therefore be brought down
1
.
Others maintain that history must not be erased, and that the monuments are an aide-mémoire
of their Southern heritage. The two sides make very notable points. A lot of the Confederate
exultation is memorialized in the monuments. They are displaying the triumphalism of people
who disregarded the civil rights of others especially since the intention of such monuments is
to marginalize the issue of slavery by substituting it with false arguments under the auspices
of state rights. But promiscuously relocating such monuments is an attempt to erase history
and may result in equivalent historical mistakes. Removal of such monuments might calm the
current anger especially in a highly polarized political environment.
Discussion
Proposals
The complete removal of Confederate monuments is an effort to rewrite the southern
states history. It demonstrates a lack of deeper understanding of United States troubled
history. Confederate monuments are a material acknowledgement of the individuals they try
1
C. Mills, and P. Simpson. Monuments to the Lost Cause: Women, art, and the landscapes of Southern memory.
Univ. of Tennessee Press, 2003, p,20.

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1 ALTERNATIVE POLICIES FOR DEALING WITH CONFEDERATE MONUMENTS (Name of Student) (Course) (Date) 2 Alternative policies for dealing with confederate monuments Introduction The removal of Robert E. Lee statue in Virginia created an unprecedented street protests of extremist groups in recent memories. The violent clashes between the groups followed by the death of a young woman has forced the country to think about the significance of confederate monuments. It has raised the question on whether statues which represent dark periods of a country history ought to be removed, or should the monuments be reserved as a reminders of the historical injustices and trauma? States, Cities and Counties across the South have been particularly caught up in this divisive debate on how to deal with their Confederate monuments. Some say that the monuments and statues idolize those who fought for and protected the institution of slavery and should therefore be brought down1. Others maintain that history must not be erased, and that the monuments are an aide-mémoire of their Southern heritage. The two sides make very notable points. A lot of the Confederate exultation is memorialized in the monuments. They are displaying the triumphalism of people who disregarded the civil rights of others especially since the intention of such monuments is to marginalize the issue of slavery by substituting it with false arguments under the auspices of state rights. But promiscuously relocating such monuments ...
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Awesome! Perfect study aid.

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