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Subject
Psychology
School
Lonestar College
Type
Homework
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NAME
DATE OF SUBMISSION
JOURNAL REFERENCE
Wennberg, B., Janeslätt, G., Kjellberg, A., & Gustafsson, P. (2017). Effectiveness of time-related
interventions in children with ADHD aged 915 years: a randomized controlled study.
European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 27(3), 329-342. doi: 10.1007/s00787-017-
1052-5
SUMMARY OF FINDINGS
Children with ADHD have demonstrated to have deficits in cognitive processes and
mental skills that help a person plan, monitor, and effectively execute their goals. Notably, these
children show deficits in executive functions such as organizing materials and activities, time
management, and planning (OTMP). Wennberg, Janeslätt, Kjellberg, and Gustafsson (2017)
carried out a randomized controlled study (RCT) to examine how multimodal treatments,
including the time-processing ability (TPA) and compensation with time-assisted devices, impact
TAD and daily time management (DTM) in children in the age of 9 to 15 years, matched only to
an educational intervention (p. 331). Wennberg and colleagues hypothesized that the
experimental group's study subjects would improve their TPA and DTM considerably likened to
the subjected in the group that did not receive treatment by the researchers.
The RCT was conducted in Sweden, where 65 children with a mean age set of 11.6 years
were asked to participate in the study. However, only 46 of the participants provided
knowledgeable agreement to partake in the study, and they were randomly allocated to the
treatment/control group. Out of the 46 participants, eight were excluded due to a lack of
complete follow-up assessment for 24 weeks, did not meet the criteria, or withdrew their

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consent. The study was left with 38 participants who were allocated in the intervention and
control group equally. Each group had five girls. Before Wennberg and colleagues conducted the
RCT, they performed a pilot study to determine if the length of the intervention and data
collection process were practical and acceptable for the participants (332). After testing the
practicality of the RCT, the researchers designed multimodal interventions with three
components: advocacy, compensation, and remediation based procedures for treatments for
children with ADHD. Both the experimental and control groups were treated to the first
intervention, advocacy in the form of parent and coach education. Next, the intervention group
was exposed to the other two modules, compensation, and remediation. The compensation
module entailed solving the problem using various types of time-assisted devices, developing
personal compensation plans, and altering the physical settings based on the needs of each child
(Wennberg, Janeslätt, Kjellberg & Gustafsson, 2017, p. 332). In implementing the remediation
intervention, coaches supported children by providing them with training time skills to enable
them to perform training daily at home or school. On the other hand, the control group received
standard methods of care only. The researchers collected data at the baseline for the two, both the
intervention and control group. The length of the intervention period depended on the clinician's
experience and earlier research on OTMP. The implementation stage lasted for three months,
where neither of the group received any intervention apart from psychological or medical
support. A follow-up evaluation was conducted after six months (Wennberg, Janeslätt, Kjellberg
& Gustafsson, 2017, p. 332).
A KaTid instrument was used to analyze the results where researchers used raw scores as
both the TPAs’ total score and for each subscale: time management, time orientation, and time
perception. Also, researchers analyzed demographics using descriptive statistics, whereby they

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NAME DATE OF SUBMISSION JOURNAL REFERENCE Wennberg, B., Janeslätt, G., Kjellberg, A., & Gustafsson, P. (2017). Effectiveness of time-related interventions in children with ADHD aged 9–15 years: a randomized controlled study. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 27(3), 329-342. doi: 10.1007/s00787-0171052-5 SUMMARY OF FINDINGS Children with ADHD have demonstrated to have deficits in cognitive processes and mental skills that help a person plan, monitor, and effectively execute their goals. Notably, these children show deficits in executive functions such as organizing materials and activities, time management, and planning (OTMP). Wennberg, Janeslätt, Kjellberg, and Gustafsson (2017) carried out a randomized controlled study (RCT) to examine how multimodal treatments, including the time-processing ability (TPA) and compensation with time-assisted devices, impact TAD and daily time management (DTM) in children in the age of 9 to 15 years, matched only to an educational intervention (p. 331). Wennberg and colleagues hypothesized that the experimental group's study subjects would improve their TPA and DTM considerably likened to the subjected in the group that did not receive treatment by the researchers. The RCT was conducted in Sweden, where 65 children with a mean age set of 11.6 years were asked to participate in the study. However, only 46 of the participants provided knowledgeable agreement to partake in the study, and they were randomly allocated to the treatment/co ...
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