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Prevention of Reoffending & Social Re Integration Programs Research

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Prevention of reoffending 1
Introduction
According to the United Nations (2012), individual countries report up to 70% rates
of reoffending. The ministry of Justice in the United Kingdom reported rates higher than 70%
in some prisons. Ludici A, Boccato F and Faccio E (2018) define reoffending as a person
committing the same crime they have been previously convicted for. They further indicate
that prisoners are more likely to repeat their offence because of economic problems and
social exclusion. Addressing the various factors that put these offenders at risk of reoffending
is among the instituted prevention strategies. It includes facilitation of effective social support
to these detainees and improving successful re-integration into the society after serving their
prison time. Other research studies report that offenders with reduced prison sentences have a
lower probability of re-offending. The following paper addresses the question whether re-
offending can be prevented. It addresses various interventions that can be put in place
including examples from specific studies.
Prevention of reoffending
There are several reasons that influence individuals to return to their previous life
of crime after imprisonment. A handbook on the crime prevention guidelines (2010) explains
key re-integration concepts that are informed by evidence. According to this book, offenders
face social adaptation issues which affect them significantly if not well addressed. This leads
to a vicious cycle of reoffending and reconviction. There is therefore need for implementation
of rehabilitation programmes that reduce reoffending and improve public safety.
Successful prevention of reoffending means that offenders detest from committing a
crime when released to the outside world. This can be done with or without external
intervention as long as the offenders maintain a crime free life. Culshaw (2008) emphasizes
the importance of long-term change rather than short-term control of crime impulses.

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Prevention of reoffending 2
Social re-integration programs
This is one of the strategies used to prevent re-offending. Social re-integration programs
are meant to offer support to offenders to detest from crimes and facilitate easy transition into
their communities. These programmes are available at different stages within and outside the
criminal justice process. They offer a wide array of services that address both social and
physical needs of the offenders hence fostering positive re-integration outcomes. Culshaw
(2008) states that the factors predisposing previous offenders to criminal behaviour should be
confronted before and after imprisonment in manner that prevents incidences of reoffending.
Different countries are implementing interventions that facilitate adjustment after
release from prison. In the United Kingdom, The Association of Chief Officers has adopted
resettlement programs (Handbook on the crime prevention guidelines, 2010). In these
programs, the offender is offered resources that reduce the incidence of reoffending. Research
indicates that components of these re-integration programs have been effective in reducing
re-offending. However, only few evaluations of the existing programs have been done.
Mackenzie and Farrington (2015) study indicates the difference between successful and
unsuccessful rehabilitation programs. For re-integration to be effective, the programs should
be consistent and rigorous depending on the offense committed.
Some re-integration programs however do not take into consideration the laid down
principles leading to undesired outcomes. This may be due to poor funding or management of
the rehabilitation programmes. According to the Visher (2006) the money allocated to prisons
for post-release services is usually insufficient to efficiently address the needs of individuals
released from prisons. The initiation of different prison reform polices over the years has seen
a great improvement in the way most of these programs are run.

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Prevention of reoffending 1 Introduction According to the United Nations (2012), individual countries report up to 70% rates of reoffending. The ministry of Justice in the United Kingdom reported rates higher than 70% in some prisons. Ludici A, Boccato F and Faccio E (2018) define reoffending as a person committing the same crime they have been previously convicted for. They further indicate that prisoners are more likely to repeat their offence because of economic problems and social exclusion. Addressing the various factors that put these offenders at risk of reoffending is among the instituted prevention strategies. It includes facilitation of effective social support to these detainees and improving successful re-integration into the society after serving their prison time. Other research studies report that offenders with reduced prison sentences have a lower probability of re-offending. The following paper addresses the question whether reoffending can be prevented. It addresses various interventions that can be put in place including examples from specific studies. Prevention of reoffending There are several reasons that influence individuals to return to their previous life of crime after imprisonment. A handbook on the crime prevention guidelines (2010) explains key re-integration concepts that are informed by evidence. According to this book, offenders face social adaptation issues which affect them significantly if not well addressed. This leads to a vicious cycl ...
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